Publications by authors named "Benjamin Vinet"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Interdevice agreement in respiratory resistance values by oscillometry in asthmatic children.

ERJ Open Res 2019 Feb 18;5(1). Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Clinical Research on Childhood Asthma Research Unit, Research Centre, Sainte-Justine University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Background: With several commercially available devices measuring respiratory impedance by oscillometry, the agreement between values obtained on different instruments or frequencies remains unclear. Our aim was to examine the agreement between resistance and reactance parameters on two oscillometry instruments using different waveforms.

Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study in asthmatic children aged 3-17 years. Reproducible oscillometry measurements were obtained in random order, by blinded operators, at three modes: 5-10-15-20-25 Hz (5-25 Hz) multifrequency mode on the MasterScreen impulse oscillometry system, and both 5-25 Hz multifrequency mode and 7 Hz monofrequency on the tremoFlo C-100 airwave sinusoidal system. Resistance, reactance and within-breath parameters were examined using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), paired t-test, linear regression and Bland-Altman method.

Results: Of 50 participants, 44 and 38 completed between-device and within-frequency measurements, respectively. Between-device measurements at 5-25 Hz showed high (ICC 0.88-0.91) and good (ICC 0.69-0.87) agreement in resistance and reactance, respectively, but with an absolute within-patient difference (≥0.05 kPa·L·s) and proportional bias (≥30% per kPa·L·s) in all parameters and oscillatory frequencies, apart from resistance at 5 Hz A significant proportional bias was documented in most within-breath parameters at 5 7 Hz on tremoFlo.

Conclusion: Observed differences in resistance and reactance suggest the need for instrument- and frequency-specific paediatric normative values.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/23120541.00138-2018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6421362PMC
February 2019

Impact of two oral doses of 100,000 IU of vitamin D in preschoolers with viral-induced asthma: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

Trials 2019 Feb 18;20(1):138. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Clinical Research and Knowledge Transfer Unit on Childhood Asthma, Research Centre, Sainte-Justine University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Background: New evidence supports the use of supplemental vitamin D in the prevention of exacerbation of asthma; however, the optimal posology to sufficiently raise serum levels while maximising adherence is unclear. The objective was to ascertain the efficacy of high-dose vitamin D in increasing serum vitamin D in preschoolers with asthma and provide preliminary data on safety and efficacy outcomes.

Methods: We conducted a 7-month, triple-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, pilot trial of children aged 1-5 years with viral-induced asthma. Participants were allocated to receive two oral doses of 100,000 IU vitamin D (intervention) or identical placebo (control) 3.5 months apart, once in the fall and once in the winter. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) was measured by tandem mass spectrometry at baseline, 10 days, 3.5 months, 3.5 months + 10 days, and 7 months. The main outcome was the change in serum 25OHD from baseline (Δ25OHD) over time and at 3.5 and 7 months; other outcomes included the proportion of children with 25OHD ≥ 75 nmol/L, safety, and adverse event rates.

Results: Children (N = 47) were randomised (intervention, 23; control, 24) in the fall. There was a significant adjusted group difference in the Δ25OHD (95% confidence interval) of 57.8 (47.3, 68.4) nmol/L, p < 0.0001), with a time (p < 0.0001) and group*time interaction effect (p < 0.0001), in favour of the intervention. A significant group difference in the Δ25OHD was observed 10 days after the first (119.3 [105.8, 132.9] nmol/L) and second (100.1 [85.7, 114.6] nmol/L) bolus; it did not reach statistical significance at 3.5 and 7 months. At 3.5 and 7 months, respectively, 63% and 56% of the intervention group were vitamin D sufficient (≥ 75 nmol/L) compared to 39% and 36% of the control group. Hypercalciuria, all without hypercalcaemia, was observed in 8.7% of intervention and 10.3% of control samples at any time point. Exacerbations requiring rescue oral corticosteroids, which appear as a promising primary outcome, occurred at a rate of 0.87/child.

Conclusion: Two oral boluses of 100,000 IU vitamin Donce in the fall and once in the winter, rapidly, safely, and significantly raises overall serum vitamin D metabolites. However, it is sufficient to maintain 25OHD ≥ 75 nmol/L throughout 7 months in only slightly more than half of participants.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02197702 (23 072014). Registered on 23 July 2014.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13063-019-3184-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6379931PMC
February 2019

Neuropsychiatric adverse drug reactions in children initiated on montelukast in real-life practice.

Eur Respir J 2017 08 17;50(2). Epub 2017 Aug 17.

Clinical Research and Knowledge Transfer Unit on Childhood Asthma, Research Centre, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, QC, Canada

Although montelukast is generally well tolerated, postmarketing studies have reported serious neuropsychiatric adverse drug reactions (ADRs) leading to a United States Food and Drug Administration black box warning. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of neuropsychiatric ADRs leading to discontinuation of montelukast in asthmatic children.We conducted a retrospective cohort study in children aged 1-17 years initiated on montelukast. In a nested cohort study, children initiated on montelukast as monotherapy or adjunct therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) were matched to those initiated on ICS monotherapy. A non-leading parental interview served to ascertain the occurrence of any ADRs with any asthma medication, and circumstances related to, and evolution of, the event.Out of the 106 participants who initiated montelukast, most were male (58%), Caucasian (62%) with a median (interquartile range) age of 5 (3-8) years. The incidence (95% CI) of drug cessation due to neuropsychiatric ADRs was 16 (10-26)%, mostly occurring within 2 weeks. Most frequent ADRs were irritability, aggressiveness and sleep disturbances. The relative risk of neuropsychiatric ADRs associated with montelukast ICS was 12 (2-90).In the real-life setting, asthmatic children initiated on montelukast experienced a notable risk of neuropsychiatric ADRs leading to drug cessation, that is significantly higher than that associated with ICS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/13993003.00148-2017DOI Listing
August 2017
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