Publications by authors named "Benjamin Lehne"

50 Publications

Genome Wide Association Study Identifies Two Novel Loci Associated with Female Stress and Urgency Urinary Incontinence.

J Urol 2021 Apr 27:101097JU0000000000001822. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Institute for Reproductive and Developmental Biology (IRDB), Imperial College London, UK.

Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified replicable genetic risk loci for stress or urgency urinary incontinence.

Methods: We carried out a discovery stage case control GWAS in three independent discovery cohorts of European women (n=8,979) for stress incontinence, urgency incontinence, and any incontinence phenotypes. We conducted replication in six additional studies of European ancestry (n=4,069). We collected bladder biopsies from women with incontinence to further investigate bladder expression of implicated genes and pathways (n=50) and used symptom questionnaires for phenotyping. We conducted meta-analyses using inverse variance fixed effects models in METAL, and whole transcriptome analyses using Affymetrix arrays, with replication with TaqMan PCR.

Results: In the discovery stage we identified 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped or imputed at five loci that reached genome-wide significance (p<5x10). In replication, rs138724718 on chromosome 2, near the macrophage receptor with collagenous structure () gene (replication p=0.003) associated with stress incontinence. In addition, rs34998271 on chromosome 6 near the Endothelin 1 () gene (replication p=0.0008) associated with urgency incontinence. In combined meta-analyses of discovery and replication cohorts, associations with genome-wide significance for these two SNPs were confirmed. Transcriptomics analyses showed differential expression of 7 of 19 genes in the endothelin pathway between stress and urgency incontinence (p<0.0001).

Conclusion: We uncovered two new risk loci near the genes Endothelin 1 (), associated with urgency incontinence and Macrophage Receptor with Collagenous Structure (), associated with stress incontinence. These loci are biologically plausible given their roles in smooth muscle contraction and innate host defense respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JU.0000000000001822DOI Listing
April 2021

Epigenetic Link Between Statin Therapy and Type 2 Diabetes.

Diabetes Care 2020 04 7;43(4):875-884. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, U.K.

Objective: To investigate the role of epigenetics in statins' diabetogenic effect comparing DNA methylation (DNAm) between statin users and nonusers in an epigenome-wide association study in blood.

Research Design And Methods: Five cohort studies' participants ( = 8,270) were classified as statin users when they were on statin therapy at the time of DNAm assessment with Illumina 450K or EPIC array or noncurrent users otherwise. Associations of DNAm with various outcomes like incident type 2 diabetes, plasma glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance (HOMA of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) as well as with gene expression were investigated.

Results: Discovery ( = 6,820) and replication ( = 1,450) phases associated five DNAm sites with statin use: cg17901584 (1.12 × 10 []), cg10177197 (3.94 × 10 []), cg06500161 (2.67 × 10 []), cg27243685 (6.01 × 10 []), and cg05119988 (7.26 × 10 []). Two sites were associated with at least one glycemic trait or type 2 diabetes. Higher cg06500161 methylation was associated with higher fasting glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, and type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 1.34 [95% CI 1.22, 1.47]). Mediation analyses suggested that methylation partially mediates the effect of statins on high insulin and HOMA-IR. Gene expression analyses showed that statin exposure and methylation were associated with downregulation, suggesting epigenetic regulation of expression. Further, outcomes insulin and HOMA-IR were significantly associated with expression.

Conclusions: This study sheds light on potential mechanisms linking statins with type 2 diabetes risk, providing evidence on DNAm partially mediating statins' effects on insulin traits. Further efforts shall disentangle the molecular mechanisms through which statins may induce DNAm changes, potentially leading to epigenetic regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc19-1828DOI Listing
April 2020

Alcohol consumption is associated with widespread changes in blood DNA methylation: Analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal data.

Addict Biol 2021 01 2;26(1):e12855. Epub 2019 Dec 2.

Cancer Epidemiology Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

DNA methylation may be one of the mechanisms by which alcohol consumption is associated with the risk of disease. We conducted a large-scale, cross-sectional, genome-wide DNA methylation association study of alcohol consumption and a longitudinal analysis of repeated measurements taken several years apart. Using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, DNA methylation was measured in blood samples from 5606 Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (MCCS) participants. For 1088 of them, these measures were repeated using blood samples collected a median of 11 years later. Associations between alcohol intake and blood DNA methylation were assessed using linear mixed-effects regression models. Independent data from the London Life Sciences Prospective Population (LOLIPOP) (N = 4042) and Cooperative Health Research in the Augsburg Region (KORA) (N = 1662) cohorts were used to replicate associations discovered in the MCCS. Cross-sectional analyses identified 1414 CpGs associated with alcohol intake at P < 10 , 1243 of which had not been reported previously. Of these novel associations, 1078 were replicated (P < .05) using LOLIPOP and KORA data. Using the MCCS data, we also replicated 403 of 518 previously reported associations. Interaction analyses suggested that associations were stronger for women, non-smokers, and participants genetically predisposed to consume less alcohol. Of the 1414 CpGs, 530 were differentially methylated (P < .05) in former compared with current drinkers. Longitudinal associations between the change in alcohol intake and the change in methylation were observed for 513 of the 1414 cross-sectional associations. Our study indicates that alcohol intake is associated with widespread changes in DNA methylation across the genome. Longitudinal analyses showed that the methylation status of alcohol-associated CpGs may change with alcohol consumption changes in adulthood.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12855DOI Listing
January 2021

Associations of autozygosity with a broad range of human phenotypes.

Nat Commun 2019 10 31;10(1):4957. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

Department of Neurology, Brain Centre Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 3584 CX, The Netherlands.

In many species, the offspring of related parents suffer reduced reproductive success, a phenomenon known as inbreeding depression. In humans, the importance of this effect has remained unclear, partly because reproduction between close relatives is both rare and frequently associated with confounding social factors. Here, using genomic inbreeding coefficients (F) for >1.4 million individuals, we show that F is significantly associated (p < 0.0005) with apparently deleterious changes in 32 out of 100 traits analysed. These changes are associated with runs of homozygosity (ROH), but not with common variant homozygosity, suggesting that genetic variants associated with inbreeding depression are predominantly rare. The effect on fertility is striking: F equivalent to the offspring of first cousins is associated with a 55% decrease [95% CI 44-66%] in the odds of having children. Finally, the effects of F are confirmed within full-sibling pairs, where the variation in F is independent of all environmental confounding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-12283-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6823371PMC
October 2019

Target genes, variants, tissues and transcriptional pathways influencing human serum urate levels.

Nat Genet 2019 10 2;51(10):1459-1474. Epub 2019 Oct 2.

Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Elevated serum urate levels cause gout and correlate with cardiometabolic diseases via poorly understood mechanisms. We performed a trans-ancestry genome-wide association study of serum urate in 457,690 individuals, identifying 183 loci (147 previously unknown) that improve the prediction of gout in an independent cohort of 334,880 individuals. Serum urate showed significant genetic correlations with many cardiometabolic traits, with genetic causality analyses supporting a substantial role for pleiotropy. Enrichment analysis, fine-mapping of urate-associated loci and colocalization with gene expression in 47 tissues implicated the kidney and liver as the main target organs and prioritized potentially causal genes and variants, including the transcriptional master regulators in the liver and kidney, HNF1A and HNF4A. Experimental validation showed that HNF4A transactivated the promoter of ABCG2, encoding a major urate transporter, in kidney cells, and that HNF4A p.Thr139Ile is a functional variant. Transcriptional coregulation within and across organs may be a general mechanism underlying the observed pleiotropy between urate and cardiometabolic traits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0504-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6858555PMC
October 2019

Epigenome-Wide Association Study of Incident Type 2 Diabetes in a British Population: EPIC-Norfolk Study.

Diabetes 2019 12 10;68(12):2315-2326. Epub 2019 Sep 10.

MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K.

Epigenetic changes may contribute substantially to risks of diseases of aging. Previous studies reported seven methylation variable positions (MVPs) robustly associated with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, their causal roles in T2DM are unclear. In an incident T2DM case-cohort study nested within the population-based European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk cohort, we used whole blood DNA collected at baseline, up to 11 years before T2DM onset, to investigate the role of methylation in the etiology of T2DM. We identified 15 novel MVPs with robust associations with incident T2DM and robustly confirmed three MVPs identified previously (near to , , and ). All 18 MVPs showed directionally consistent associations with incident and prevalent T2DM in independent studies. Further conditional analyses suggested that the identified epigenetic signals appear related to T2DM via glucose and obesity-related pathways acting before the collection of baseline samples. We integrated genome-wide genetic data to identify methylation-associated quantitative trait loci robustly associated with 16 of the 18 MVPs and found one MVP, cg00574958 at , with a possible direct causal role in T2DM. None of the implicated genes were previously highlighted by genetic association studies, suggesting that DNA methylation studies may reveal novel biological mechanisms involved in tissue responses to glycemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db18-0290DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6868468PMC
December 2019

A catalog of genetic loci associated with kidney function from analyses of a million individuals.

Nat Genet 2019 06 31;51(6):957-972. Epub 2019 May 31.

Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease-Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Clincial Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is responsible for a public health burden with multi-systemic complications. Through trans-ancestry meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and independent replication (n = 1,046,070), we identified 264 associated loci (166 new). Of these, 147 were likely to be relevant for kidney function on the basis of associations with the alternative kidney function marker blood urea nitrogen (n = 416,178). Pathway and enrichment analyses, including mouse models with renal phenotypes, support the kidney as the main target organ. A genetic risk score for lower eGFR was associated with clinically diagnosed CKD in 452,264 independent individuals. Colocalization analyses of associations with eGFR among 783,978 European-ancestry individuals and gene expression across 46 human tissues, including tubulo-interstitial and glomerular kidney compartments, identified 17 genes differentially expressed in kidney. Fine-mapping highlighted missense driver variants in 11 genes and kidney-specific regulatory variants. These results provide a comprehensive priority list of molecular targets for translational research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0407-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6698888PMC
June 2019

A multi-ancestry genome-wide study incorporating gene-smoking interactions identifies multiple new loci for pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure.

Hum Mol Genet 2019 08;28(15):2615-2633

Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.

Elevated blood pressure (BP), a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, is influenced by both genetic and lifestyle factors. Cigarette smoking is one such lifestyle factor. Across five ancestries, we performed a genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP) in 129 913 individuals in stage 1 and follow-up analysis in 480 178 additional individuals in stage 2. We report here 136 loci significantly associated with MAP and/or PP. Of these, 61 were previously published through main-effect analysis of BP traits, 37 were recently reported by us for systolic BP and/or diastolic BP through gene-smoking interaction analysis and 38 were newly identified (P < 5 × 10-8, false discovery rate < 0.05). We also identified nine new signals near known loci. Of the 136 loci, 8 showed significant interaction with smoking status. They include CSMD1 previously reported for insulin resistance and BP in the spontaneously hypertensive rats. Many of the 38 new loci show biologic plausibility for a role in BP regulation. SLC26A7 encodes a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger expressed in the renal outer medullary collecting duct. AVPR1A is widely expressed, including in vascular smooth muscle cells, kidney, myocardium and brain. FHAD1 is a long non-coding RNA overexpressed in heart failure. TMEM51 was associated with contractile function in cardiomyocytes. CASP9 plays a central role in cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Identified only in African ancestry were 30 novel loci. Our findings highlight the value of multi-ancestry investigations, particularly in studies of interaction with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences may contribute to novel findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddz070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6644157PMC
August 2019

Serum metabolic signatures of coronary and carotid atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular disease.

Eur Heart J 2019 09;40(34):2883-2896

Section on Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

Aims: To characterize serum metabolic signatures associated with atherosclerosis in the coronary or carotid arteries and subsequently their association with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Methods And Results: We used untargeted one-dimensional (1D) serum metabolic profiling by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) among 3867 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), with replication among 3569 participants from the Rotterdam and LOLIPOP studies. Atherosclerosis was assessed by coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). We used multivariable linear regression to evaluate associations between NMR features and atherosclerosis accounting for multiplicity of comparisons. We then examined associations between metabolites associated with atherosclerosis and incident CVD available in MESA and Rotterdam and explored molecular networks through bioinformatics analyses. Overall, 30 1H NMR measured metabolites were associated with CAC and/or IMT, P = 1.3 × 10-14 to 1.0 × 10-6 (discovery) and P = 5.6 × 10-10 to 1.1 × 10-2 (replication). These associations were substantially attenuated after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Metabolites associated with atherosclerosis revealed disturbances in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, branched chain, and aromatic amino acid metabolism, as well as oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways. Analyses of incident CVD events showed inverse associations with creatine, creatinine, and phenylalanine, and direct associations with mannose, acetaminophen-glucuronide, and lactate as well as apolipoprotein B (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Metabolites associated with atherosclerosis were largely consistent between the two vascular beds (coronary and carotid arteries) and predominantly tag pathways that overlap with the known cardiovascular risk factors. We present an integrated systems network that highlights a series of inter-connected pathways underlying atherosclerosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehz235DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7963131PMC
September 2019

Multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of 387,272 individuals identifies new loci associated with serum lipids.

Nat Genet 2019 04 29;51(4):636-648. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.

The concentrations of high- and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are influenced by smoking, but it is unknown whether genetic associations with lipids may be modified by smoking. We conducted a multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study in 133,805 individuals with follow-up in an additional 253,467 individuals. Combined meta-analyses identified 13 new loci associated with lipids, some of which were detected only because association differed by smoking status. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of including diverse populations, particularly in studies of interactions with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences by ancestry may contribute to novel findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0378-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6467258PMC
April 2019

Multiancestry Genome-Wide Association Study of Lipid Levels Incorporating Gene-Alcohol Interactions.

Am J Epidemiol 2019 06;188(6):1033-1054

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

A person's lipid profile is influenced by genetic variants and alcohol consumption, but the contribution of interactions between these exposures has not been studied. We therefore incorporated gene-alcohol interactions into a multiancestry genome-wide association study of levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. We included 45 studies in stage 1 (genome-wide discovery) and 66 studies in stage 2 (focused follow-up), for a total of 394,584 individuals from 5 ancestry groups. Analyses covered the period July 2014-November 2017. Genetic main effects and interaction effects were jointly assessed by means of a 2-degrees-of-freedom (df) test, and a 1-df test was used to assess the interaction effects alone. Variants at 495 loci were at least suggestively associated (P < 1 × 10-6) with lipid levels in stage 1 and were evaluated in stage 2, followed by combined analyses of stage 1 and stage 2. In the combined analysis of stages 1 and 2, a total of 147 independent loci were associated with lipid levels at P < 5 × 10-8 using 2-df tests, of which 18 were novel. No genome-wide-significant associations were found testing the interaction effect alone. The novel loci included several genes (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 5 (PCSK5), vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGFB), and apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 1 (APOBEC1) complementation factor (A1CF)) that have a putative role in lipid metabolism on the basis of existing evidence from cellular and experimental models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwz005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6545280PMC
June 2019

Association of maternal prenatal smoking GFI1-locus and cardio-metabolic phenotypes in 18,212 adults.

EBioMedicine 2018 Dec 13;38:206-216. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Department of Neurology, Brain Centre Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: DNA methylation at the GFI1-locus has been repeatedly associated with exposure to smoking from the foetal period onwards. We explored whether DNA methylation may be a mechanism that links exposure to maternal prenatal smoking with offspring's adult cardio-metabolic health.

Methods: We meta-analysed the association between DNA methylation at GFI1-locus with maternal prenatal smoking, adult own smoking, and cardio-metabolic phenotypes in 22 population-based studies from Europe, Australia, and USA (n = 18,212). DNA methylation at the GFI1-locus was measured in whole-blood. Multivariable regression models were fitted to examine its association with exposure to prenatal and own adult smoking. DNA methylation levels were analysed in relation to body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), fasting glucose (FG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), diastolic, and systolic blood pressure (BP).

Findings: Lower DNA methylation at three out of eight GFI1-CpGs was associated with exposure to maternal prenatal smoking, whereas, all eight CpGs were associated with adult own smoking. Lower DNA methylation at cg14179389, the strongest maternal prenatal smoking locus, was associated with increased WC and BP when adjusted for sex, age, and adult smoking with Bonferroni-corrected P < 0·012. In contrast, lower DNA methylation at cg09935388, the strongest adult own smoking locus, was associated with decreased BMI, WC, and BP (adjusted 1 × 10 < P < 0.01). Similarly, lower DNA methylation at cg12876356, cg18316974, cg09662411, and cg18146737 was associated with decreased BMI and WC (5 × 10 < P < 0.001). Lower DNA methylation at all the CpGs was consistently associated with higher TG levels.

Interpretation: Epigenetic changes at the GFI1 were linked to smoking exposure in-utero/in-adulthood and robustly associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors. FUND: European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no. 633595 DynaHEALTH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2018.10.066DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306313PMC
December 2018

Genome Analyses of >200,000 Individuals Identify 58 Loci for Chronic Inflammation and Highlight Pathways that Link Inflammation and Complex Disorders.

Am J Hum Genet 2018 11;103(5):691-706

Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a sensitive biomarker of chronic low-grade inflammation and is associated with multiple complex diseases. The genetic determinants of chronic inflammation remain largely unknown, and the causal role of CRP in several clinical outcomes is debated. We performed two genome-wide association studies (GWASs), on HapMap and 1000 Genomes imputed data, of circulating amounts of CRP by using data from 88 studies comprising 204,402 European individuals. Additionally, we performed in silico functional analyses and Mendelian randomization analyses with several clinical outcomes. The GWAS meta-analyses of CRP revealed 58 distinct genetic loci (p < 5 × 10). After adjustment for body mass index in the regression analysis, the associations at all except three loci remained. The lead variants at the distinct loci explained up to 7.0% of the variance in circulating amounts of CRP. We identified 66 gene sets that were organized in two substantially correlated clusters, one mainly composed of immune pathways and the other characterized by metabolic pathways in the liver. Mendelian randomization analyses revealed a causal protective effect of CRP on schizophrenia and a risk-increasing effect on bipolar disorder. Our findings provide further insights into the biology of inflammation and could lead to interventions for treating inflammation and its clinical consequences.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.09.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6218410PMC
November 2018

Genetic analysis of over 1 million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits.

Nat Genet 2018 10 17;50(10):1412-1425. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Laboratory of Genetics and Genomics, NIA/NIH, Baltimore, MD, USA.

High blood pressure is a highly heritable and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We report the largest genetic association study of blood pressure traits (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) to date in over 1 million people of European ancestry. We identify 535 novel blood pressure loci that not only offer new biological insights into blood pressure regulation but also highlight shared genetic architecture between blood pressure and lifestyle exposures. Our findings identify new biological pathways for blood pressure regulation with potential for improved cardiovascular disease prevention in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0205-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6284793PMC
October 2018

Novel genetic associations for blood pressure identified via gene-alcohol interaction in up to 570K individuals across multiple ancestries.

PLoS One 2018 18;13(6):e0198166. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.

Heavy alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for hypertension; the mechanism by which alcohol consumption impact blood pressure (BP) regulation remains unknown. We hypothesized that a genome-wide association study accounting for gene-alcohol consumption interaction for BP might identify additional BP loci and contribute to the understanding of alcohol-related BP regulation. We conducted a large two-stage investigation incorporating joint testing of main genetic effects and single nucleotide variant (SNV)-alcohol consumption interactions. In Stage 1, genome-wide discovery meta-analyses in ≈131K individuals across several ancestry groups yielded 3,514 SNVs (245 loci) with suggestive evidence of association (P < 1.0 x 10-5). In Stage 2, these SNVs were tested for independent external replication in ≈440K individuals across multiple ancestries. We identified and replicated (at Bonferroni correction threshold) five novel BP loci (380 SNVs in 21 genes) and 49 previously reported BP loci (2,159 SNVs in 109 genes) in European ancestry, and in multi-ancestry meta-analyses (P < 5.0 x 10-8). For African ancestry samples, we detected 18 potentially novel BP loci (P < 5.0 x 10-8) in Stage 1 that warrant further replication. Additionally, correlated meta-analysis identified eight novel BP loci (11 genes). Several genes in these loci (e.g., PINX1, GATA4, BLK, FTO and GABBR2) have been previously reported to be associated with alcohol consumption. These findings provide insights into the role of alcohol consumption in the genetic architecture of hypertension.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0198166PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6005576PMC
January 2019

Refining the accuracy of validated target identification through coding variant fine-mapping in type 2 diabetes.

Nat Genet 2018 04 9;50(4):559-571. Epub 2018 Apr 9.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

We aggregated coding variant data for 81,412 type 2 diabetes cases and 370,832 controls of diverse ancestry, identifying 40 coding variant association signals (P < 2.2 × 10); of these, 16 map outside known risk-associated loci. We make two important observations. First, only five of these signals are driven by low-frequency variants: even for these, effect sizes are modest (odds ratio ≤1.29). Second, when we used large-scale genome-wide association data to fine-map the associated variants in their regional context, accounting for the global enrichment of complex trait associations in coding sequence, compelling evidence for coding variant causality was obtained for only 16 signals. At 13 others, the associated coding variants clearly represent 'false leads' with potential to generate erroneous mechanistic inference. Coding variant associations offer a direct route to biological insight for complex diseases and identification of validated therapeutic targets; however, appropriate mechanistic inference requires careful specification of their causal contribution to disease predisposition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0084-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5898373PMC
April 2018

A Large-Scale Multi-ancestry Genome-wide Study Accounting for Smoking Behavior Identifies Multiple Significant Loci for Blood Pressure.

Am J Hum Genet 2018 03 15;102(3):375-400. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Health Disparities Research Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.

Genome-wide association analysis advanced understanding of blood pressure (BP), a major risk factor for vascular conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke. Accounting for smoking behavior may help identify BP loci and extend our knowledge of its genetic architecture. We performed genome-wide association meta-analyses of systolic and diastolic BP incorporating gene-smoking interactions in 610,091 individuals. Stage 1 analysis examined ∼18.8 million SNPs and small insertion/deletion variants in 129,913 individuals from four ancestries (European, African, Asian, and Hispanic) with follow-up analysis of promising variants in 480,178 additional individuals from five ancestries. We identified 15 loci that were genome-wide significant (p < 5 × 10) in stage 1 and formally replicated in stage 2. A combined stage 1 and 2 meta-analysis identified 66 additional genome-wide significant loci (13, 35, and 18 loci in European, African, and trans-ancestry, respectively). A total of 56 known BP loci were also identified by our results (p < 5 × 10). Of the newly identified loci, ten showed significant interaction with smoking status, but none of them were replicated in stage 2. Several loci were identified in African ancestry, highlighting the importance of genetic studies in diverse populations. The identified loci show strong evidence for regulatory features and support shared pathophysiology with cardiometabolic and addiction traits. They also highlight a role in BP regulation for biological candidates such as modulators of vascular structure and function (CDKN1B, BCAR1-CFDP1, PXDN, EEA1), ciliopathies (SDCCAG8, RPGRIP1L), telomere maintenance (TNKS, PINX1, AKTIP), and central dopaminergic signaling (MSRA, EBF2).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.01.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5985266PMC
March 2018

Vaginal dysbiosis increases risk of preterm fetal membrane rupture, neonatal sepsis and is exacerbated by erythromycin.

BMC Med 2018 01 24;16(1). Epub 2018 Jan 24.

Imperial College Parturition Research Group, Division of the Institute of Reproductive and Developmental Biology, Imperial College London, London, W12 0NN, UK.

Background: Preterm prelabour rupture of the fetal membranes (PPROM) precedes 30% of preterm births and is a risk factor for early onset neonatal sepsis. As PPROM is strongly associated with ascending vaginal infection, prophylactic antibiotics are widely used. The evolution of vaginal microbiota compositions associated with PPROM and the impact of antibiotics on bacterial compositions are unknown.

Methods: We prospectively assessed vaginal microbiota prior to and following PPROM using MiSeq-based sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and examined the impact of erythromycin prophylaxis on bacterial load and community structures.

Results: In contrast to pregnancies delivering at term, vaginal dysbiosis characterised by Lactobacillus spp. depletion was present prior to the rupture of fetal membranes in approximately a third of cases (0% vs. 27%, P = 0.026) and persisted following membrane rupture (31%, P = 0.005). Vaginal dysbiosis was exacerbated by erythromycin treatment (47%, P = 0.00009) particularly in women initially colonised by Lactobacillus spp. Lactobacillus depletion and increased relative abundance of Sneathia spp. were associated with subsequent funisitis and early onset neonatal sepsis.

Conclusions: Our data show that vaginal microbiota composition is a risk factor for subsequent PPROM and is associated with adverse short-term maternal and neonatal outcomes. This highlights vaginal microbiota as a potentially modifiable antenatal risk factor for PPROM and suggests that routine use of erythromycin for PPROM be re-examined.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-017-0999-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5782380PMC
January 2018

Sequence data and association statistics from 12,940 type 2 diabetes cases and controls.

Sci Data 2017 12 19;4:170179. Epub 2017 Dec 19.

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

To investigate the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) to high resolution, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia catalogued variation from whole-genome sequencing of 2,657 European individuals and exome sequencing of 12,940 individuals of multiple ancestries. Over 27M SNPs, indels, and structural variants were identified, including 99% of low-frequency (minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.1-5%) non-coding variants in the whole-genome sequenced individuals and 99.7% of low-frequency coding variants in the whole-exome sequenced individuals. Each variant was tested for association with T2D in the sequenced individuals, and, to increase power, most were tested in larger numbers of individuals (>80% of low-frequency coding variants in ~82 K Europeans via the exome chip, and ~90% of low-frequency non-coding variants in ~44 K Europeans via genotype imputation). The variants, genotypes, and association statistics from these analyses provide the largest reference to date of human genetic information relevant to T2D, for use in activities such as T2D-focused genotype imputation, functional characterization of variants or genes, and other novel analyses to detect associations between sequence variation and T2D.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sdata.2017.179DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5735917PMC
December 2017

Impact of common genetic determinants of Hemoglobin A1c on type 2 diabetes risk and diagnosis in ancestrally diverse populations: A transethnic genome-wide meta-analysis.

PLoS Med 2017 Sep 12;14(9):e1002383. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.

Background: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is used to diagnose type 2 diabetes (T2D) and assess glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 HbA1c-associated genetic variants. These variants proved to be classifiable by their likely biological action as erythrocytic (also associated with erythrocyte traits) or glycemic (associated with other glucose-related traits). In this study, we tested the hypotheses that, in a very large scale GWAS, we would identify more genetic variants associated with HbA1c and that HbA1c variants implicated in erythrocytic biology would affect the diagnostic accuracy of HbA1c. We therefore expanded the number of HbA1c-associated loci and tested the effect of genetic risk-scores comprised of erythrocytic or glycemic variants on incident diabetes prediction and on prevalent diabetes screening performance. Throughout this multiancestry study, we kept a focus on interancestry differences in HbA1c genetics performance that might influence race-ancestry differences in health outcomes.

Methods & Findings: Using genome-wide association meta-analyses in up to 159,940 individuals from 82 cohorts of European, African, East Asian, and South Asian ancestry, we identified 60 common genetic variants associated with HbA1c. We classified variants as implicated in glycemic, erythrocytic, or unclassified biology and tested whether additive genetic scores of erythrocytic variants (GS-E) or glycemic variants (GS-G) were associated with higher T2D incidence in multiethnic longitudinal cohorts (N = 33,241). Nineteen glycemic and 22 erythrocytic variants were associated with HbA1c at genome-wide significance. GS-G was associated with higher T2D risk (incidence OR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.04-1.06, per HbA1c-raising allele, p = 3 × 10-29); whereas GS-E was not (OR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.99-1.01, p = 0.60). In Europeans and Asians, erythrocytic variants in aggregate had only modest effects on the diagnostic accuracy of HbA1c. Yet, in African Americans, the X-linked G6PD G202A variant (T-allele frequency 11%) was associated with an absolute decrease in HbA1c of 0.81%-units (95% CI 0.66-0.96) per allele in hemizygous men, and 0.68%-units (95% CI 0.38-0.97) in homozygous women. The G6PD variant may cause approximately 2% (N = 0.65 million, 95% CI 0.55-0.74) of African American adults with T2D to remain undiagnosed when screened with HbA1c. Limitations include the smaller sample sizes for non-European ancestries and the inability to classify approximately one-third of the variants. Further studies in large multiethnic cohorts with HbA1c, glycemic, and erythrocytic traits are required to better determine the biological action of the unclassified variants.

Conclusions: As G6PD deficiency can be clinically silent until illness strikes, we recommend investigation of the possible benefits of screening for the G6PD genotype along with using HbA1c to diagnose T2D in populations of African ancestry or groups where G6PD deficiency is common. Screening with direct glucose measurements, or genetically-informed HbA1c diagnostic thresholds in people with G6PD deficiency, may be required to avoid missed or delayed diagnoses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002383DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5595282PMC
September 2017

Improving Visualization and Interpretation of Metabolome-Wide Association Studies: An Application in a Population-Based Cohort Using Untargeted H NMR Metabolic Profiling.

J Proteome Res 2017 10 8;16(10):3623-3633. Epub 2017 Sep 8.

Bioincubator Unit, Metabometrix Ltd , Bessemer Building, Prince Consort Road, South Kensington, London SW7 2BP U.K.

H NMR spectroscopy of biofluids generates reproducible data allowing detection and quantification of small molecules in large population cohorts. Statistical models to analyze such data are now well-established, and the use of univariate metabolome wide association studies (MWAS) investigating the spectral features separately has emerged as a computationally efficient and interpretable alternative to multivariate models. The MWAS rely on the accurate estimation of a metabolome wide significance level (MWSL) to be applied to control the family wise error rate. Subsequent interpretation requires efficient visualization and formal feature annotation, which, in-turn, call for efficient prioritization of spectral variables of interest. Using human serum H NMR spectroscopic profiles from 3948 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), we have performed a series of MWAS for serum levels of glucose. We first propose an extension of the conventional MWSL that yields stable estimates of the MWSL across the different model parameterizations and distributional features of the outcome. We propose both efficient visualization methods and a strategy based on subsampling and internal validation to prioritize the associations. Our work proposes and illustrates practical and scalable solutions to facilitate the implementation of the MWAS approach and improve interpretation in large cohort studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jproteome.7b00344DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5633829PMC
October 2017

Novel Blood Pressure Locus and Gene Discovery Using Genome-Wide Association Study and Expression Data Sets From Blood and the Kidney.

Hypertension 2017 Jul 24. Epub 2017 Jul 24.

From the Department of Health Sciences (L.V.W., A.M.E., N. Shrine, C.B., T.B., M.D.T.), and Department of Cardiovascular Sciences and NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre (C.P.N., P.S.B., N.J.S.), University of Leicester, United Kingdom; Department of Epidemiology (A.V., P.J.v.d.M., I.M.N., H. Snieder), Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine (M.H.d.B., M.A.S.), Interdisciplinary Center Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation (IPCE) (A.J.O., H.R., C.A.H.), Department of Genetics, (M.S.), and Department of Cardiology (P.v.d.H.), University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands; Research Institute for Primordial Prevention of Non-Communicable Disease, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran (A.V.); Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, The Netherlands (R. Jansen); Hebrew SeniorLife, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (R. Joehanes); National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study, MA (R. Joehanes, A.D.J., M. Larson); Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (P.F.O.), and Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology (M.M., C. Menni, T.D.S.), King's College London, United Kingdom; Clinical Pharmacology, William Harvey Research Institute (C.P.C., H.R.W., M.R.B., M. Brown, B.M., M.R., P.B.M., M.J.C.) and NIHR Barts Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit (C.P.C., H.R.W., M.R.B., M. Brown, P.B.M., M.J.C.), Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom; Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (L.M.R., F.G., P.M.R., D.I.C.); Department of Epidemiology (G.C.V., A. Hofman, A.G.U., O.H.F.), Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology (N.A., B.A.O., C.M.v.D.), and Department of Internal Medicine (A.G.U.), Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Biological Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, EMGO+ Institute, VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands (J.-J.H., E.J.d.G., G.W., D.I.B.); Cardiovascular Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden (R.J.S., M. Frånberg, A. Hamsten); Centre for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Universitetsjukhuset, Solna, Sweden (R.J.S., M. Frånberg, A. Hamsten); Estonian Genome Center (T.E., E.O., A. Metspalu), Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine (S.S., M. Laan), and Estonian Genome Center (M.P.), University of Tartu, Estonia; Divisions of Endocrinology/Children's Hospital, Boston, MA (T.E.); Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA (T.E., C.M.L., C.N.-C.); Center for Complex Disease Genomics, McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (D.E.A., P.N., A. Chakravarti, G.B.E.); The Population Science Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (S.-J.H., D.L.), Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging (M.A.N.), Medical Genomics and Metabolic Genetics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute (F.C.), and Center for Information Technology (Y.D., P.J.M., Q.T.N.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; The Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA (S.-J.H., D.L.); The Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Department of Pediatrics (X.G., J.Y.), and The Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine (J.I.R.), LABioMed at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA; Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland (Z.K., M. Bochud); Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland (Z.K.); Department of Cardiology (S. Trompet, J.W.J.) Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics (S. Trompet), Department of Clinical Epidemiology (R.L.-G., R.d.M., D.O.M.-K.), Department of Molecular Epidemiology (J.D.), and Department of Public Health and Primary Care (D.O.M.-K.), Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands; Institute for Community Medicine (A.T.), Department of Internal Medicine B (M.D.), and Interfaculty Institute for Genetics and Functional Genomics (U.V.), University Medicine Greifswald, Germany; DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Greifswald, Germany (A.T., M.D., U.V.); Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany (J.S.R., A. Peters); Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine (J.C.B., B.M.P.) and Departments of Biostatistics (K.R.), Epidemiology (B.M.P.), and Health Services (B.M.P.), University of Washington, Seattle; Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland (A.V.S., V. Gudnason); Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland (A.V.S., V. Gudnason); Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories, Tampere, Finland (L.-P.L., T.L.); Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland (L.-P.L., T.L.); Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics (A. Mahajan, A.G., M. Farrall, T.F., C.M.L., H.W., A.P.M.), and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine (A.G., M. Farrall, H.W.), University of Oxford, United Kingdom; MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Metabolic Science, United Kingdom (N.J.W., J.L., C.L., R.J.F.L., R.A.S., J.H.Z.); Clinical Division of Neurogeriatrics, Department of Neurology (E.H., R. Schmidt), Institute of Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation (E.H.), and Department of Neurology (H. Schmidt), Medical University Graz, Austria; Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics (P.K.J., H.C., I.R., S.W., J.F.W.), Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology (L.M.L., S.E.H., G.D., A.J.G., D.C.M.L., J.M.S., I.J.D.), Medical Genetics Section, Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (A. Campbell), Generation Scotland, Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine (A. Campbell, S.P., C.H.), Department of Psychology (G.D., D.C.M.L., A. Pattie, I.J.D.), Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre (J.M.S.), and Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (C.H.), University of Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Health (K.K., A.S.H., T. Niiranen, P.J., A.J., S. Koskinen, P.K., V.S., M.P.), and Chronic Disease Prevention Unit (J.T.), National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland; Division of Genetics and Cell Biology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy (M.T., C.M.B., C.F.S., D.T.); Data Tecnica International, Glen Echo, MD (M.A.N.); Medical Genetics, IRCCS-Burlo Garofolo Children Hospital, Trieste, Italy (D.V., G.G., P.G.); Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Italy (D.V., I.G., M. Brumat, M. Cocca, A. Morgan, G.G., P.G.); Institute for Biomedicine, Eurac Research, Affiliated Institute of the University of Lübeck, Bolzano, Italy (F.D.G.M., P.P.P., A.S.P., A.A.H.); Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences (K.L.A.), The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine (Y.L., E.P.B., R.J.F.L.), and Mindich Child health Development Institute (R.J.F.L.), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York; Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics, IMIM, and CIBERCV, Barcelona, Spain (J. Marrugat, R.E.); Institute of Genetics and Biophysics A. Buzzati-Traverso, CNR, Napoli, Italy (D.R., T. Nutile, R. Sorice, M. Ciullo); Department of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin (L.M.L.); UCD Conway Institute, Centre for Proteome Research (L.M.L.), and School of Medicine, Conway Institute (D.C.S.), University College Dublin, Belfield, Ireland; Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala Universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, Sweden (S.E., Å. Johansson, U.G.); Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (A.U.J., M. Boehnke); NIHR Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester United Kingdom (C.P.N., P.S.B., N.J.S.); MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (J.E.H., V.V., J. Marten, A.F.W., J.F.W.), and Medical Genetics Section, Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine and MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (S.E.H.), University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health (W.Z., E.E., J.C.C., H.G., B.L., I.T., A.-C.V.), MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health (M.-R.J., P.E.), School of Public Health (N.P.), International Centre for Circulatory Health (S. Thom), and National Heart and Lung Institute (P.S.), Imperial College London, United Kingdom; Department of Cardiology, Ealing Hospital, London North West Healthcare NHS Trust, Southall, United Kingdom (W.Z., J.C.C., J.S.K.); Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Split, Croatia (T.Z.); Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina Medical School, Greece (E.E.); Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Scotland, United Kingdom (N. Shah, A.S.F.D., C.N.A.P.); Department of Pharmacy, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad, Pakistan (N. Shah); National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, London, United Kingdom (M.M.); Department of Human Genetics, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, United Kingdom (B.P.P., E.Z.); INSERM U 1219, Bordeaux Population Health Center, France (G.C., C.T., S.D.); Bordeaux University, France (G.C., C.T., S.D.); Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton, NSW, Australia (C.O., E.G.H., R. Scott, J.A.); Center for Statistical Genetics, Department of Biostatistics, Ann Arbor, MI (G.A.); Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran (M.A.); Busselton Population Medical Research Institute, Western Australia (J.B., J.H.); PathWest Laboratory Medicine of Western Australia, Nedlands (J.B., J.H.); School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (J.B., J.H.), School of Population and Global Health (J.H.), and School of Medicine and Pharmacology (A. James), The University of Western Australia, Nedlands; Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom (J.C.C., J.S.K.); University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, United Kingdom (J.C.); Institute of Genetic Medicine (H.J.C.), and Institute of Health and Society (C. Mamasoula), Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom; Department of Pathology, Amsterdam Medical Center, The Netherlands (J.J.D.); Department of Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, Stockholm University, Sweden (M. Frånberg); Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics, Uppsala, Sweden (V. Giedraitis); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt (GmbH), Neuherberg, Germany (C.G.); Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom (A.J.G.); Intramural Research Program, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry, National Institute on Aging (T.B.H., L.J.L.); Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (A. Hofman); Center For Life-Course Health Research (M.-R.J.), and Biocenter Oulu (M.-R.J.), University of Oulu, Finland; Unit of Primary Care, Oulu University Hospital, Finland (M.-R.J.); National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Human Genomics Branch, Bethesda, MD (A.D.J.); Department of Clinical Physiology, Tampere University Hospital, Finland (M.K.); Department of Clinical Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland (M.K.); Cardiovascular Research Center (S. Kathiresan, C.N.-C.); Center for Human Genetics (S. Kathiresan), and Center for Human Genetic Research (C.N.-C.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA (S. Kathiresan, C.N.-C.); Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom (K.-T.K.); Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Split, Croatia (I.K., O.P.); Cardiology, Department of Specialties of Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Switzerland (L. Lin, F.M., G.B.E.); Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology (L. Lind, J.S.), and Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (E.I.), Uppsala University, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (Y.M., B.W.J.H.P.); School of Molecular, Genetic and Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Medical School, Teviot Place, Scotland, United Kingdom (A.D.M.); Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (A.C.M.); British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences (S.P.), and Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine (D.J.S.), University of Glasgow, United Kingdom; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Finland (A. Palotie, S.R., A.-P.S., M.P.); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada (G.P., S. Thériault); Department of Neurology, General Central Hospital, Bolzano, Italy (P.P.P.); Department of Neurology, University of Lübeck, Germany (P.P.P.); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Finland (O.T.R.); Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Finland (O.T.R.); Department of Cardiology, Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China (M.R.); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (P.M.R., D.I.C.); Institute for Maternal and Child Health IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Trieste, Italy (A.R.); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Centre for Molecular Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Austria (Y.S., H. Schmidt); INSERM U1078, Etablissement Français du Sang, Brest Cedex, France (A.S.P.); Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia (R. Scott, J.A.); John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton, NSW, Australia (R. Scott, J.A.); The New York Academy of Medicine, New York (D.S.); IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Isernia, Italy (R. Sorice, M. Ciullo); Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland (A.S.); Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Los Angeles BioMedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (K.D.T.); Division of Genetic Outcomes, Department of Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (K.D.T.); Department of Public Health (C.T.), and Department of Neurology (S.D.), Bordeaux University Hospital, France; Department of Internal Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, CHUV, Switzerland (P.V.); Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton Ontario, Canada (D.C.); National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, United Kingdom (J.S.K.); Dasman Diabetes Institute, Kuwait (J.T.); Diabetes Research Group, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (J.T.); Department of Neurosciences and Preventive Medicine, Danube-University Krems, Austria (J.T.); Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, The University of Manchester and Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom (B.D.K.); Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem (Y.M.L.); Kaiser Permanent Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA (B.M.P.); Institute of Physiology, University Medicine Greifswald, Karlsburg, Germany (R.R); Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (A. James); Population Health Research Institute, St George's, University of London, United Kingdom (D.P.S.); Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (W.P.); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA (E.I.); Data Science Institute and Lancaster Medical School, Lancaster University, United Kingdom (J.K.); and Department of Biostatistics, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom (A.P.M.).

Elevated blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has a substantial genetic contribution. Genetic variation influencing blood pressure has the potential to identify new pharmacological targets for the treatment of hypertension. To discover additional novel blood pressure loci, we used 1000 Genomes Project-based imputation in 150 134 European ancestry individuals and sought significant evidence for independent replication in a further 228 245 individuals. We report 6 new signals of association in or near , , , , , and , and provide new replication evidence for a further 2 signals in and Combining large whole-blood gene expression resources totaling 12 607 individuals, we investigated all novel and previously reported signals and identified 48 genes with evidence for involvement in blood pressure regulation that are significant in multiple resources. Three novel kidney-specific signals were also detected. These robustly implicated genes may provide new leads for therapeutic innovation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5783787PMC
July 2017

Whole-Genome Sequencing Coupled to Imputation Discovers Genetic Signals for Anthropometric Traits.

Am J Hum Genet 2017 Jun 25;100(6):865-884. Epub 2017 May 25.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London W2 1PG, UK; Department of Cardiology, Ealing Hospital NHS Trust, Middlesex UB1 3EU, UK.

Deep sequence-based imputation can enhance the discovery power of genome-wide association studies by assessing previously unexplored variation across the common- and low-frequency spectra. We applied a hybrid whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and deep imputation approach to examine the broader allelic architecture of 12 anthropometric traits associated with height, body mass, and fat distribution in up to 267,616 individuals. We report 106 genome-wide significant signals that have not been previously identified, including 9 low-frequency variants pointing to functional candidates. Of the 106 signals, 6 are in genomic regions that have not been implicated with related traits before, 28 are independent signals at previously reported regions, and 72 represent previously reported signals for a different anthropometric trait. 71% of signals reside within genes and fine mapping resolves 23 signals to one or two likely causal variants. We confirm genetic overlap between human monogenic and polygenic anthropometric traits and find signal enrichment in cis expression QTLs in relevant tissues. Our results highlight the potential of WGS strategies to enhance biologically relevant discoveries across the frequency spectrum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.04.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5473732PMC
June 2017

Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity - A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults.

PLoS Genet 2017 Apr 27;13(4):e1006528. Epub 2017 Apr 27.

Estonian Genome Center, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.

Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006528DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5407576PMC
April 2017

and Loci Associate with Plasma Osmolality.

J Am Soc Nephrol 2017 Aug 30;28(8):2311-2321. Epub 2017 Mar 30.

Due to the number of contributing authors, the affiliations are listed in the supplemental material.

Disorders of water balance, an excess or deficit of total body water relative to body electrolyte content, are common and ascertained by plasma hypo- or hypernatremia, respectively. We performed a two-stage genome-wide association study meta-analysis on plasma sodium concentration in 45,889 individuals of European descent (stage 1 discovery) and 17,637 additional individuals of European descent (stage 2 replication), and a transethnic meta-analysis of replicated single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 79,506 individuals (63,526 individuals of European descent, 8765 individuals of Asian Indian descent, and 7215 individuals of African descent). In stage 1, we identified eight loci associated with plasma sodium concentration at <5.0 × 10 Of these, rs9980 at replicated in stage 2 meta-analysis (=3.1 × 10), with combined stages 1 and 2 genome-wide significance of =5.6 × 10 Transethnic meta-analysis further supported the association at rs9980 (=5.9 × 10). Additionally, rs16846053 at showed nominally, but not genome-wide, significant association in combined stages 1 and 2 meta-analysis (=6.7 × 10). encodes a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor that coordinates the intracellular response to hypertonic stress but was not previously implicated in the regulation of systemic water balance. encodes a sodium bicarbonate transporter with a brain-restricted expression pattern, and variant rs16846053 affects a putative intronic NFAT5 DNA binding motif. The lead variants for and are expression quantitative trait loci in tissues of the central nervous system and relevant to transcriptional regulation. Thus, genetic variation in and expression and function in the central nervous system may affect the regulation of systemic water balance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2016080892DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5533231PMC
August 2017

A Low-Frequency Inactivating Variant Enriched in the Finnish Population Is Associated With Fasting Insulin Levels and Type 2 Diabetes Risk.

Diabetes 2017 07 24;66(7):2019-2032. Epub 2017 Mar 24.

Diabetes and Endocrinology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Malmö, Sweden.

To identify novel coding association signals and facilitate characterization of mechanisms influencing glycemic traits and type 2 diabetes risk, we analyzed 109,215 variants derived from exome array genotyping together with an additional 390,225 variants from exome sequence in up to 39,339 normoglycemic individuals from five ancestry groups. We identified a novel association between the coding variant (p.Pro50Thr) in and fasting plasma insulin (FI), a gene in which rare fully penetrant mutations are causal for monogenic glycemic disorders. The low-frequency allele is associated with a 12% increase in FI levels. This variant is present at 1.1% frequency in Finns but virtually absent in individuals from other ancestries. Carriers of the FI-increasing allele had increased 2-h insulin values, decreased insulin sensitivity, and increased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 1.05). In cellular studies, the AKT2-Thr50 protein exhibited a partial loss of function. We extend the allelic spectrum for coding variants in associated with disorders of glucose homeostasis and demonstrate bidirectional effects of variants within the pleckstrin homology domain of .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db16-1329DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5482074PMC
July 2017

Epigenome-wide association study of body mass index, and the adverse outcomes of adiposity.

Nature 2017 01 21;541(7635):81-86. Epub 2016 Dec 21.

German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), München-Neuherberg, Germany.

Approximately 1.5 billion people worldwide are overweight or affected by obesity, and are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and related metabolic and inflammatory disturbances. Although the mechanisms linking adiposity to associated clinical conditions are poorly understood, recent studies suggest that adiposity may influence DNA methylation, a key regulator of gene expression and molecular phenotype. Here we use epigenome-wide association to show that body mass index (BMI; a key measure of adiposity) is associated with widespread changes in DNA methylation (187 genetic loci with P < 1 × 10, range P = 9.2 × 10 to 6.0 × 10; n = 10,261 samples). Genetic association analyses demonstrate that the alterations in DNA methylation are predominantly the consequence of adiposity, rather than the cause. We find that methylation loci are enriched for functional genomic features in multiple tissues (P < 0.05), and show that sentinel methylation markers identify gene expression signatures at 38 loci (P < 9.0 × 10, range P = 5.5 × 10 to 6.1 × 10, n = 1,785 samples). The methylation loci identify genes involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, substrate transport and inflammatory pathways. Finally, we show that the disturbances in DNA methylation predict future development of type 2 diabetes (relative risk per 1 standard deviation increase in methylation risk score: 2.3 (2.07-2.56); P = 1.1 × 10). Our results provide new insights into the biologic pathways influenced by adiposity, and may enable development of new strategies for prediction and prevention of type 2 diabetes and other adverse clinical consequences of obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature20784DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5570525PMC
January 2017