Publications by authors named "Bernadette Pendergraph"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Managing Fractures and Sprains.

Prim Care 2022 Mar 5;49(1):145-161. Epub 2022 Jan 5.

Department of Family Medicine, Offutt AFB/UNMC Family Medicine Residency Program, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Medicine, 983075 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-3075, USA.

Primary care physicians are often the first to evaluate patients with extremity injuries. Identification of fractures and sprains and their proper management is paramount. After appropriate imaging is obtained, immobilization and determination of definitive management, either nonoperative or operative, is critical. Appropriate immobilization is imperative to injury healing. Nonsurgical management of upper extremity fractures often uses slings, short-term splinting, gutter splints, and/or short or long arm casts. Initial fracture stabilization of the lower extremity is usually accomplished with a posterior splint. Definitive management usually uses controlled ankle movement walker boots, hard-sole shoes, or casting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pop.2021.10.007DOI Listing
March 2022

Rehabilitation Considerations in Overhead Sports.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2022 Feb;21(2):37-38

Division of Sports Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Harbor City, CA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000930DOI Listing
February 2022

Detection and evaluation of chronic kidney disease.

Am Fam Physician 2005 Nov;72(9):1723-32

Department of Family Medicine, Harbor-University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, California, USA.

Chronic kidney disease affects approximately 19 million adult Americans, and its incidence is increasing rapidly. Diabetes and hypertension are the underlying causes in most cases of chronic kidney disease. Evidence suggests that progression to kidney failure can be delayed or prevented by controlling blood sugar levels and blood pressure and by treating proteinuria. Unfortunately, chronic kidney disease often is overlooked in its earliest, most treatable stages. Guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) recommend estimating glomerular filtration rate and screening for albuminuria in patients with risk factors for chronic kidney disease, including diabetes, hypertension, systemic illnesses, age greater than 60 years, and family history of chronic kidney disease. The glomerular filtration rate, calculated by using a prediction equation, detects chronic kidney disease more accurately than does the serum creatinine level alone; the glomerular filtration rate also is used for disease staging. In most clinical situations, analysis of random urine samples to determine the albumin-creatinine or protein-creatinine ratio has replaced analysis of timed urine collections. When chronic kidney disease is detected, an attempt should be made to identify and treat the specific underlying condition(s). The KDOQI guidelines define major treatment goals for all patients with chronic kidney disease. These goals include slowing disease progression, detecting and treating complications, and managing cardiovascular risk factors. Primary care physicians have an important role in detecting chronic kidney disease early, in instituting measures to slow disease progression, and in providing timely referral to a nephrologist.
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November 2005

Medical coverage for track and field events.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2005 Jun;4(3):150-3

Harbor-UCLA Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship, 1403 Lomita Boulevard, Harbor City, CA 90710, USA.

Providing medical coverage at a track and field event is similar to other spectator events, but there are some important differences. With simultaneous events occurring over a large area, reliable communication with quick access to all event sites is mandatory. Preparation needs to include a prearranged emergency response plan for each event. Because field events involve throwing heavy and sometimes sharp objects (discus, hammer, shot put, and javelin) or landing in a cushioned pit (high jump, pole vault), sites need well-demarcated, constantly monitored boundaries with properly installed, well-maintained safety equipment. All personnel involved in monitoring these events should be educated on proper procedure in managing potential head or neck injuries. Event officials must also remained focused on their tasks, avoiding the distractions that simultaneous events can cause. Because most events are outdoors, appropriate protection and recovery sites for heat, cold, and sun exposure should be arranged.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.csmr.0000306198.59617.3dDOI Listing
June 2005

Exercise during pregnancy: what do we really know?

Am Fam Physician 2004 Mar;69(5):1053, 1056

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March 2004
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