Publications by authors named "Bernard Coche-Dequéant"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Stereotactic irradiation of non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases: evaluation of local and cerebral control in a large series.

Sci Rep 2020 07 8;10(1):11201. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Oscar Lambret, 59020, Lille Cedex, France.

Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of brain metastases (BM) results are often reported in the heterogeneous primitive population. Here, we report our experience in consecutively treated patients who underwent SRT alone for BM from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This retrospective analysis included consecutive patients with no history of cerebral treatment who underwent Cyberknife™ SRT for BM from NSCLC in our institution from 2007 to 2016. One hundred patients were included in the study, with a median follow-up of 33 months (20-64). Mean age was 63 years (SD ± 10); 88% had Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) > 70; 67% had unique BM; 18 patients received single-fraction SRT (20-25 Gy), and 82 received hypo-fractionated SRT (HSRT) (24-36 Gy in 3-5 fractions). We reported a complication rate of 17% (2% of G3-4). Median survival was 10.1 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8-13.9]. At 1 year, local and cerebral control rates were respectively 78.7% (95% CI 70-86.5%) and 43% (95% CI 33.5-53%). Thirty patients underwent salvage treatment (whole brain radiation therapy, n = 13; SRT, n = 14; surgery, n = 3). Cyberknife™-based SRT is an effective treatment associated with high local control rate with low morbidity for patients with NSCLC's BM. Close follow-up is necessary to perform salvage treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-68209-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7343798PMC
July 2020

Feasibility of Dose Escalation in Patients With Intracranial Pediatric Ependymoma.

Front Oncol 2019 21;9:531. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, Toulouse, France.

Pediatric ependymoma carries a dismal prognosis, mainly owing to local relapse within RT fields. The current prospective European approach is to increase the radiation dose with a sequential hypofractionated stereotactic boost. In this study, we assessed the possibility of using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), comparing VMAT vs. IMPT dose delivery. The cohort included 101 patients. The dose to planning target volume (PTV59.4) was 59.4/1.8 Gy, and the dose to SIB volume (PTV67.6) was 67.6/2.05 Gy. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined as the tumor bed plus residual tumor, clinical target volume (CTV59.4) was GTV + 5 mm, and PTV59.4 was CTV59.4 + 3 mm. PTV67.6 was GTV+ 3 mm. After treatment plan optimization, quality indices and doses to target volume and organs at risk (OARs) were extracted and compared with the standard radiation doses that were actually delivered (median = 59.4 Gy [50.4 59.4]). In most cases, the proton treatment resulted in higher quality indices ( < 0.001). Compared with the doses that were initially delivered, mean, and maximum doses to some OARs were no higher with SIB VMAT, and significantly lower with protons ( < 0.001). In the case of posterior fossa tumor, there was a lower dose to the brainstem with protons, in terms of V59 Gy, mean, and near-maximum (D2%) doses. Dose escalation with intensity-modulated proton or photon SIB is feasible in some patients. This approach could be considered for children with unresectable residue or post-operative FLAIR abnormalities, particularly if they have supratentorial tumors. It should not be considered for infratentorial tumors encasing the brainstem or extending to the medulla.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2019.00531DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6598548PMC
June 2019

Re-irradiation of locally recurrent pediatric intracranial ependymoma: Experience of the French society of children's cancer.

Radiother Oncol 2019 03 20;132:1-7. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Oncology Radiotherapy Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France.

Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate retrospectively the clinical results of re-irradiation for children with a locally recurrent brain ependymoma.

Methods: 33 full-dose re-irradiations were delivered to 31 children with a recurrent brain ependymoma after a standard treatment. Each child was followed up with clinical and MRI examinations. We evaluated overall survival, local recurrence free-survival and short term toxicity according to CTCAE 4.0 scale.

Results: With a median follow-up of 37 months (range, 0 to 107), median local recurrence free-survival was 31 months (range, 2 to 63) and median overall survival was 34 months (range, 3 to 63). It was significantly higher in patients who underwent surgery first, compared with re-irradiation only. Cumulated dosimetric data were available for 22 patients. On average, maximal BED to brain stem was 106,2 Gy (±35,4) for infratentorial re-irradiation. No acute toxicity grade >2 was reported and 1 case of brain radionecrosis treated successfully with steroids was reported after radiosurgery.

Conclusion: Local recurrence of brain ependymoma can be treated with full-dose re-irradiation, which can be hypofractionated with an acceptable short term toxicity in spite of high total doses delivered to OARs, especially brain stem.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2018.11.009DOI Listing
March 2019

Pediatric Localized Intracranial Ependymomas: A Multicenter Analysis of the Société Française de lutte contre les Cancers de l'Enfant (SFCE) from 2000 to 2013.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2018 09 24;102(1):166-173. Epub 2018 May 24.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Claudius Regaud, Institut Universitaire du, Cancer de Toulouse, Oncopole, Toulouse, France; Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, ToNIC, Université de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, Toulouse, France; Université Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France. Electronic address:

Purpose: The objective of this study was to analyze survival and prognostic factors for children, adolescents, and young adults treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) for intracranial ependymoma.

Methods And Materials: Between 2000 and 2013, 202 patients aged ≤25 years were treated in the 13 main French pediatric RT reference centers. Their medical records were reviewed for information, treatments received, and survival rates. All children had received postoperative RT- conformal, intensity modulated, or proton beam. In 2009, the prescribed standard dose in France rose from 54 Gy to 59.4 Gy.

Results: Median follow-up was 53.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 47-63.5). Median age at RT was 5 years (range 1-22), and 32% of the children treated were aged <3 years. Regarding treatment, 85.6% of patients underwent gross total resection, 62% of patients received conformal RT (vs 29% for intensity modulated RT and 8% for proton beam RT), 62.4% of patients received a dose >54 Gy, and 71% received chemotherapy. Of the 84 relapses, 75% were local. The cumulative incidence of local relapse was 24.4% (95% CI 18.2-31.2) at 3 years and 31.3% (95% CI 24-38.9) at 5 years. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 50.4% (95% CI 42.2-58) and 71.4% (95% CI 63.1-78.2). Tumor grade was the only prognostic factor for local relapse and DFS. Tumor grade, age, and extent of resection were independent prognostic factors for overall survival.

Conclusions: We confirmed several clinical and tumoral prognostic factors in a large French multicenter study. DFS for intracranial ependymoma remains low, and new biological and imaging markers are needed to distinguish among different subtypes, adapt treatments, and improve survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.05.036DOI Listing
September 2018

Hippocampal Sparing During Craniospinal Irradiation: What Did We Learn About the Incidence of Perihippocampus Metastases?

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2018 03 21;100(4):980-986. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lenval, Nice, France.

Purpose: To identify the incidence of patients with perihippocampal metastases to assess the risk of brain relapse when sparing the hippocampal area. Medulloblastoma (MB) represents 20% of pediatric brain tumors. For high-risk MB patients, the 3- to 5-year event-free survival rate has recently improved from 50% to >76%. Many survivors, however, experience neurocognitive side effects. Several retrospective studies of patients receiving whole brain irradiation (WBI) have suggested a relationship between the radiation dose to the hippocampus and neurocognitive decline. The hippocampal avoidance-WBI (HA-WBI) approach could partially reduce neurocognitive impairment in children treated for high-risk MB.

Methods And Materials: From 2008 to 2011, 51 patients with high-risk MB were treated according to the French trial primitive neuroectodermal tumor HR+5. Hippocampal contouring was manually generated on 3-dimensional magnetic resonance images according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0933 atlas. The distribution of metastases was assessed relative to the hippocampus: 0 to 5 mm for the first perihippocampal area and 5 to 15 mm for the rest of the perihippocampal area.

Results: The median patient age was 8.79 years (33% female). After a follow-up of 2.4 years, 43 patients were alive; 28 had had brain metastasis at diagnosis and 2 at relapse, with 16% in the first perihippocampal area and 43% in the rest of the perihippocampal area. Of the 18 patients without brain metastases at diagnosis, including M1 patients, none developed secondary lesions within the first or the rest of the perihippocampal area, after receiving 36 Gy. No clinical or biological factor was significantly associated with the development of perihippocampal metastases.

Conclusions: Our results suggest the HA-WBI strategy should be evaluated for the subgroup of high-risk MB patients without metastatic disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2017.12.265DOI Listing
March 2018

Interest of Supportive and Barrier Protective Skin Care Products in the Daily Prevention and Treatment of Cutaneous Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer.

Breast Cancer (Auckl) 2018 23;12:1178223417752772. Epub 2018 Jan 23.

CHU de Poitiers, Poitiers, France.

Purpose: As many as 50% of patients with cancer develop acute skin reactions to some degree with radiotherapy. Proactive skin care is often recommended to minimise these skin reactions and maintain the integrity of the epidermal barrier; nevertheless, no consensual guidelines are systematically used. This multicentre, observational, prospective study evaluated the tolerability and benefit of supportive and barrier protective skin care products in preventing radiotherapy-induced skin reactions in 253 women initiating radiotherapy (exclusive or adjuvant) for breast cancer.

Methods: Patients received a kit of 5 commercially available skin care products before the first radiotherapy treatment. The following variables were assessed: cutaneous adverse events, investigator-assessed skin reactions (oedema, erythema, dryness, desquamation) before and after radiotherapy course, investigator, and patient opinion on products benefit. Results were analysed by frequency of product use (heavy versus low).

Results: Average age was 60 years (range: 34-85). Over 92% of patients reported good to excellent tolerance on irradiated skin for each product. During the 6-week radiotherapy period, we observed that heavy product users had less skin reactions than the low users, particularly within 10 days of radiotherapy initiation (8% versus 18%;  = .031). Positive physician's opinion on product use was more frequent for high (66.6%) versus low (32%) users. Patient-assessed patient benefit index was generally >1, indicating relevant treatment benefit, with a tendency for better benefit in high versus low users.

Conclusions: These results support recommendations to use skin care products to minimise the impact of secondary cutaneous reactions with radiotherapy cancer treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1178223417752772DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5802618PMC
January 2018

Clinical Outcomes of Several IMRT Techniques for Patients With Head and Neck Cancer: A Propensity Score-Weighted Analysis.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2017 11 27;99(4):929-937. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

Radiation Oncology Department, Paris Descartes University, Paris Sorbonne Cité, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France. Electronic address:

Purpose: The Advanced Radiotherapy Oto-Rhino-Laryngologie (ART-ORL) study (NCT02024035) was performed to prospectively evaluate the clinical and economic aspects of helical TomoTherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for patients with head and neck cancer.

Methods And Materials: Fourteen centers participated in this prospective comparative study. Randomization was not possible based on the availability of equipment. Patients with epidermoid or undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma or epidermoid carcinoma of the oropharynx and oral cavity (T1-T4, M0, N0-N3) were included between February 2010 and February 2012. Only the results of the clinical study are presented in this report, as the results of the economic assessment have been published previously. Inverse probability of treatment weighting using the propensity score analysis was undertaken in an effort to adjust for potential bias due to nonrandomization. Locoregional control, cancer-specific survival, and overall survival assessed 18 months after treatment, as well as long-term toxicity and salivary function, were evaluated.

Results: The analysis included 166 patients. The following results are given after inverse probability of treatment weighting adjustment. The locoregional control rate at 18 months was significantly better in the TomoTherapy group: 83.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 72.5%-90.2%) versus 72.7% (95% CI, 62.1%-80.8%) in the RapidArc group (P=.025). The cancer-specific survival rate was better in the TomoTherapy group: 97.2% (95% CI, 89.3%-99.3%) versus 85.5% (95% CI, 75.8%-91.5%) in the RapidArc group (P=.014). No significant difference was shown in progression-free or overall survival. TomoTherapy induced fewer acute salivary disorders (P=.012). Posttreatment salivary function degradation was worse in the RapidArc group (P=.012).

Conclusions: TomoTherapy provided better locoregional control and cancer-specific survival than RapidArc treatment, with fewer salivary disorders. No significant difference was shown in progression-free and overall survival. These results should be explored in a randomized trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2017.06.2456DOI Listing
November 2017

Patterns of failure after radiotherapy for pediatric patients with intracranial ependymoma.

Radiother Oncol 2017 03 12;122(3):362-367. Epub 2017 Jan 12.

Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Université de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, France; Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Claudius Regaud, Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, France.

Purpose: To investigate the patterns of failure after radiotherapy for pediatric intracranial ependymoma and their correlation with dose parameters.

Methods: Between 2000 and 2013, 206 patients were treated in France. MRI scans at relapse were registered to the original planning CTs for topographic analysis of failure patterns. To compare relapse patients (RP) with non relapse patients (NRP), several dose parameters were derived from dose volume histograms.

Results: Over a median follow-up of 53.8months, 84 patients presented with relapse. Topographic analysis showed 50 patients with local relapse in the radiation field, 6 in the edge of field, 6 locoregional outside the field, 10 in the spine, 5 supratentorial and 7 local and distant. The median coverage, target coverage and homogeneity indices did not differ significantly between RP and NRP. The median volume of in-field relapse was 1.25cc [0.11, 27], with a median dose of 57.83Gy [50.04, 61.69].

Conclusions: Local relapse in the tumor bed and the higher dose regions was the predominant pattern of failure. Improving coverage of the target volume and increasing the dose to the high radioresistant regions, taking into consideration other clinical and biological pronostic factors, may be an effective way of reducing local failures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2016.12.025DOI Listing
March 2017

Erratum to: Low-dose brachytherapy for early stage penile cancer: a 20-year single-institution study (73 patients).

Radiat Oncol 2016 Sep 28;11(1):129. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Academic Radiation Oncology Department, Oscar Lambret Comprehensive Cancer Center, SIRIC ONCOLille and University Lille 2, 3 rue Fréderic Combemale, Lille, France.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5039895PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13014-016-0708-5DOI Listing
September 2016

Low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy boost for the treatment of anal canal cancers.

Brachytherapy 2017 Jan - Feb;16(1):230-235. Epub 2016 Sep 3.

Academic Radiation Oncology Department, Oscar Lambret Comprehensive Cancer Center, SIRIC ONCOLille and University Lille 2, Lille, France.

Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) or radio chemotherapy (RCT) for the treatment of anal canal cancers (ACC).

Methods And Materials: From 01, 1990 to 01, 2013, 103 patients (p) with ACC were treated with IBT after EBRT or RCT at our institution. Tumor node metastasis stage included Tis (1 p), T1 (18 p), T2 (46 p), T3 (33 p), and T4 (5 p). There was a lymph node involvement in 19 p. Ninety-nine patients presented with squamous cell carcinoma (95.5%) and seven with adenocarcinoma (4.5%). The median EBRT dose was 45 Gy (18-65 Gy). Thirty-nine patients (37.86%) received concomitant RCT. IBT was performed 0.9 months (0-4.38) after RCT or EBRT. The median IBT dose was 17.2 Gy (10-30 Gy).

Results: Within 4.8 years of followup, 15 p (14.6%) had an abdominoperineal amputation with definitive colostomy (11 p had locoregional failure, and 4 p had anal incontinence). Late toxicity was presented in 40 p (38.8%). Overall survival rates of 99% at 1 year, 89.4% at 3 years, and 85.7% at 5 years, and 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year local control rates of 97.9%, 95.4%, and 89.1%, respectively. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year colostomy-free rates were 98.9%, 94.0%, and 86.4%, respectively. No factors in the multivariate analysis were associated with the overall survival or any failure type.

Conclusions: IBT boost provides excellent local control with low colostomy rates and a late toxicity profile in ACC treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brachy.2016.07.007DOI Listing
July 2017

Cost Analysis of Complex Radiation Therapy for Patients With Head and Neck Cancer.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2016 06 6;95(2):654-62. Epub 2016 Feb 6.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Paris Descartes University, Paris Sorbonne Cité, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France. Electronic address:

Purpose: This cost analysis aimed to prospectively assess differences in costs between TomoTherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with head and neck cancer.

Methods And Materials: Economic data were gathered from a multicenter study. However, randomization was not possible due to the availability of equipment. Costs were calculated using the microcosting technique from the hospital's perspective (in 2013 euros), and the time horizon was radiation therapy. Only resources that entered the hospital production process and which were likely to vary between the strategies being compared were considered. Acute adverse events observed within the time horizon were also assessed.

Results: The cost analysis was based on a total of 173 patient treatments given between 2010 and 2012 in 14 French cancer centers: 73 patients were treated with TomoTherapy, 92 with VMAT RapidArc, and 8 with VMAT SmartArc. Estimated costs of SmartArc were removed from the comparison due to the small sample size. The mean ± SD cost per patient of the treatment planning phase was €314 (±€214) for TomoTherapy and €511 (±€590) for RapidArc. Mean costs ± SD per patient of irradiation reached €3144 (±€565) for TomoTherapy and €1350 (±€299) for RapidArc. The most sensitive parameter of irradiation was the annual operating time of accelerators. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals for the mean costs of irradiation were €3016 to €3272 for TomoTherapy and €1281 to €1408 for RapidArc. The number of acute adverse events during radiation therapy was not significantly different between strategies.

Conclusions: TomoTherapy appeared to be more expensive than RapidArc mainly due to the higher price of the accelerator, the higher costs of maintenance, and the longer duration of treatment sessions. Because strategies were not significantly different in clinical effect, RapidArc appeared to be the strategy to be recommended at this stage of knowledge.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2016.02.013DOI Listing
June 2016

Post-surgical management of non-functioning pituitary adenoma.

Ann Endocrinol (Paris) 2015 Jul 23;76(3):228-38. Epub 2015 Jun 23.

Service d'endocrinologie et des maladies de la reproduction, hôpital de Bicêtre, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 94275 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France; UMR S1185, faculté de médecine Paris-Sud, université Paris-Sud, 94276 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France; INSERM U1185, 94276 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.

Post-surgical surveillance of non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA) is based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 or 6 months then 1 year. When there is no adenomatous residue, annual surveillance is recommended for 5 years and then at 7, 10 and 15 years. In case of residue or doubtful MRI, prolonged annual surveillance monitors any progression. Reintervention is indicated if complete residue resection is feasible, or for symptomatic optic pathway compression, to create a safety margin between the tumor and the optic pathways ahead of complementary radiation therapy (RT), or in case of post-RT progression. In case of residue, unless the tumor displays elevated growth potential, it is usually recommended to postpone RT until progression is manifest, as efficacy is comparable whether treatment is immediate or postponed. The efficacy of the various RT techniques in terms of tumor volume control is likewise comparable. RT-induced hypopituitarism is frequent, whatever the technique. The choice thus depends basically on residue characteristics: size, delineation, and proximity to neighboring radiation-sensitive structures. Reduced rates of vascular complications and secondary brain tumor can be hoped for with one-dose or hypofractionated stereotactic RT, but there has been insufficient follow-up to provide evidence. Somatostatin analogs and dopaminergic agonists have yet to demonstrate sufficient efficacy. Temozolomide is an option in aggressive NFPA resistant to surgery and RT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ando.2015.04.003DOI Listing
July 2015

Multi institutional phase II study of concomitant stereotactic reirradiation and cetuximab for recurrent head and neck cancer.

Radiother Oncol 2013 Nov 18;109(2):281-5. Epub 2013 Nov 18.

Centre Oscar Lambret, University Lille II & ONCOLille Consortium, France. Electronic address:

Purpose: Recurrent head and neck cancer is associated to a poor survival prognosis. A high toxicity rate is demonstrated when surgery and/or radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy are combined. Furthermore, the duration of treatment is often not ethically compatible with the expected survival (median survival<1year). Normal tissues tolerance limits the use of reirradiation and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could offer precise irradiation while sparing healthy tissues. After completion of a feasibility study, results of a multicentric study (Lille, Nancy & Nice) using SBRT with cetuximab are reported. The aim of the study was to deliver non toxic short course SBRT (2weeks) in order to get the same local control as the one demonstrated with longer protocols.

Methods And Materials: Patients with inoperable recurrent, or new primary tumor in a previously irradiated area, were included (WHO<3). Reirradiation (RT) dose was 36Gy in six fractions of 6Gy to the 85% isodose line covering 95% of the PTV with 5 injections of concomitant cetuximab (CT). All patients had previous radiotherapy, 85% had previous surgery and 48% previous chemotherapy.

Results: Between 11/2007 and 08/2010, 60 were included (46 men and 14 women), 56 received CT+RT, 3 were not treated and 1 received only CT. Median age was 60 (42-87)) and all 56 patients had squamous carcinoma and received concomitant cetuximab. Mean time between previous radiotherapy and the start of SBRT was 38months. Cutaneous toxicity was observed for 41 patients. There was one toxic death from hemorrhage and denutrition. Median follow-up was 11.4months. At 3months, response rate was 58.4% (95% CI: 43.2-72.4%) and disease control rate was 91.7% (95% CI: 80.0-97.7%). The one-year OS rate was 47.5% (95% CI: 30.8-62.4).

Conclusion: These results suggest that short SBRT with cetuximab is an effective salvage treatment with good response rate in this poor prognosis population with previously irradiated HNC. Treatment is feasible and, with appropriate care to limiting critical structure, acute toxicities are acceptable. This combination may be the reference treatment is this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2013.08.012DOI Listing
November 2013

Salvage stereotactic reirradiation with or without cetuximab for locally recurrent head-and-neck cancer: a feasibility study.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2012 Sep 11;84(1):203-9. Epub 2012 Feb 11.

Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille, France.

Purpose: Normal tissues tolerance limits the use of reirradiation for recurrent head-and-neck cancers (HNC). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could offer precise irradiation while sparing healthy tissues. Results of a feasibility study using SBRT with or without cetuximab are reported for reirradiation of recurrent primary HNC.

Methods And Materials: Patients with inoperable recurrent, or new primary tumor, in a previously irradiated area were included. Reirradiation dose was 36 Gy in six fractions of 6 Gy to the 85% isodose line covering 95% of the planning target volume. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma received concomitant cetuximab.

Results: Between June 2007 and January 2010, 40 patients were prospectively treated for 43 lesions. Median age was 60 and median tumor size was 29 mm. Fifteen patients received concomitant cetuximab and 1 received concomitant cisplatin. Median follow-up was 25.6 months with 34 patients evaluable for tumor response. Median overall survival was 13.6 months and response rate was 79.4% (15 complete and 12 partial responses). Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 4 patients.

Conclusion: These results suggest that short SBRT with or without cetuximab is an effective salvage treatment with good response rate in this poor prognosis population with previously irradiated HNC. Treatment is feasible and, with appropriate care to limiting critical structure, acute toxicities are acceptable. A prospective multicenter Phase II trial of SRT and concomitant cetuximab in recurrent HNC squamous cell carcinoma is ongoing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2011.11.054DOI Listing
September 2012

Use of conventional fractionation with cyberknife in children: a report of 5 cases.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2010 Aug;32(6):472-5

Département Universitaire de Radiothérapie, CyberKnife Nord-Ouest, Centre Oscar Lambret, CLCC, Université Lille II daggerUnité d'Oncologie Pédiatrique, Centre Oscar Lambret, CLCC, Lille.

Summary: The use of stereotactic radiotherapy with CyberKnife (Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, CA) in adults is becoming more and more established. For children, there is no such consensus and the appropriate approach to this type of treatment is still debated. In the meantime, there seems to be a number of certain pediatric cases in which the use of CyberKnife within very strict limits is potentially justified. Here, we report the feasibility of and acute tolerance to radiotherapy with CyberKnife using conventional fractionation in 5 children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPH.0b013e3181e79332DOI Listing
August 2010

External beam radiation therapy followed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy for inoperable superficial esophageal carcinoma.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2006 Aug;65(5):1456-61

Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, University Lille II, Lille, France.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and tolerance of external beam radiotherapy followed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy in inoperable patients with superficial esophageal cancer.

Patients And Methods: From November 1992 to May 1999, 66 patients with superficial esophageal cancer were treated with exclusive radiotherapy. The median age was 60 years (range, 41-85). Fifty-three percent of them were ineligible for surgery owing to synchronous or previously treated head-and-neck cancer. Most of the patients (n = 49) were evaluated with endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) or computed tomography (CT). The mean doses of external beam radiotherapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy were 57.1 Gy (+/-4.83) and 8.82 Gy (+/-3.98), respectively. The most frequently used regimen was 60 Gy followed by 7 Gy at 5 mm depth in two applications.

Results: Among patients evaluated with EUS or CT, the complete response rate was 98%. The 3-, 5-, and 7-year survival rates were 57.9%, 35.6%, and 26.6%, respectively. Median overall survival was 3.8 years. The 5-year relapse-free survival and cause-specific survival were 54.6% and 76.9%. The 5-year overall, relapse-free, and cause-specific survival of the whole population of 66 patients was 33%, 53%, and 77%, respectively. Local failure occurred in 15 of 66 patients; 6 were treated with brachytherapy. Severe late toxicity (mostly esophageal stenosis) rated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale occurred in 6 of 66 patients (9%).

Conclusion: This well tolerated regimen may be a therapeutic alternative for inoperable patients with superficial esophageal cancer. Only a randomized study could be able to check the potential benefit of brachytherapy after external beam radiation in superficial esophageal cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.02.049DOI Listing
August 2006

Exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy in 279 patients with T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2005 Oct;63(2):434-40

Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, 3 rue Frédéric Combemale, 59000 Lille, France.

Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results obtained with (192)Ir low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma.

Patients And Methods: Between December 1979 and January 1998, 279 patients with T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma were treated by exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy, with or without neck dissection. (192)Ir brachytherapy was performed according to the "Paris system" with a median total dose of 60 Gy (median dose rate, 0.5 Gy/h).

Results: Overall survival was 74.3% and 46.6% at 2 and 5 years. Local control was 79.1% at 2 years and regional control, respectively, 75.9% and 69.5% at 2 and 5 years (Kaplan-Meier method). Systematic dissection revealed 44.6% occult node metastases, and histologic lymph node involvement was identified as the main significant factor for survival. Complication rate was 16.5% (Grade 3, 2.9%). Half of the patients presented previous and/or successive malignant tumor (ear-nose-throat, esophagus, or bronchus).

Conclusion: Exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for T2 tongue carcinoma. Regional control and survival are excellent in patients undergoing systematic neck dissection, which is mandatory in our experience because of a high rate of occult lymph node metastases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.02.014DOI Listing
October 2005

Treatment of laryngeal cancer: the permanent challenge.

Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2004 Oct;4(5):913-20

Head and Neck Department, Centre Oscar Lambret, 3, rue Combemale, 59020 Lille, France.

There are many options to treat larynx cancers. Throughout the 20th century, surgical research has provided many partial surgery techniques (either open surgery or endoscopic CO2 surgery). In parallel, the modification of radiotherapy schedules has notably improved the local control with definitive irradiation. The appearance of active chemotherapy regimens has also modified the concept of treatment for advanced disease, allowing a decrease in the total indications of laryngectomy, although this remains the treatment of choice in some cases. The selection of the most appropriate treatment is based on a multidisciplinary approach. Early diseases may be treated by open surgery, endoscopic laser CO2 surgery or irradiation. Some advanced diseases may be treated by partial surgery, but the majority are theoretically candidates for radical surgery when resectable. In many instances, but not in all, chemotherapy-based larynx-preserving protocols may avoid performing such mutilating surgery. When inoperable, larynx cancers are better treated by combined chemotherapy and irradiation when the performance status of the patient is compatible with such an intensive regimen.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/14737140.4.5.913DOI Listing
October 2004

MRI definition of target volumes using fuzzy logic method for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2003 Jan;55(1):225-33

Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille, France.

Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) volume determination is one of the most important problems in conformal radiation therapy. Techniques of volume determination from tomographic medical imaging are usually based on two-dimensional (2D) contour definition with the result dependent on the segmentation method used, as well as on the user's manual procedure. The goal of this work is to describe and evaluate a new method that reduces the inaccuracies generally observed in the 2D contour definition and 3D volume reconstruction process.

Methods And Materials: This new method has been developed by integrating the fuzziness in the 3D volume definition. It first defines semiautomatically a minimal 2D contour on each slice that definitely contains the volume and a maximal 2D contour that definitely does not contain the volume. The fuzziness region in between is processed using possibility functions in possibility theory. A volume of voxels, including the membership degree to the target volume, is then created on each slice axis, taking into account the slice position and slice profile. A resulting fuzzy volume is obtained after data fusion between multiorientation slices. Different studies have been designed to evaluate and compare this new method of target volume reconstruction and a classical reconstruction method. First, target definition accuracy and robustness were studied on phantom targets. Second, intra- and interobserver variations were studied on radiosurgery clinical cases.

Results: The absolute volume errors are less than or equal to 1.5% for phantom volumes calculated by the fuzzy logic method, whereas the values obtained with the classical method are much larger than the actual volumes (absolute volume errors up to 72%). With increasing MRI slice thickness (1 mm to 8 mm), the phantom volumes calculated by the classical method are increasing exponentially with a maximum absolute error up to 300%. In contrast, the absolute volume errors are less than 12% for phantom volumes calculated by the fuzzy logic method. On radiosurgery clinical cases, target volumes defined by the fuzzy logic method are about half of the size of volumes defined by the classical method. Also, intra- and interobserver variations slightly decrease with the fuzzy logic method, resulting in the definition of a better common volume fraction.

Conclusion: Our fuzzy logic method shows accurate, robust, and reproducible results on phantoms and clinical targets imaged on MRI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0360-3016(02)03829-4DOI Listing
January 2003
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