Bhuvnesh K Sharma

Dr. Bhuvnesh K Sharma

MS, PhD

SycTek Lab.Inc

Senior Director (Translational Oncology)

Utah | United States

Specialties: Translational Cancer Research

Bhuvnesh K Sharma

Dr. Bhuvnesh K Sharma

MS, PhD
Introduction

Bhuvnesh K Sharma, PhD is a Senior Director R&D (Translational Oncology) at ScyTeK Laboratories Inc., Logan UT, USA. He also holds appointment as Consultant, Celprogen Inc. Torrance, CA. He did his Post-Doctoral Trainings in Molecular Oncology/ Immuno-Virology at St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School, London, UK and Johns Hopkins University Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Dr. Sharma has previously served as Adjunct Associate Professor, Georgetown Univ. School of Medicine Washington DC; Senior Scientist, Weinberg Cancer Institute MedStar Health Franklin Square Medical Center, Baltimore, MD; Deputy Director of Institute of Preventive Oncology, N. Delhi, India; Visiting Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Visiting Scientist, Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Dr. Sharma is the recipient of awards & other distinguished recognitions for his discoveries on predictive cancer biomarkers. He has published numerous articles on cancer biomarkers and conducted research reviews on Emerging Cancer Vaccines and Intralesional tumor Immunotherapy. He is a noted expert in Melanoma Stem Cell research and Newer Optimism for Targeted Cancer Therapeutics. Dr. Sharma is also serving as an editorial board member of prestigious journals in Biomedicine/ Stem Cell Research/ Oncology.



Primary Affiliation: SycTek Lab.Inc - Utah , United States

Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr. Bhuvnesh K Sharma’s Resume / CV
Metrics

13

Publications

1096

Profile Views

35

Reads

39

PubMed Central Citations

Top co-authors
Elias G Elias
Elias G Elias

Franklin Square Hospital Center

2
Joanne H Hasskamp
Joanne H Hasskamp

The Maryland Melanoma Center

2
Laure Aurelian
Laure Aurelian

University of Maryland School of Medicine

2
Cynthia C Smith
Cynthia C Smith

University of Maryland School of Medicine

1
Joseph W Burnett
Joseph W Burnett

University of Maryland School of Medicine

1
Michael D Gober
Michael D Gober

University of Maryland School of Medicine

1
Samantha Q Wales
Samantha Q Wales

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

1
Fumitake Ono
Fumitake Ono

Kurume University School of Medicine

1

Publications

13Publications

35Reads

39PubMed Central Citations

Adjuvant Therapy in High Risk Patients with Primary Cutaneous Melanoma: Pas , Present and Future: A Review

Cancer Stu Open Access 2014 Sept27;1:106.

Aperito Cancer Studies

Intralesional administration of low nontoxic doses of GM-CSF followed by IL-2 prior to the surgical resection of small melanoma lesions could be an effective adjuvant therapy in high risk melanoma patients regardless to their tumor antigenic or genetic characteristics. This autologous approach utilizes patient own tumor, own dendritic cells and own cytotoxic T-cells in-vivo can overcome tumor heterogeneity. It seems also be more effective and cheaper than any other therapeutic approaches . Finally, there is a need for prospective clinical trials for this new approach of adjuvant therapy.

View Article
September 2014
28 Reads

Melanoma vaccines, revisited a review, update

2014 Jul 31. [Epub ahead of print]

G Ital Dermatol Venereol.

Melanoma vaccines are usually administered after surgical resection of the tumor with the hope of eradicating the micro---metastases, in high---risk patients. As we previously reported, most of the melanoma vaccines failed to show any major impact on the disease, except for the autologous whole cell vaccine. This can be explained by the heterogeneous nature of cutaneous melanoma that expresses various levels of melanoma antigens, peptides and has various genetic profiles among different patients. From an immunological point of view, it is illogic to eliminate the tumor and its specific antigens then apply allogenic type of therapy and expect a tumor response. Therefore, it is more logical is to utilize the tumor site as a source for the tumor---specific antigens. In the meantime, patients with in---transit metastases can give us an excellent opportunity to evaluate the local and systemic effects of intralesional (intratumoral) therapy, and various agents have been utilized with equivocal results. On the other hand, intralesional administration of 2 cytokines seemed to process the tumor antigens and activates thymic---derived lymphocytes (T cells). This can induce an anti---tumor immune response in vivo, i.e., autoimmunization (auto---vaccination), specific to each patient, and overcome tumor heterogeneity regardless to its antigenic or genetic profiles.

View Article
July 2014
18 Reads

Tumor response and patient survival after intralesional therapy with low-dose GM-CSF and IL-2 in metastatic and primary cutaneous melanoma: An exploratory study.

J Clin Oncol 32, 2014 (suppl; abstr e20002)

J.Clin.Oncol

Dermal and subdermal metastatic melanoma can give us an excellent opportunity to evaluate the local and systemic effects of intralesional therapy. While GM-CSF administration can activate and induce autologous dendretic cells (APCs), IL-2 administration can stimulate autologous T cells at the tumor site. Methods: Patients with derma and subdermal metastases, regardless to the extent of their disease or previous therapy, who consented to the study, each received intralesional GM-CSF 500 μg once/week for 4-6 weeks. If no complete clinical response (CR) was observed at the injection sites, intralesional IL-2 was substituted at 18 million IU weekly for the same length of time. One patient with primary invasive melanoma with a satellite lesion and regional lymph node (LN) metastasis, who remained a surgical candidate, received both cytokines at th skin lasions one week before surgery. Results: Four patients had > 126 small in-transit metastases, each lesion measuring few mm up to 1 cm. All had CR confirmed pathologically 6-8 weeks after cessation of therapy, with disease-free survival of 37-54 months. Another three patients with large sclerotic skin lesions failed to respond to either cytokine. One of two patients with distant metastases who had palpable subdermal tumors had CR of all metastases for 6 months. The resected tissues from the patient with primary melanoma with a satellite lesion revealed complete tumor necrosis at both injection sites with massive pigmented histiocytosis at the skin sites and in some LNs. Immunohistochemical studies showed overexpression of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD83+ cells at the primary site, the satellite and in some of the LNs. This patient is alive disease-free for over 48 months. Conclusions: Intralesional therapy seemed to utilize the tumor site as a source for tumor-specific antigens giving rise to autoimmunization with strong antitumor response regardless of tumor antigenic or genetic profiles. These observations open up new aspects for clinical trials to standardize the management of in-transit metastases and to initiate new approaches to adjuvant therapy in high-risk melanoma patients.

View Article
April 2014
11 Reads

Sequential Intralesional Administration of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and Interleukin-2 (IL-2) in Dermal and Subdermal Melanoma Lesions Can Induce Immense Antitumor Immune Response: A Potential New Approach to Adjuvant Immunotherapy

Volume 186, Issue 2 , 682, 2014

Journal of Surgical Research

Patients with dermal and subdermal metatases as well as invasive primary melanoma allow a great opportunity to evaluate the local and systemic response to intralesional therapy. Methods: Ten patients were studied and completed 2½ years of of follow-up. Four had multiple small intransit metastases each measured 3mm-1cm with 3 to >100 lesions per patient, three had large coalesced sclerotic lesions, and two had distant metastases with palpable subcutaneous nodules. Each received intralesional GM-CSF 500 μg weekly, and in case of failure, IL-2 was substituted at 18 million IU weekly. One patient with invasive primary melanoma and a satellite lesion received both cytokines at the skin lesions one week preoperatively. All the patients had flow cytometric analysis of the peripheral blood before and during therapy. All resected tissues were examined histopathologically and by immunohistochemistry. Results: This was safe and nontoxic program. Three of the four patints with small lesions had complete response (CR) to GM-CSF and one failed but had CR to IL-2. All four patients are alive free of disease for 31-45 months. The three patients with sclerotic lesions failed to respond to either agents. One of the two patients with distant metastases had CR for 6 months. The resected tissues from the patient with primary and satellite lesions revealed complete tumor necrosis with massive histiocytosis and overexpression of CD8+, CD83+ and CD25+ cells at the injection sites and regional lymph nodes and is alive free of disease for over 32 months. The flow cytometric analysis showed no significant changes in white cell differentiation and no dendritic cells were identified before or during therapy. Conclusions: Consequential intralesional administration of GM-CSF and IL-2 seems to have a role in the management of some high-risk patients. While GM-CSF can stimulate autologous dendritic cells, IL-2 activates T cells in the presence of patient own tumor. Such combination can activate a strong antitumor response specific to the patient, which is taken-up by the lymphatics

View Article
February 2014
10 Reads

Targeting Melanoma Sites in Vivo Can Induce Complete Tumor Ablation and Prolong Patient Survival: An Exploratory Study

J Cancer Sci.Ther 2013.

J Cancer Science &.Therapy

Intralesional therapy with GM-CSF/IL-2 can be effective in primary as well as in some metastatic melanoma. In addition, preoperative intralesional administration of both cytokines at the primary site can induce a strong antitumor autoimmune response in vivo, specific to the patient, as an adjuvant immunotherapy.These two cytokines can be administered with autologous vaccines, but never with allogenic material as it can result in immune deviation or tolerance.These observations open new aspects for clinical trials

View Article
September 2013
18 Reads

Clonal dominance of CD133+ subset population as risk factor in tumor progression and disease recurrence of human cutaneous melanoma.

Int J Oncol 2012 Nov 17;41(5):1570-6. Epub 2012 Aug 17.

Department of Surgical Oncology, The Maryland Melanoma Center, The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Cancer Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA.

View Article
November 2012
11 Reads
7 PubMed Central Citations(source)
3.02 Impact Factor

Immuno-expression of human melanoma stem cell markers in tissues at different stages of the disease.

J Surg Res 2010 Sep 14;163(1):e11-5. Epub 2010 Apr 14.

Maryland Melanoma Center, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

View Article
September 2010
3 Reads
15 PubMed Central Citations(source)
1.94 Impact Factor

Cytokines and growth factors expressed by human cutaneous melanoma.

Cancers (Basel) 2010 May 7;2(2):794-808. Epub 2010 May 7.

Maryland Melanoma Center, Weinberg Cancer Institute, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, MD, USA.

View Article
May 2010
5 Reads
5 PubMed Central Citations(source)

Biology of human cutaneous melanoma.

Cancers (Basel) 2010 Mar 12;2(1):165-89. Epub 2010 Mar 12.

Maryland Melanoma Center, Weinberg Cancer Institute, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, MD, USA.

View Article
March 2010
8 Reads

Aberrant DNA methylation silences the novel heat shock protein H11 in melanoma but not benign melanocytic lesions

2006;213(3):192-9.

Dermatology

H11 is a promising target for the molecular therapy of melanoma The heat shock protein H11 is silenced by aberrant DNA methylation in melanoma, but not benign melanocytic lesions or normal skin melanocytes.

View Article
July 2006
18 Reads

Stress up-regulates neuronal expression of the herpes simplex virus type 2 large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (R1; ICP10) by activating activator protein 1.

J Neurovirol 2005 Aug;11(4):329-36

Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201-1559, USA.

View Article
August 2005
2 Reads
9 PubMed Central Citations(source)
2.60 Impact Factor

CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood transport herpes simplex virus DNA fragments to the skin of patients with erythema multiforme (HAEM).

J Invest Dermatol 2005 Jun;124(6):1215-24

Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.

View Article
June 2005
6 Reads
3 PubMed Central Citations(source)
7.22 Impact Factor

Emerging Aspects of Neoadjuvant Immunotherapy in High Risk Melanoma

www.smgebook.com

Smg ebook : Managment of Malignant Melanoma

Cutaneous melanoma is an immunogenic tumor, but it seems to be very heterogeneous.Utilizing patient own tumor as the source for tumor-specific antigens, intralesional administration of GM-CSF as 500 µg once/week could activate dendritic cells at the tumor site.Failure to establish complete response (CR), IL-2 was substituted at 11 million IU weekly to activate T lymphocytes. This autologous approach seemed to overcome tumor heterogeneity.Three of four patients with in-transit metastases, including one with un-resected primary lesion, had CR to GM-CSF. One failed but had CR to intralesional IL-2. Two patients with distant metastases with palpable subcutaneous nodes had CR at the injection sites only; one to GM-CSF and the other to IL-2. The sites of CR were biopsied 6-8 weeks after cessation of therapy revealed no residual tumor or mononuclear cell infiltrates. Patient with an invasive primary cutaneous melanoma with a satellite metastasis received GM-CSF followed by IL-2 on two consecutive days at the primary and the satellite, one week prior to surgical resection.The resected tissue showed complete tumor necrosis with massive histiocytosis at both injection sites.There was also an overexpression of cytotoxic T cells (CD8+), helper cells (CD4+), and mature DCs (CD83+) at the injection sites and in some regional lymph nodes. The overall duration of response ranged from 31-60 months to date. In vivo autoimmunization of melanoma sites by intralesional administration of the cytokines seemed to induce an immense antitumor response that was transmitted via the lymphatics and seemed to prolong patient survival.

View Article
17 Reads
Top co-authors
Elias G Elias
Elias G Elias

Franklin Square Hospital Center

2
Joanne H Hasskamp
Joanne H Hasskamp

The Maryland Melanoma Center

2
Laure Aurelian
Laure Aurelian

University of Maryland School of Medicine

2
Cynthia C Smith
Cynthia C Smith

University of Maryland School of Medicine

1
Joseph W Burnett
Joseph W Burnett

University of Maryland School of Medicine

1
Michael D Gober
Michael D Gober

University of Maryland School of Medicine

1
Samantha Q Wales
Samantha Q Wales

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

1
Fumitake Ono
Fumitake Ono

Kurume University School of Medicine

1