Publications by authors named "Bensen Fan"

7 Publications

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Variability in the Duration of Designated Pediatric Orthopaedic Rotations Among US Residency Programs.

J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev 2021 01 19;5(1). Epub 2021 Jan 19.

From the Atlantic Medical Group, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Morristown, New Jersey (Dr. Fan); Rutgers- New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey (Dr. Zhao); and Department of Orthopedics, University of California, San Francisco, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital of Oakland, Oakland, California (Dr. Sabharwal).

Objective: Our goal was to assess the variability in the assigned duration of pediatric orthopaedic rotation among US allopathic orthopaedic residency programs to see how pediatrics is incorporated into surgical education.

Methods: Using publicly available information for US allopathic orthopaedic residency programs in 2019, we retrospectively collected data on the assigned duration of pediatric orthopaedic rotation and variables such as number and sex of residents, number of orthopaedic faculty, university- versus community-based programs, outsourcing residents to unaffiliated hospital for pediatric exposure, specialty of program leadership, and presence of pediatric orthopaedic fellowship in the home program.

Results: One hundred thirty-eight of the 146 (95%) eligible allopathic orthopaedic residency programs provided sufficient information. The average time assigned to a pediatric rotation during residency was 6 months (range: 2 to 11 months). Overall, 43/146 (29%) programs outsourced their pediatric training to another institution. A correlation was noted between the length of pediatric rotation and percentage of pediatric orthopaedic faculty (P = 0.0007, r = 0.3).

Conclusions: The impact of the variability in the duration of duration of pediatric orthopaedic rotation on the clinical knowledge and skills acquired by the resident during training needs further study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5435/JAAOSGlobal-D-20-00160DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7819687PMC
January 2021

Variability in Exposure to Subspecialty Rotations During Orthopaedic Residency: A Website-based Review of Orthopaedic Residency Programs.

J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev 2019 Jun 5;3(6):e010. Epub 2019 Jun 5.

Rutgers University New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (Dr. Chan, Dr. Fan, Dr. Zhao); Department of Clinical Orthopedics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (Dr. Sabharwal); and Benioff Children's Hospital of Oakland, Oakland, CA (Dr. Sabharwal).

Introduction: The variability in exposure to various subspecialty rotations during orthopaedic residency across the United States has not been well studied.

Methods: Data regarding program size, resident's sex, department leadership, university-based status of the program, outsourcing of subspecialty rotation, and geographic location were collected from websites of 151 US allopathic orthopaedic residency programs. The relationship of these factors with the time allotted for various clinical rotations was analyzed.

Results: The number of residents in a program correlated positively with time allocated for elective rotations (r = 0.57, = 0.0003). Residents in programs where the program director was a general orthopaedic surgeon spent more time on general orthopaedic rotations (22 versus 9.9 months, = 0.001). Programs where the program director or chairman was an orthopaedic oncologist spent more time on oncology rotations ([3.8 versus 3 months, = 0.01] and [3.5 versus 2.7 months, = 0.01], respectively). Residents in community programs spent more time on adult reconstruction than university-based programs (6.6 versus 5.5 months, = 0.014). Based on multiple linear regression analysis, time allotted for adult reconstruction (t = 2.29, = 0.02) and elective rotations (t = 2.43, = 0.017) was positively associated with the number of residents in the program.

Conclusions: Substantial variability exists in the time allocated to various clinical rotations during orthopaedic residency. The effect of this variability on clinical competence, trainees' career choices, and quality of patient care needs further study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5435/JAAOSGlobal-D-19-00010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6738553PMC
June 2019

Shearing Osteochondral Fracture of the Humeral Head: A Case Report.

JBJS Case Connect 2019 Apr-Jun;9(2):e0094

New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, New Jersey Orthopaedic Institute, Newark, New Jersey.

Case: A 30-year-old man was found to have a posteriorly displaced osteochondral shear fracture of his left humeral head, likely from dislocation and relocation. The fragment was fixed in its native position using headless screws, and the patient regained full strength and range of motion within 9 months.

Conclusions: Osteochondral shear fractures of the humeral head appear to shear off the anteromedial articular joint surface after dislocation and relocation. One should be suspicious for associated labral tears. Arthroplasty is a valid treatment option, but select patients may be eligible for other viable options.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.CC.18.00094DOI Listing
June 2020

Risk factors for failure of temporary hemiepiphysiodesis in Blount disease: a systematic review.

J Pediatr Orthop B 2020 Jan;29(1):65-72

Department of Orthopedics, University of California San Francisco, Benioff Children's Hospital of Oakland, Oakland, California, USA.

There is limited information regarding the use of temporary hemiepiphysiodesis for Blount disease. We performed a systematic review of patients treated for Blount disease using either extraperiosteal staples or plates to identify characteristics affecting clinical outcome, including the need for unplanned procedures. A total of 53 patients (63 bone segments) underwent temporary hemiepiphysiodesis at a mean age of 8.8 years (1.8-14.7 years). Overall, 32/63 (51%) segments achieved neutral mechanical axis and 31/63 (49%) underwent unplanned subsequent procedures, with or without a subsequent osteotomy. On the basis of the available heterogeneous data, neither age at index surgery nor the type of implant correlated with the need for unplanned additional surgeries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BPB.0000000000000603DOI Listing
January 2020

Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation Requires Central Spindle Proteins in Drosophila Oocytes.

Genetics 2016 Jan 12;202(1):61-75. Epub 2015 Nov 12.

Waksman Institute, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Jersey 08854 Department of Genetics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Jersey 08854

Oocytes segregate chromosomes in the absence of centrosomes. In this situation, the chromosomes direct spindle assembly. It is still unclear in this system which factors are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation and spindle assembly. The Drosophila kinesin-6 protein Subito, although nonessential for mitotic spindle assembly, is required to organize a bipolar meiotic spindle and chromosome bi-orientation in oocytes. Along with the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), Subito is an important part of the metaphase I central spindle. In this study we have conducted genetic screens to identify genes that interact with subito or the CPC component Incenp. In addition, the meiotic mutant phenotype for some of the genes identified in these screens were characterized. We show, in part through the use of a heat-shock-inducible system, that the Centralspindlin component RacGAP50C and downstream regulators of cytokinesis Rho1, Sticky, and RhoGEF2 are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation in metaphase I oocytes. This suggests a novel function for proteins normally involved in mitotic cell division in the regulation of microtubule-chromosome interactions. We also show that the kinetochore protein, Polo kinase, is required for maintaining chromosome alignment and spindle organization in metaphase I oocytes. In combination our results support a model where the meiotic central spindle and associated proteins are essential for acentrosomal chromosome segregation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1534/genetics.115.181081DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4701103PMC
January 2016

International elective during orthopaedic residency in North America: perceived barriers and opportunities.

J Bone Joint Surg Am 2015 Jan;97(1):e1

Department of Orthopedics, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, 90 Bergen Street, DOC 7300, Newark, NJ 07103. E-mail address for S. Sabharwal:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.N.00012DOI Listing
January 2015

Predictors of career choice in academic medicine among orthopaedic surgery residents.

J Bone Joint Surg Am 2014 Jan;96(1):e6

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, 90 Bergen Street, DOC 7300, Newark, NJ 07103. E-mail address for B. Fan: E-mail address for W. Berberian:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.L.01430DOI Listing
January 2014
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