Publications by authors named "Beth N McNulty"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Opioid Prescribing Patterns and Usage Following Cochlear Implantation.

Otol Neurotol 2020 08;41(7):922-928

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky.

Objective: To evaluate opioid prescribing patterns following cochlear implantation (CI) and assess factors associated with recurrent opioid use.

Study Design: Retrospective cohort study.

Setting: National pharmaceutical database recording opioid fulfillment (Truven Health Marketscan Commercial Claims and Encounters and Medicare Claims and Encounters database) PARTICIPANTS:: CI recipients who filled opioid prescriptions between January 2011 and December 2016. All patients had no previous opioid prescriptions filled 60 days before implantation and filled at least one opioid prescription within 1 week after surgery. Cohort 1 filled only one prescription and cohort 2 filled more than one prescription in the 12 months following CI. Univariate/multivariate analysis was performed to assess for associations with recurrent opioid use.

Main Outcome Measure(s): Opioid prescription details and recurrent opioid use.

Results: The study included 98 patients (cohort 1 = 57, cohort 2 (recurrent opioid use) = 41). Hydrocodone 5 mg was most frequently used. The average duration opioids were prescribed was 5.49 days with an average quantity of tablets of 36.1. Recurrent opioid use in cohort 2 was associated with both total morphine milligram equivalents (MME) prescribed/day in the first postoperative week (OR = 1.03, p = 0.01) and use of stronger MME opioids (OR = 7.20, p = 0.05).

Conclusion: Prescribing patterns following CI can influence recurrent opioid use in patients. Each additional tablet of hydrocodone 5 mg beyond 8 tablets/d or oxycodone 5 mg beyond 5.33 tablets/d, increases the likelihood of recurrent opioid use by 15 or 22.5%, respectively. Limiting opioids prescribed per day to no more than 40 MME could lower the likelihood of patients becoming recurrent opioid users postoperatively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000002674DOI Listing
August 2020

Trends in Opioid Usage Following Tympanoplasty and Mastoidectomy.

Otol Neurotol 2020 09;41(8):e1035-e1040

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky.

Objective: Evaluate opioid prescribing patterns following tympanoplasty/mastoidectomy and assess factors associated to recurrent opioid use.

Study Design: Retrospective cohort study.

Setting: National pharmaceutical database recording opioid fulfillment (Truven Health Marketscan Commercial Claims/Encounters and Medicare Claims/Encounters database).

Participants: Patients who 1) underwent tympanoplasty and/or mastoidectomy, 2) filled postoperative opioid prescriptions between 2011 and 2016, and 3) had no opioid prescriptions filled 60 days before surgery. Cohort 1 filled only one prescription and cohort 2 filled more than one prescription in the 12 months following surgery. Univariate/multivariate analysis was performed to assess for associations with recurrent opioid use.

Main Outcome Measure(s): Opioid prescription details and recurrent opioid use.

Results: The study included 398 patients (cohort 1 = 233, cohort 2 [recurrent opioid user] = 165). Hydrocodone 5 mg was most frequently used. The average duration opioids were prescribed was 5.8 days with an average quantity of tablets of 36.51. Recurrent opioid use in cohort 2 was associated with total morphine milligram equivalents prescribed/d in the first postoperative week (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, p < 0.001), post-op chronic pain disorder (OR = 2.00, p = 0.04), post-op substance abuse (OR = 2.12, p = 0.05), and post-op anxiety (OR = 1.96, p = 0.02).

Conclusion: Recurrent opioid use following tympanoplasty/mastoidectomy is associated with the amount prescribed per day but not opioid type or duration of treatment. Postoperative diagnoses such as chronic pain disorder, substance abuse, or anxiety could be predictive of or coexistent with recurrent opioid use. Limiting opioids prescribed per day and use of anti-inflammatory medications could decrease the risk of recurrent opioid use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000002709DOI Listing
September 2020

Response by the Authors of Original Article.

J Neurol Surg B Skull Base 2019 Jun 24;80(3):329. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Otology, Neurotology and Skull Base Surgery, Michigan Ear Institute, Farmington Hills, Michigan, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0038-1676833DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6534732PMC
June 2019

Audiology Telemedicine Evaluations: Potential Expanded Applications.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2019 07 5;161(1):63-66. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

1 Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.

There is underutilization of cochlear implants with delays in implantation linked to distance from implant centers. Telemedicine could connect cochlear implant specialists with patients in rural locations. We piloted telemedicine cochlear implant testing in a small study, largely composed of normal-hearing volunteers to trial this new application of teleaudiology technology. Thirteen subjects (8 with normal hearing and 5 with hearing loss ranging from mild to profound) underwent a traditional cochlear implant evaluation in person and then via telemedicine technology. Routine audiometry, word recognition testing, and Arizona Biological Test (AzBio) and consonant-nucleus-consonant (CNC) testing were performed. Mean (SD) percent difference in AzBio between in-person and remote testing was 1.7% (2.06%). Pure tone average (PTA), speech reception threshold (SRT), and word recognition were similar between methods. CNC testing showed a mean (SD) difference of 6.8% (10.2%) between methods. Testing conditions were acceptable to audiologists and subjects. Further study to validate this method in cochlear implant candidates and a larger population is warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599819835541DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6602851PMC
July 2019

Facial Nerve Schwannomas Mimicking as Vestibular Schwannomas.

J Neurol Surg B Skull Base 2017 Aug 30;78(4):283-287. Epub 2017 Jan 30.

Department of Otology, Neurotology and Skull Base Surgery, Michigan Ear Institute, Farmington Hills, Michigan, United States.

 The objective of this study was to identify preoperative and intraoperative findings that may aid in distinguishing facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) from vestibular schwannomas (VSs), particularly in cases limited to the internal auditory canal (IAC) and cerebellopontine angle (CPA).  This was a retrospective study.  This study was set at a Tertiary Referral Center.  Seventeen cases from October 2002 to July 2015 with an IAC/CPA mass presumed to be a VS who were found to have a FNS intraoperatively.  The main outcome measures included preoperative presentation, intraoperative findings, and subsequent intervention.  Preoperative hearing loss and imbalance were seen in 70.5 and 64.7%, respectively. Suspicious intraoperative findings included: facial nerve incorporated intimately with the tumor capsule in 12 cases; spontaneous action potentials noted while drilling the bony IAC in 3 cases; and action potentials noted on stimulation of the entire tumor capsule in 10 cases. The mean long-term facial function was House-Brackmann grade II and the mean length of follow-up was 4.86 years.  FNSs are rare and may be difficult to distinguish from VS preoperatively. Surgical findings that should raise concern include spontaneous action potentials during drilling the bony IAC, absence of a plane of dissection between the facial nerve and tumor, or stimulation of the tumor capsule.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0037-1598636DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5515658PMC
August 2017

Disparities in access to pediatric hearing health care.

Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2017 Oct;25(5):359-364

Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.

Purpose Of Review: There are significant disparities in care facing children with hearing loss. The objective of this review is to assess the current disparities in pediatric hearing healthcare delivery, describe the barriers of efficient and effective pediatric hearing health care, and explore the innovations to improve pediatric hearing healthcare delivery.

Recent Findings: Children with hearing loss from certain geographic regions or ethnic background are significantly delayed in diagnosis and treatment. Multiple patient characteristics (presentation of hearing loss), parental factors (insurance status, socioeconomic status, educational status, and travel distance to providers), and provider barriers (specialist shortage and primary care provider challenges) prevent the delivery of timely hearing health care. Advances, such as improved screening programs and the expansion of care through remote services, may help to ameliorate these disparities.

Summary: Timely identification and treatment of pediatric hearing loss is critical to prevent lifelong language complications. Children from vulnerable populations, such as rural residents, face significant disparities in care. Careful assessment of these barriers and implementation of culturally acceptable interventions are paramount to maximize communication outcomes of children with hearing loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MOO.0000000000000388DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973811PMC
October 2017