Publications by authors named "Bhupesh Jain"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Epidemiology and Genotype Distribution of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Under-Five Children of South Rajasthan, India.

Indian J Pediatr 2021 Mar 2;88(Suppl 1):105-111. Epub 2021 Feb 2.

The Wellcome Trust Research Laboratory, Christian Medical College (CMC), Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.

Objective: To determine the epidemiology of rotavirus diarrhea and its genotypes distribution among under five children from Udaipur, Rajasthan.

Methods: Hospital-based prospective study among children aged 0-59 mo of age hospitalized due to acute gastroenteritis and assess the clinical and epidemiological profile. Stool samples collected during 2017-2019 from 734 children, were tested by enzyme immune assay (EIA) to identify rotavirus and the samples that were positive were subjected to genotyping using published methods.

Results: Rotavirus was detected in 12.94% (95/734) of the stool samples. Maximum positivity (38.9%) was seen in children aged 12-23 mo followed by 34.7% in 6-11 mo of age. Detection rates were higher (46.31%, 44/95) during winter months of December-February; 65% children with rotavirus diarrhea had severe dehydration followed by moderate dehydration in 32% of cases. G3P[8] (40, 43.01%) was the commonest genotype followed by G9P[4] (10, 10.75%).

Conclusion: Among under-five children hospitalized due to acute gastroenteritis in a tertiary care setting in Udaipur, Rajasthan, 12.9% of children were rotavirus positive with predominant (43.01%) circulation of G3P[8] strains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12098-020-03626-zDOI Listing
March 2021

A Hospital-Based Multi-Centric Study to Determine the Clinico-Epidemiological Profile of Intussusception in Children < 2 Years in Rajasthan, India.

Indian J Pediatr 2021 Mar 6;88(Suppl 1):131-137. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.

Objective: To determine the clinical and epidemiological profile of Intussusception in children aged <2 y after introduction of rotavirus vaccine in Universal Immunization Programme of Rajasthan.

Method: This was a hospital-based multi-centric surveillance study conducted at three tertiary care sentinel sites in Rajasthan over a period of 2 y. Children <2 y of age admitted with intussusception as per Brighton's criteria 1 were enrolled. Demographic details including age, sex, clinical presentation, diagnostic methods, duration of symptoms, mode of treatment, and complications were recorded and analyzed.

Results: During the study period of 2 y, the authors identified 164 cases of intussusception based on level-1 Brighton's criteria. Median age at presentation was 7 mo [Interquartile range (IQR) 5-10 mo] with a male to female ratio of 2:1. Pain abdomen and blood stained stool were the commonest presenting complaints (88.4% and 81.7%, respectively). Commonest site of intussusception was Ileocolic (82.32%). Pathological lead point was identified in 18.9% cases. Distinct seasonality was observed as maximum cases of intussusception were detected in the months of Jan-March (34.1%). Surgical intervention was required in the 89.63% cases. The median time duration between onset of symptoms and admission at sentinel site was 2 d (IQR 1-3 d). Proportion of cases that required surgery increased as the time interval between onset of symptoms and admission increases.

Conclusion: Intussusception is a common surgical condition among children under-two years of age with majority of cases occurring during infancy. Case management is dependent primarily on time duration elapsed between symptoms onset and admission to tertiary care centre. Early case detection and timely referral may provide an opportunity to avoid surgical interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12098-020-03601-8DOI Listing
March 2021