Publications by authors named "Berta Mosleh"

5 Publications

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Prognostic impact of PD-1 and PD-L1 expression in malignant pleural mesothelioma: an international multicenter study.

Transl Lung Cancer Res 2021 Apr;10(4):1594-1607

Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Background: Programmed cell death 1/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) immune-checkpoint blockade is a promising new therapeutic strategy in cancer. However, expression patterns and prognostic significance of PD-L1 and PD-1 are still controversial in human malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

Methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples from 203 MPM patients receiving standard treatment without immunotherapy were collected from 5 European centers. PD-L1 and PD-1 expression of tumor cells (TCs) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) were measured by immunohistochemistry and correlated with clinical parameters and long-term outcome.

Results: High (>10%) PD-L1 TC and PD-1 TILs expressions were found in 18 (8%) and 39 (24%) patients, respectively. PD-L1 was rarely expressed by TILs [≥1%, n=13 (8%); >10%, n=1]. No significant associations were found between the PD-L1 or PD-1 expression of TCs or TILs and clinicopathological parameters such as stage or histological subtype. Notably, patients with high (>10%) TC-specific PD-L1 expression exhibited significantly worse median overall survival (OS) (6.3 15.1 months of those with low TC PD-L1 expression; HR: 2.51, P<0.001). In multivariate cox regression analysis adjusted for clinical parameters, high TC PD-L1 expression (>10%) proved to be an independent negative prognostic factor for OS (HR: 2.486, P=0.005). There was no significant correlation between PD-L1 or PD-1 expression of TILs and OS.

Conclusions: In this multicenter cohort study, we demonstrate that high (>10%) PD-L1 expression of TCs independently predicts worse OS in MPM. Further studies are warranted to investigate the value of PD-L1/PD-1 expression as a marker for treatment response in MPM patients receiving immunotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/tlcr-20-1114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8107750PMC
April 2021

Malignant pleural mesothelioma: recent developments.

Curr Opin Oncol 2021 01;33(1):80-86

Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Program, Translational Thoracic Oncology, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Purpose Of Review: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, but aggressive tumor with still poor prognosis. In this article, we focus on recent developments in the management of MPM including diagnosis, staging, biomarkers, and treatment strategies.

Recent Findings: Molecular markers such as programmed death-ligand 1 (PDL-1), Breast Cancer gene 1-associated protein gene, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) have prognostic impact and should be considered for assessment in patient samples. In addition to histological subtype and tumor pattern, tumor volumetry plays an increasing important role in staging, assessment of treatment response, and prediction of survival. Several new blood-based biomarkers have been recently reported including peripheral blood DNA methylation, microRNAs, fibulin, and high-mobility group box 1, but have not been established in clinical routine use yet. Regarding treatment, targeted therapies, immunotherapy, and vaccination are considered as new promising strategies. Moreover, extended pleurectomy/decortication is favored over extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy represents a possible approach in combination with EPP and pleurectomy/decortication. Intracavitary treatment options are promising and deserve further investigations.

Summary: Overall, there has not been a real breakthrough in the treatment of MPM. Further research and clinical trials are needed to evaluate outcome and to identify new potential treatment candidates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCO.0000000000000697DOI Listing
January 2021

Long-term Survival After Salvage Surgery for a Giant Primary Rib Osteosarcoma.

Ann Thorac Surg 2021 01 15;111(1):e45-e47. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address:

A 29-year-old woman with a primary rib osteosarcoma declined treatment and was readmitted 20 months later in life-threatening condition caused by major local tumor progression with severe mediastinal shifting, and without distant metastases. She underwent extended tumor resection with palliative intent and recovered well after a prolonged course with post-pneumonectomy empyema. Further treatment was declined, and she presented again 4.5 years later with local chest wall recurrence that was completely resected. Currently, 7 years after diagnosis, the patient is free from disease. In this rare case, salvage surgery was associated with an unexpected favorable long-term outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2020.04.116DOI Listing
January 2021

Tailored modern GERD therapy - steps towards the development of an aid to guide personalized anti-reflux surgery.

Sci Rep 2019 12 16;9(1):19174. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Department of Surgery, Division of General Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel, 18-20 1090, Vienna, Austria.

As the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is rising, surgical treatment is continuously advancing in an effort to minimize side effects, whilst maintaining efficacy. From a database of patients that underwent anti-reflux surgery at our institution between 2015 and 2018, the last 25 consecutive patients that underwent electrical stimulation (ES), magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) and Nissen fundoplication (NF), following a personalized treatment decision aid, were included in a comparative analysis. After preoperative evaluation each patient was referred for an ES, MSA or NF based on esophageal motility, hiatal hernia (HH) size and the patients' preferences. Postoperative gastrointestinal symptoms and GERD-Health-related-Quality-of-Life were assessed. Preoperatively the median DCI (299 ES vs. 1523.5 MSA vs. 1132 NF, p = 0.001), HH size (0.5 cm ES vs. 1 cm MSA vs. 2 cm NF, p = 0.001) and presence of GERD-related symptoms differed significantly between the groups. The highest rate of postoperative dysphagia was seen after MSA (24%, p = 0.04), while the median GERD HRQL total score was equally distributed between the groups. The positive short-term postoperative outcome and patient satisfaction indicate that such an aid in treatment indication, based on esophageal motility, HH size and patient preference, represents a feasible tool for an ideal choice of operation and an individualized therapy approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-55510-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6914788PMC
December 2019

Persistent dysphagia is a rare problem after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.

Surg Endosc 2019 04 31;33(4):1196-1205. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Upper-GI-Research and Service, CCC-GET, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria.

Background: Although around 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are insufficiently treated with medical therapy, only 1% opt for surgical therapy. One of the reasons behind this multifactorial phenomenon is the described adverse effect of long-term dysphagia or gastric bloating syndrome after surgical treatment. Aim of this study was to evaluate the most common side effects associated with anti-reflux surgery, as well as long-term outcomes in a large cohort of highly surgically standardized patients after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF).

Methods: Out of a prospective patients' database including all patients that underwent anti-reflux surgery between 01/2003 and 01/2017 at our institution, 350 consecutive patients after highly standardized LNF were included in this study. A standardized interview was performed by one physician assessing postoperative gastrointestinal symptoms, proton pump inhibitor intake (PPI), GERD-Health-Related-Quality-of-Life (GERD-HRQL), Alimentary Satisfaction (AS), and patients' overall satisfaction.

Results: After a median follow-up of 4 years, persistent dysphagia (PD) after LNF was observed in 8 (2%) patients, while postoperative gas-bloat syndrome in 45 (12.7%) cases. Endoscopic dilatation was needed in 7 (2%) patients due to dysphagia, and 19 (5%) patients underwent revision surgery due to recurrence of GERD. The postoperative GERD-HRQL total score was significantly reduced (2 (IQR 0-4.3) vs. 19 (IQR 17-32); p < 0.000) and the median AS was 9/10. Heartburn relief was achieved in 83% of patients. Eighty-three percent of patients were free of PPI intake after follow-up, whereas 13% and 4% of the patients reported daily and irregular PPI use, respectively.

Conclusion: LNF is a safe and effective surgical procedure with low postoperative morbidity rates and efficient GERD-related symptom relief. PD does not represent a relevant clinical issue when LNF is performed in a surgical standardized way. These results should be the benchmark to which long-term outcomes of new surgical anti-reflux procedures are compared.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-018-6396-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6430753PMC
April 2019
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