Publications by authors named "Berna Elya"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Binahong ( (Tenore) Steen.) Leaf Extract Modulates Fatty Acids and Amino Acids to Lower Blood Glucose in High-Fat Diet-Induced Diabetes Mellitus Rats.

Adv Pharmacol Pharm Sci 2021 28;2021:8869571. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI, Depok 16424, West Java, Indonesia.

Patients with diabetes are 1.6 times more likely to use complementary alternative medicine than nondiabetic patients. Previous studies have shown that (Tenore) Steen. () leaf extract has the capacity to lower blood glucose, but the actual mechanisms are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we explored the effect of leaf extract on the metabolism of fatty acids and amino acids. Six-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six experimental groups ( = 5 per group). Two groups were fed with a regular diet or a high-fat diet (HFD) for six weeks. The regular diet and HFD groups were administered with 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose as a vehicle, and HFD rats were also fed with a suspension of glibenclamide (0.51 mg/kg body weight (BW)) or leaf extract (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg BW). During the whole treatment, BW and food intake were recorded weekly. The rats were euthanized seven weeks after treatment. Blood glucose was evaluated by spectrophotometry, while fatty acids and amino acids were evaluated using a gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID). All doses of administration reduced blood glucose significantly, and 50 mg/kg BW was most effective in lowering blood glucose, similar to the effects of glibenclamide. leaf extract affected the levels of medium-chain fatty acids, especially at 50 mg/kg BW. In contrast, glibenclamide affected long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) to lower blood glucose. Based on the analysis conducted, we conclude that administration of leaf extract can decrease blood glucose levels by regulating fatty acid metabolism and that a dose of 50 mg/kg BW in rats was the optimal dose.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/8869571DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8100415PMC
April 2021

Antielastase Activity of Macassar Kernels ( Stem Extract and Skin Elasticity Evaluation of Its Topical Gel Formulation.

Adv Pharmacol Pharm Sci 2021 21;2021:6690029. Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia.

Background: Macassar kernels ( L.) has potential as an antiaging agent as it has antielastase activity, especially its stem extract which has best percent inhibition compared to its leaves and fruit extract. Moreover, the antiaging agent can be commonly used in the form of gel for topical applications. Hence, formulation of HEC-based topical gel from the stem extract of Macassar kernels was conducted. This study aims to determine the antielastase activity of the stem extract of Macassar kernels and evaluate the skin elasticity of its topical gel formulation by conducting dermatological safety and skin antiaging efficacy test.

Methods: The stem extract was in vitro tested for antielastase activity using a microplate reader. Then, a formulation of a topical gel containing stem extract was made. Five stages of quality control, which consisted of an organoleptic test, homogeneity test, pH measurement, viscosity measurement, and physicochemical stability test, were conducted to ensure the quality of topical gel formulation. Last, clinical studies were conducted to evaluate the dermatological safety and antiaging efficacy of gel preparation containing stem extract of . The stem extract provided antielastase activity (IC50 = 245.68 g/mL), and its polyphenol was valued at 23.28 ± 1.52 mg GAE/g). The gel containing 10% stem extract had better stability than the gel containing 5% stem extract. The dermatology safety test and efficacy test results indicated that the topical gel containing 10% stem extract did not cause any skin irritation and significantly improved skin elasticity ( < 0.05). In the treatment group, the moisture parameter was significantly changed on day 14 ( < 0.0001), day 21 ( < 0.0001), and day 29 ( < 0.0001). The elasticity parameter was also changed significantly on day 14 (=0.0485), day 21 (=0.0537), and day 29 (=0.0002).

Conclusion: The stem extract of has potential antielastase activity. The topical gel containing stem extract also has potential antielastase activity by increasing the skin moisture and enhancing skin elasticity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/6690029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8084666PMC
April 2021

Hypoglycemic Effect of a Combined and Extract in Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

Adv Pharmacol Pharm Sci 2020 10;2020:8856129. Epub 2020 Nov 10.

Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Jakarta, Indonesia.

Introduction: Researchers usually use herbal combinations to explore and develop traditional medicine to obtain additional benefits in the treatment of diseases, including diabetes. This study aims to evaluate the hypoglycemic effect of the combination of (Burm. f.) Wall ex Nees and Linn extract (APCSE) on diabetes-induced rats. There has not been sufficient research on this combination; however, single extract studies of these plants have been widely conducted.

Materials And Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats (160-200 g) were induced by injecting a low dose of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg BW) twice and fed with a high-fat diet containing 25% fat, whereas control animals received only standard feed. Rats were treated with APCSE at doses of 100 mg and 200 mg/kg BW for seven days and compared to the APE and CSE groups treated with the extract at 100 mg, respectively. For the control group, rats were treated with metformin with a dose of 250 mg/kg. The antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects were determined by measuring blood glucose levels and lipid profiles (cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and LDL). To assess the impact of the extract on pancreatic and adipose tissue, the number of pancreatic beta cells and adipocytes was evaluated through histopathological and immunohistochemical study. . In a nonfasting state, the blood glucose change in APCSE 200 mg was 18.65% and was significantly lower from the DM group. However, a single extract of APE and CSE showed lower fasting blood glucose levels compared to the combined extract. Lipid profiles show no significant differences in cholesterol levels between groups; however, all treatment groups, including metformin, showed higher triglyceride levels. The APE-treated group showed significantly lower HDL and LDL, whereas CSE only showed lower LDL. The -cell number was significantly higher after treatment with single extract CSE. The CSE and the combined extract groups showed hyperplasia adipocytes.

Conclusion: The combined extract of APCSE has a moderate antihyperglycemic effect; however, a single extract may have better potential than the combined extract.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/8856129DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7671818PMC
November 2020

Inhibition of pancreatic elastase and by leaves extract and its constituents.

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2020 Jul-Sep;12(3):317-323. Epub 2020 Jul 18.

Department of Phytochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia.

Objective: Elastases are protease enzymes, which mainly hydrolyze proteins of the connective tissue, so they have a significant impact on human disease. is one of the species found in Indonesian mountains, and it has potential as an elastase inhibitor. The objective of this research was to examine the elastase inhibitor activity of leaves and to dock different ligands of its constituents against target protein of Porcine Pancreatic Elastase (PPE) receptor.

Method: Dried leaves powder of was extracted using Soxhlet apparatus with -hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol. The extract was evaporated, and elastase inhibitor activity was determined using PPE with the quercetin used as control positive. Selected nine constituents of were evaluated on the docking behavior of elastase receptor using Protein-Ligand ANT System (PLANTS) computational software with PPE enzyme with Protein Data Bank (PDB) file 1BRU.

Result: The methanol extract showed significantly inhibited elastase with IC50 186.13 μg/mL, but ethyl acetate extract showed weak activity, and -hexane extract did not show any activity. Docking studies and binding free energy calculations and hydrogen bonding with some amino acids revealed that ellagic acid showed the least binding energy for the target enzyme.

Conclusion: This research has opened new insights into understanding that constituents of methanol extract are potential inhibitors against elastase, and suggested the active compound is ellagic acid.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jpbs.JPBS_271_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7574744PMC
July 2020

Secondary metabolites from Pierre leaves (Clusiaceae).

Nat Prod Res 2020 Jun 12:1-7. Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

Two new glycerol esters, ()-2-hydroxy-3-(octanoyloxy)propyl tetracosanoate () and ()-3-((()-11-acetoxy octadecanoyl)oxy)propane-1,2-diyl diacetate (), and eight known compounds, docosanedioic acid (), 2,5-dimethylnonadecane (), lupeol (), stigmasterol (), β-sitosterol (), heptadecanoic acid (), hexanedioic acid, 1,6-bis[(2)-ethylhexyl] ester (), and 1,3-di--[2',2'-di-(-phenylene)] () were isolated from the leaves of Pierre, collected from Indonesia. Structural analysis of the isolates was performed using 1D- and 2D-NMR, LC- and GC-MS, IR, polarimetry, and UV-visible spectroscopic methods. Cytotoxicity assessments, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) analysis of the isolates, were also completed. Lupeol was the only compound found active with an IC value of 19.2µM against HT-29 colon cancer cells. Significant ROS inhibition and induction activity was observed for compounds and , respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2020.1777117DOI Listing
June 2020

The Antiviral Effect of Indonesian Medicinal Plant Extracts Against Dengue Virus In Vitro and In Silico.

Pathogens 2019 Jun 22;8(2). Epub 2019 Jun 22.

Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia-Cipto Mangukusumo Hospital, Jalan Pengangsaan Timur No. 16, Jakarta 10320, Indonesia.

Dengue infections are still a worldwide burden, especially in Indonesia. There is no specific medication against the dengue virus. Recently, many types of research have been conducted to discover a new drug for dengue virus using natural resource extracts. Indonesia, as a tropical country, has a wide biodiversity. There are several medicinal plants in Indonesia that are believed to possess anti-dengue activity, such as , and plants. We conducted an in vitro laboratory experiment of several extracts from Indonesian herbs combined with in silico analysis. The extracts were evaluated for safety and antiviral activity in Huh7it-1 cell lines, using a single dose of 20 µg/mL and dose-dependent (5, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 160 µg/mL) of plant extracts against dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) NGC strain. The DMSO 0.1% was used as a negative control. The cytotoxic aspect was assessed by counting the cell viability, while the antiviral activity was calculated by counting the average inhibition. The selectivity index (SI) of plant extracts were performed from a ratio of CC/EC value. In silico analysis was conducted to determine the free energy of binding between NS5 of dengue virus with bioactive compounds contained in , and extract plants. We determined that all extracts were not toxic against Huh7it-1 cell lines. The methanolic extracts of , and showed inhibition of DENV-2 at a dose of 20 µg/mL to 96.5%, 98.9%, and 122.7%, respectively. The dose-dependent effects showed that has the best inhibition activity towards DENV-2. Molecular docking result showed that artesunic acid within has the best free energy of binding (-7.2 kcal/mol), followed by homoegonol (-7.1 kcal/mol) which was slightly different from artesunic acid among others. The methanolic extracts of , and showed prospective anti-dengue activities both in vitro and in silico. Future research should be conducted to find the pure extracts of all useful herbs as a new candidate of antiviral drug.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8020085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6631455PMC
June 2019

α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity from Ethyl Acetate Extract of (L.) Spreng Stem Bark Containing Triterpenoids.

Pharmacogn Mag 2017 Oct-Dec;13(52):590-594. Epub 2017 Nov 13.

Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia.

Background: Buni ( [L.] Spreng) has been used as a traditional antidiabetic agent in Asia.

Objective: The mechanism of antidiabetic properties was studied in this study by determine its α-glucosidase inhibitory activity.

Method: Inhibition of α-glucosidase was performed in all fraction of Buni stem bark with acarbose and miglitol as standards. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC) value of acarbose and miglitol was 5.75 and 59.76 μg/mL respectively while ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction was the most active fraction with IC of 19.33 μg/mL. Three isolates (B1, B2, and B3) were found in the EtOAc fraction and elucidated by infrared, hydrogen-nuclear magnetic resonance, carbon-nuclear magnetic resonance, and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance.

Result: The chemical structures of the isolates were identified by the spectrum then compared with literature which concluded that B1 is friedelin, B2 is β-sitosterol, and B3 is betulinic acid. Inhibition of the α-glucosidase assay showed IC values of B1, B2, and B3 were 19.51, 49.85, and 18.49 μg/mL, respectively.

Summary: α-Glucosidase inhibitory activity assay was performed in n-hexane, ethyl acetate (EtOAc), methanol fraction of Buni ( (L.) Spreng) stem bark and miglitolEtOAc fraction from the liquid chromatography has the highest inhibitory activity against α-glucosidaseThe chemical structures of the isolates were identified by the spectrums infrared, hydrogen-nuclear magnetic resonance, carbon-nuclear magnetic resonance, and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, then compared with literature which concluded that B1 is friedelin, B2 is β-sitosterol, and B3 is betulinic acidBetulinic acid and friedelin showed the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. IC: Half maximal inhibitory concentration; H-NMR: Hydrogen-nuclear magnetic resonance; C-NMR: Carbon nuclear magnetic resonance; 2D-NMR: Two dimensional-nuclear magnetic resonance; EtOH: Ethanol; EtOAc: Ethyl acetate; MeOH: Methanol; CHCl: Chloroform; DMSO: Dimethyl sulfoxide; EtF: Ethyl acetate fraction; NaCO: Sodium carbonate; IR: Infrared; TGR5: Transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5; EC: Half maximal effective concentration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/pm.pm_25_17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5701396PMC
November 2017

Manzamine Alkaloids from an Acanthostrongylophora sp. Sponge.

J Nat Prod 2017 05 28;80(5):1575-1583. Epub 2017 Apr 28.

Natural Products Research Institute, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University , San 56-1, Sillim, Gwanak, Seoul 151-742, Korea.

Five new manzamine alkaloids (1-5) and new salt forms of two known manzamines (6 and 7), along with seven known compounds (8-14) of the same structural class, were isolated from an Indonesian Acanthostrongylophora sp. sponge. On the basis of the results of combined spectroscopic analyses, the structure of kepulauamine A (1) was determined to possess an unprecedented pyrrolizine moiety, while others were functional group variants of known manzamines. These compounds exhibited weak cytotoxicity, moderate antibacterial activity, and mild inhibition against the enzyme isocitrate lyase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jnatprod.7b00121DOI Listing
May 2017

Antimicrobial activity of green tea extract against isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Asian Pac J Trop Biomed 2013 Aug;3(8):663-7; discussion 666

Laboratory of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Indonesia, Depok 16424, Indonesia.

Objective: To evaluate antibacterial activity of the Indonesian water soluble green tea extract, Camellia sinensis, against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (MRSA) and multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-P. aeruginosa).

Methods: Antimicrobial activity of green tea extract was determined by the disc diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the twofold serial broth dilutions method. The tested bacteria using in this study were the standard strains and multi-drug resistant clinical isolates of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, obtained from Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia.

Results: The results showed that the inhibition zone diameter of green tea extracts for S. aureus ATCC 25923 and MRSA were (18.970 ± 0.287) mm, and (19.130 ± 0.250) mm respectively. While the inhibition zone diameter for P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and MDR-P. aeruginosa were (17.550 ± 0.393) mm and (17.670 ± 0.398) mm respectively. The MIC of green tea extracts against S. aureus ATCC 25923 and MRSA were 400 µg/mL and 400 µg/mL, respectively, whereas the MIC for P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and MDR-P. aeruginosa were 800 µg/mL, and 800 µg/mL, respectively.

Conclusions: Camellia sinensis leaves extract could be useful in combating emerging drug-resistance caused by MRSA and P. aeruginosa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2221-1691(13)60133-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3703562PMC
August 2013

Screening of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity from some plants of Apocynaceae, Clusiaceae, Euphorbiaceae, and Rubiaceae.

J Biomed Biotechnol 2012 7;2012:281078. Epub 2011 Dec 7.

Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Mathematics and Sciences, University of Indonesia, Depok 16424, Indonesia.

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is recognized as a serious global health problem that is characterized by high blood sugar levels. Type 2 DM is more common in diabetic populations. In this type of DM, inhibition of α-glucosidase is a useful treatment to delay the absorption of glucose after meals. As a megabiodiversity country, Indonesia still has a lot of potential unexploited forests to be developed as a medicine source, including as the α-glucosidase inhibitor. In this study, we determine the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of 80% ethanol extracts of leaves and twigs of some plants from the Apocynaceae, Clusiaceae, Euphorbiaceae, and Rubiaceae. Inhibitory activity test of the α-glucosidase was performed in vitro using spectrophotometric methods. Compared with the control acarbose (IC(50) 117.20 μg/mL), thirty-seven samples of forty-five were shown to be more potent α-glucosidase inhibitors with IC(50) values in the range 2.33-112.02 μg/mL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/281078DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3236488PMC
May 2012

A new cytotoxic xanthone from Garcinia rigida.

Fitoterapia 2008 Apr 9;79(3):182-4. Epub 2008 Feb 9.

Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650204, Yunnan, China.

A new xanthone, yahyaxanthone (1), was isolated from Garcinia rigida leaves. Cytotoxicity evaluation showed that 1 was inhibitory to L1210 cell, with an IC50 value 4.08 microg/ml.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fitote.2007.11.022DOI Listing
April 2008

A new benzophenone from the stem bark of Garcinia benthami.

Nat Prod Res 2006 Oct;20(12):1059-62

Department of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok 16424, Indonesia.

From the stem bark of Garcinia benthami a new benzophenone, named Salimbenzophenone, was isolated. The structure was determined by means of spectroscopic analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786410500462512DOI Listing
October 2006

Two new xanthons from Garcinia rigida leaves.

Nat Prod Res 2006 Jul;20(9):788-91

Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650204, Yunnan, China.

Two new xanthons, musaxanthone (1) and asmaxanthone (2) were isolated from the leaves of Garciniarigida. The structures were determined by means of spectroscopic analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786410500049434DOI Listing
July 2006
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