Publications by authors named "Benjamin J Cossette"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Titrating Polyarginine into Nanofibers Enhances Cyclic-Dinucleotide Adjuvanticity and after Sublingual Immunization.

ACS Biomater Sci Eng 2021 Mar 27. Epub 2021 Mar 27.

Biomedical Engineering Department, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, United States.

Effective sublingual peptide immunization requires overcoming challenges of both delivery and immunogenicity. Mucosal adjuvants, such as cyclic-dinucleotides (CDN), can promote sublingual immune responses but must be codelivered with the antigen to the epithelium for maximum effect. We designed peptide-polymer nanofibers (PEG-Q11) displaying nona-arginine (R9) at a high density to promote complexation with CDNs bidentate hydrogen-bonding with arginine side chains. We coassembled PEG-Q11 and PEG-Q11R9 peptides to titrate the concentration of R9 within nanofibers. , PEG-Q11R9 fibers and cyclic-di-GMP or cyclic-di-AMP adjuvants had a synergistic effect on enhancing dendritic cell activation that was STING-dependent and increased monotonically with increasing R9 concentration. The polyvalent display of R9 on assembled nanofibers was significantly more effective at promoting CDN-mediated DC activation than mixing nanofibers with an equimolar concentration of unassembled R9 peptide. The sublingual administration of nanofibers revealed a bell-shaped trend between increasing R9 concentration and enhancements to antigen trafficking and the activation of DCs in the draining lymph nodes. Intermediate levels of R9 within sublingually administered PEG-Q11 fibers were optimal for immunization, suggesting a balance between polyarginine's ability to sequester CDNs along the nanofiber and its potentially detrimental mucoadhesive interactions. These findings present a potentially generalizable biomaterial strategy for enhancing the potency of CDN adjuvants and reveal important design considerations for the nascent field of sublingual biomaterial immunization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsbiomaterials.0c01429DOI Listing
March 2021

Targeting HIV Env immunogens to B cell follicles in nonhuman primates through immune complex or protein nanoparticle formulations.

NPJ Vaccines 2020 Aug 5;5(1):72. Epub 2020 Aug 5.

Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA.

Following immunization, high-affinity antibody responses develop within germinal centers (GCs), specialized sites within follicles of the lymph node (LN) where B cells proliferate and undergo somatic hypermutation. Antigen availability within GCs is important, as B cells must acquire and present antigen to follicular helper T cells to drive this process. However, recombinant protein immunogens such as soluble human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope (Env) trimers do not efficiently accumulate in follicles following traditional immunization. Here, we demonstrate two strategies to concentrate HIV Env immunogens in follicles, via the formation of immune complexes (ICs) or by employing self-assembling protein nanoparticles for multivalent display of Env antigens. Using rhesus macaques, we show that within a few days following immunization, free trimers were present in a diffuse pattern in draining LNs, while trimer ICs and Env nanoparticles accumulated in B cell follicles. Whole LN imaging strikingly revealed that ICs and trimer nanoparticles concentrated in as many as 500 follicles in a single LN within two days after immunization. Imaging of LNs collected seven days postimmunization showed that Env nanoparticles persisted on follicular dendritic cells in the light zone of nascent GCs. These findings suggest that the form of antigen administered in vaccination can dramatically impact localization in lymphoid tissues and provides a new rationale for the enhanced immune responses observed following immunization with ICs or nanoparticles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41541-020-00223-1DOI Listing
August 2020

Targeting HIV Env immunogens to B cell follicles in nonhuman primates through immune complex or protein nanoparticle formulations.

NPJ Vaccines 2020 5;5:72. Epub 2020 Aug 5.

Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.

Following immunization, high-affinity antibody responses develop within germinal centers (GCs), specialized sites within follicles of the lymph node (LN) where B cells proliferate and undergo somatic hypermutation. Antigen availability within GCs is important, as B cells must acquire and present antigen to follicular helper T cells to drive this process. However, recombinant protein immunogens such as soluble human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope (Env) trimers do not efficiently accumulate in follicles following traditional immunization. Here, we demonstrate two strategies to concentrate HIV Env immunogens in follicles, via the formation of immune complexes (ICs) or by employing self-assembling protein nanoparticles for multivalent display of Env antigens. Using rhesus macaques, we show that within a few days following immunization, free trimers were present in a diffuse pattern in draining LNs, while trimer ICs and Env nanoparticles accumulated in B cell follicles. Whole LN imaging strikingly revealed that ICs and trimer nanoparticles concentrated in as many as 500 follicles in a single LN within two days after immunization. Imaging of LNs collected seven days postimmunization showed that Env nanoparticles persisted on follicular dendritic cells in the light zone of nascent GCs. These findings suggest that the form of antigen administered in vaccination can dramatically impact localization in lymphoid tissues and provides a new rationale for the enhanced immune responses observed following immunization with ICs or nanoparticles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41541-020-00223-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7406516PMC
August 2020