Publications by authors named "Bettina Gürtl"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Epistasis-driven identification of SLC25A51 as a regulator of human mitochondrial NAD import.

Nat Commun 2020 12 1;11(1):6145. Epub 2020 Dec 1.

CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, Austria.

About a thousand genes in the human genome encode for membrane transporters. Among these, several solute carrier proteins (SLCs), representing the largest group of transporters, are still orphan and lack functional characterization. We reasoned that assessing genetic interactions among SLCs may be an efficient way to obtain functional information allowing their deorphanization. Here we describe a network of strong genetic interactions indicating a contribution to mitochondrial respiration and redox metabolism for SLC25A51/MCART1, an uncharacterized member of the SLC25 family of transporters. Through a combination of metabolomics, genomics and genetics approaches, we demonstrate a role for SLC25A51 as enabler of mitochondrial import of NAD, showcasing the potential of genetic interaction-driven functional gene deorphanization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19871-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7708531PMC
December 2020

The RESOLUTE consortium: unlocking SLC transporters for drug discovery.

Authors:
Giulio Superti-Furga Daniel Lackner Tabea Wiedmer Alvaro Ingles-Prieto Barbara Barbosa Enrico Girardi Ulrich Goldmann Bettina Gürtl Kristaps Klavins Christoph Klimek Sabrina Lindinger Eva Liñeiro-Retes André C Müller Svenja Onstein Gregor Redinger Daniela Reil Vitaly Sedlyarov Gernot Wolf Matthew Crawford Robert Everley David Hepworth Shenping Liu Stephen Noell Mary Piotrowski Robert Stanton Hui Zhang Salvatore Corallino Andrea Faedo Maria Insidioso Giovanna Maresca Loredana Redaelli Francesca Sassone Lia Scarabottolo Michela Stucchi Paola Tarroni Sara Tremolada Helena Batoulis Andreas Becker Eckhard Bender Yung-Ning Chang Alexander Ehrmann Anke Müller-Fahrnow Vera Pütter Diana Zindel Bradford Hamilton Martin Lenter Diana Santacruz Coralie Viollet Charles Whitehurst Kai Johnsson Philipp Leippe Birgit Baumgarten Lena Chang Yvonne Ibig Martin Pfeifer Jürgen Reinhardt Julian Schönbett Paul Selzer Klaus Seuwen Charles Bettembourg Bruno Biton Jörg Czech Hélène de Foucauld Michel Didier Thomas Licher Vincent Mikol Antje Pommereau Frédéric Puech Veeranagouda Yaligara Aled Edwards Brandon J Bongers Laura H Heitman Ad P IJzerman Huub J Sijben Gerard J P van Westen Justine Grixti Douglas B Kell Farah Mughal Neil Swainston Marina Wright-Muelas Tina Bohstedt Nicola Burgess-Brown Liz Carpenter Katharina Dürr Jesper Hansen Andreea Scacioc Giulia Banci Claire Colas Daniela Digles Gerhard Ecker Barbara Füzi Viktoria Gamsjäger Melanie Grandits Riccardo Martini Florentina Troger Patrick Altermatt Cédric Doucerain Franz Dürrenberger Vania Manolova Anna-Lena Steck Hanna Sundström Maria Wilhelm Claire M Steppan

Nat Rev Drug Discov 2020 07;19(7):429-430

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/d41573-020-00056-6DOI Listing
July 2020

A widespread role for SLC transmembrane transporters in resistance to cytotoxic drugs.

Nat Chem Biol 2020 04 9;16(4):469-478. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, Austria.

Solute carriers (SLCs) are the largest family of transmembrane transporters in humans and are major determinants of cellular metabolism. Several SLCs have been shown to be required for the uptake of chemical compounds into cellular systems, but systematic surveys of transporter-drug relationships in human cells are currently lacking. We performed a series of genetic screens in a haploid human cell line against 60 cytotoxic compounds representative of the chemical space populated by approved drugs. By using an SLC-focused CRISPR-Cas9 library, we identified transporters whose absence induced resistance to the drugs tested. This included dependencies involving the transporters SLC11A2/SLC16A1 for artemisinin derivatives and SLC35A2/SLC38A5 for cisplatin. The functional dependence on SLCs observed for a significant proportion of the screened compounds suggests a widespread role for SLCs in the uptake and cellular activity of cytotoxic drugs and provides an experimentally validated set of SLC-drug associations for a number of clinically relevant compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41589-020-0483-3DOI Listing
April 2020

Increased ATP synthesis might counteract hepatic lipid accumulation in acromegaly.

JCI Insight 2020 03 12;5(5). Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine III, and.

Patients with active acromegaly (ACRO) exhibit low hepatocellular lipids (HCL), despite pronounced insulin resistance (IR). This contrasts the strong association of IR with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the general population. Since low HCL levels in ACRO might be caused by changes in oxidative substrate metabolism, we investigated mitochondrial activity and plasma metabolomics/lipidomics in active ACRO. Fifteen subjects with ACRO and seventeen healthy controls, matched for age, BMI, sex, and body composition, underwent 31P/1H-7-T MR spectroscopy of the liver and skeletal muscle as well as plasma metabolomic profiling and an oral glucose tolerance test. Subjects with ACRO showed significantly lower HCL levels, but the ATP synthesis rate was significantly increased compared with that in controls. Furthermore, a decreased ratio of unsaturated-to-saturated intrahepatocellular fatty acids was found in subjects with ACRO. Within assessed plasma lipids, lipidomics, and metabolomics, decreased carnitine species also indicated increased mitochondrial activity. We therefore concluded that excess of growth hormone (GH) in humans counteracts HCL accumulation by increased hepatic ATP synthesis. This was accompanied by a decreased ratio of unsaturated-to-saturated lipids in hepatocytes and by a metabolomic profile, reflecting the increase in mitochondrial activity. Thus, these findings help to better understanding of GH-regulated antisteatotic pathways and provide a better insight into potentially novel therapeutic targets for treating NAFLD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/jci.insight.134638DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7141383PMC
March 2020

Type I Interferon Signaling Disrupts the Hepatic Urea Cycle and Alters Systemic Metabolism to Suppress T Cell Function.

Immunity 2019 12 26;51(6):1074-1087.e9. Epub 2019 Nov 26.

CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine or the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Lazarettgasse 14 AKH BT25.3, 1090 Vienna, Austria. Electronic address:

Infections induce complex host responses linked to antiviral defense, inflammation, and tissue damage and repair. We hypothesized that the liver, as a central metabolic hub, may orchestrate systemic metabolic changes during infection. We infected mice with chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), performed RNA sequencing and proteomics of liver tissue, and integrated these data with serum metabolomics at different infection phases. Widespread reprogramming of liver metabolism occurred early after infection, correlating with type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. Viral infection induced metabolic alterations of the liver that depended on the interferon alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR1). Hepatocyte-intrinsic IFNAR1 repressed the transcription of metabolic genes, including Otc and Ass1, which encode urea cycle enzymes. This led to decreased arginine and increased ornithine concentrations in the circulation, resulting in suppressed virus-specific CD8 T cell responses and ameliorated liver pathology. These findings establish IFN-I-induced modulation of hepatic metabolism and the urea cycle as an endogenous mechanism of immunoregulation. VIDEO ABSTRACT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2019.10.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6926485PMC
December 2019

MTHFD1 interaction with BRD4 links folate metabolism to transcriptional regulation.

Nat Genet 2019 06 27;51(6):990-998. Epub 2019 May 27.

CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, Austria.

The histone acetyl reader bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an important regulator of chromatin structure and transcription, yet factors modulating its activity have remained elusive. Here we describe two complementary screens for genetic and physical interactors of BRD4, which converge on the folate pathway enzyme MTHFD1 (methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase, cyclohydrolase and formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase 1). We show that a fraction of MTHFD1 resides in the nucleus, where it is recruited to distinct genomic loci by direct interaction with BRD4. Inhibition of either BRD4 or MTHFD1 results in similar changes in nuclear metabolite composition and gene expression; pharmacological inhibitors of the two pathways synergize to impair cancer cell viability in vitro and in vivo. Our finding that MTHFD1 and other metabolic enzymes are chromatin associated suggests a direct role for nuclear metabolism in the control of gene expression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0413-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6952269PMC
June 2019