Publications by authors named "Benedikt Büttner"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Camostat Mesylate May Reduce Severity of Coronavirus Disease 2019 Sepsis: A First Observation.

Crit Care Explor 2020 Nov 16;2(11):e0284. Epub 2020 Nov 16.

Department of Anesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 cell entry depends on angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and transmembrane serine protease 2 and is blocked in cell culture by camostat mesylate, a clinically proven protease inhibitor. Whether camostat mesylate is able to lower disease burden in coronavirus disease 2019 sepsis is currently unknown.

Design: Retrospective observational case series.

Setting: Patient treated in ICU of University hospital Göttingen, Germany.

Patients: Eleven critical ill coronavirus disease 2019 patients with organ failure were treated in ICU.

Interventions: Compassionate use of camostat mesylate (six patients, camostat group) or hydroxychloroquine (five patients, hydroxychloroquine group).

Measurements And Main Results: Clinical courses were assessed by Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score at days 1, 3, and 8. Further, viral load, oxygenation, and inflammatory markers were determined. Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score was comparable between camostat and hydroxychloroquine groups upon ICU admission. During observation, the Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score decreased in the camostat group but remained elevated in the hydroxychloroquine group. The decline in disease severity in camostat mesylate treated patients was paralleled by a decline in inflammatory markers and improvement of oxygenation.

Conclusions: The severity of coronavirus disease 2019 decreased upon camostat mesylate treatment within a period of 8 days and a similar effect was not observed in patients receiving hydroxychloroquine. Camostat mesylate thus warrants further evaluation within randomized clinical trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCE.0000000000000284DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7671878PMC
November 2020

TIM-3 Genetic Variants Are Associated with Altered Clinical Outcome and Susceptibility to Gram-Positive Infections in Patients with Sepsis.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Nov 6;21(21). Epub 2020 Nov 6.

Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center, Georg August University, D-37075 Goettingen, Germany.

: Previous studies have reported the fundamental role of immunoregulatory proteins in the clinical phenotype and outcome of sepsis. This study investigated two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing protein 3 (TIM-3), which has a negative stimulatory function in the T cell immune response. : Patients with sepsis ( = 712) were prospectively enrolled from three intensive care units (ICUs) at the University Medical Center Goettingen since 2012. All patients were genotyped for the TIM-3 SNPs rs1036199 and rs10515746. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality. Disease severity and microbiological findings were secondary endpoints. : Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated a significantly lower 28-day mortality for TIM-3 rs1036199 AA homozygous patients compared to C-allele carriers (18% vs. 27%, = 0.0099) and TIM-3 rs10515746 CC homozygous patients compared to A-allele carriers (18% vs. 26%, = 0.0202). The TIM-3 rs1036199 AA genotype and rs10515746 CC genotype remained significant predictors for 28-day mortality in the multivariate Cox regression analysis after adjustment for relevant confounders (adjusted hazard ratios: 0.67 and 0.70). Additionally, patients carrying the rs1036199 AA genotype presented more Gram-positive and infections, and rs10515746 CC homozygotes presented more infections. : The studied TIM-3 genetic variants are associated with altered 28-day mortality and susceptibility to Gram-positive infections in sepsis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21218318DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7664272PMC
November 2020

Favorable 90-Day Mortality in Obese Caucasian Patients with Septic Shock According to the Sepsis-3 Definition.

J Clin Med 2019 Dec 24;9(1). Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center, Georg August University, D-37075 Goettingen, Germany.

Septic shock is a frequent life-threatening condition and a leading cause of mortality in intensive care units (ICUs). Previous investigations have reported a potentially protective effect of obesity in septic shock patients. However, prior results have been inconsistent, focused on short-term in-hospital mortality and inadequately adjusted for confounders, and they have rarely applied the currently valid Sepsis-3 definition criteria for septic shock. This investigation examined the effect of obesity on 90-day mortality in patients with septic shock selected from a prospectively enrolled cohort of septic patients. A total of 352 patients who met the Sepsis-3 criteria for septic shock were enrolled in this study. Body-mass index (BMI) was used to divide the cohort into 24% obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m) and 76% non-obese (BMI < 30 kg/m) patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a significantly lower 90-day mortality (31% vs. 43%; = 0.0436) in obese patients compared to non-obese patients. Additional analyses of baseline characteristics, disease severity, and microbiological findings outlined further statistically significant differences among the groups. Multivariate Cox regression analysis estimated a significant protective effect of obesity on 90-day mortality after adjustment for confounders. An understanding of the underlying physiologic mechanisms may improve therapeutic strategies and patient prognosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9010046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7019854PMC
December 2019

Subparaneural Injection in Popliteal Sciatic Nerve Blocks Evaluated by MRI.

Open Med (Wars) 2019 24;14:346-353. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Department of Anesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert-Koch Str. 40, 37075 Goettingen, Germany.

Intraneural injection of a local anesthetic can damage the nerve, yet it occurs frequently during distal sciatic block with no neurological sequelae. This has led to a controversy about the optimal needle tip placement that results from the particular anatomy of the sciatic nerve with its paraneural sheath. The study population included patients undergoing lower extremity surgery under popliteal sciatic nerve block. Ultrasound-guidance was used to position the needle tip subparaneurally and to monitor the injection of the local anesthetic. Sonography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the extent of the subparaneural injection. Twenty-two patients participated. The median sciatic cross-sectional area increased from 57.8 mm2 pre-block to 110.8 mm immediately post-block. An intraneural injection according to the current definition was seen in 21 patients. Two patients had sonographic evidence of an intrafascicular injection, which was confirmed by MRI in one patient (the other patient refused further examinations). No patient reported any neurological symptoms. A subparaneural injection in the popliteal segment of the distal sciatic nerve is actually rarely intraneural, i.e. intrafascicular. This may explain the discrepancy between the conventional sonographic evidence of an intraneural injection and the lack of neurological sequelae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2019-0034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6534099PMC
April 2019

Lack of an Association between the Functional Polymorphism TREM-1 rs2234237 and the Clinical Course of Sepsis among Critically Ill Caucasian Patients-A Monocentric Prospective Genetic Association Study.

J Clin Med 2019 Mar 3;8(3). Epub 2019 Mar 3.

Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center, Georg August University, D-37075 Goettingen, Germany.

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition and a significant challenge for those working in intensive care, where it remains one of the leading causes of mortality. According to the sepsis-3 definition, sepsis is characterized by dysregulation of the host response to infection. The TREM-1 gene codes for the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1, which is part of the pro-inflammatory response of the immune system. This study aimed to determine whether the functional TREM-1 rs2234237 single nucleotide polymorphism was associated with mortality in a cohort of 649 Caucasian patients with sepsis. The 90-day mortality rate was the primary outcome, and disease severity and microbiological findings were analyzed as secondary endpoints. TREM-1 rs2234237 TT homozygous patients were compared to A-allele carriers for this purpose. Kaplan⁻Meier survival analysis revealed no association between the clinically relevant TREM-1 rs2234237 single nucleotide polymorphism and the 90-day or 28-day survival rate in this group of septic patients. In addition, the performed analyses of disease severity and the microbiological findings did not show significant differences between the TREM-1 rs2234237 genotypes. The TREM-1 rs2234237 genotype was not significantly associated with sepsis mortality and sepsis disease severity. Therefore, it was not a valuable prognostic marker for the survival of septic patients in the studied cohort.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm8030301DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6463065PMC
March 2019

CTLA-4 Genetic Variants Predict Survival in Patients with Sepsis.

J Clin Med 2019 Jan 10;8(1). Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center, Georg August University, D-37075 Goettingen, Germany.

Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) is a coinhibitory checkpoint protein expressed on the surface of T cells. A recent study by our working group revealed that the rs231775 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the CTLA-4 gene was associated with the survival of patients with sepsis and served as an independent prognostic variable. To further investigate the impact of CTLA-4 genetic variants on sepsis survival, we examined the effect of two functional SNPs, CTLA-4 rs733618 and CTLA-4 rs3087243, and inferred haplotypes, on the survival of 644 prospectively enrolled septic patients. Kaplan⁻Meier survival analysis revealed significantly lower 90-day mortality for rs3087243 G allele carriers ( = 502) than for AA-homozygous ( = 142) patients (27.3% vs. 40.8%, = 0.0024). Likewise, lower 90-day mortality was observed for TAA haplotype-negative patients ( = 197; compound rs733618 T/rs231775 A/rs3087243 A) than for patients carrying the TAA haplotype ( = 447; 24.4% vs. 32.9%, = 0.0265). Carrying the rs3087243 G allele hazard ratio (HR): 0.667; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.489⁻0.909; = 0.0103) or not carrying the TAA haplotype (HR: 0.685; 95% CI: 0.491⁻0.956; = 0.0262) remained significant covariates for 90-day survival in the multivariate Cox regression analysis and thus served as independent prognostic variables. In conclusion, our findings underscore the significance of CTLA-4 genetic variants as predictors of survival of patients with sepsis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm8010070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6352177PMC
January 2019

Anaemia requiring red blood cell transfusion is associated with unfavourable 90-day survival in surgical patients with sepsis.

BMC Res Notes 2018 Dec 11;11(1):879. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center, Georg August University, Goettingen, Germany.

Objective: The mortality associated with sepsis remains unacceptably high, despite modern high-quality intensive care. Based on the results from previous studies, anaemia and its management in patients with sepsis appear to impact outcomes; however, the transfusion policy is still being debated, and the ideal approach may be extremely specific to the individual. This study aimed to investigate the long-term impact of anaemia requiring red blood cell (RBC) transfusion on mortality and disease severity in patients with sepsis. We studied a general surgical intensive care unit (ICU) population, excluding cardiac surgery patients. 435 patients were enrolled in this observational study between 2012 and 2016.

Results: Patients who received RBC transfusion between 28 days before and 28 days after the development of sepsis (n = 302) exhibited a significantly higher 90-day mortality rate (34.1% vs 19.6%; P = 0.004, Kaplan-Meier analysis). This association remained significant after adjusting for confounders in the multivariate Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.03-2.73; P = 0.035). Patients who received transfusions also showed significantly higher morbidity scores, such as SOFA scores, and ICU lengths of stay compared to patients without transfusions (n = 133). Our results indicate that anaemia and RBC transfusion are associated with unfavourable outcomes in patients with sepsis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-018-3988-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6290543PMC
December 2018

Paths of femoral nerve catheters placed using ultrasound-guided in plane vs out of plane techniques: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Oct;97(43):e12958

Department of Anesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center, University of Goettingen, Goettingen.

Background: Continuous blockade of the femoral nerve is widely used for postoperative analgesia after hip surgery. It can be achieved by ultrasound-guided placement of a femoral nerve catheter via either the in plane (IP) or out of plane (OOP) technique. On the basis of postoperative radiographs, we evaluated the paths of femoral nerve catheters with respect to both techniques and its effect on postoperative analgesia.

Methods: Thirty-four patients were randomized to receive a radiopaque femoral nerve catheter via either the IP or OOP technique. The paths and tip position of the catheters were evaluated in postoperative frontal radiographs of the operated hip joint concerning a predefined target region and four neighboring regions. Pain scores were assessed using a numeric rating scale (0-10).

Results: Sixteen IP patients and 18 OOP patients were included in the study. The catheter path was radiographically evaluated in 13 IP patients and in 10 OOP patients. The catheter tips were located within the target region in 39% of the IP group and in 50% of the OOP group. The catheter tip was 0.00 cm [-3.80 to 3.84] and -1.19 cm [-12.27 to 0.00] (median [range]) from the target region in the OOP group and IP group, respectively (P = .045). Catheters flipped distally more often in the IP group (IP: 61.5%, OOP: 10.0%; P = .01). There were no marked differences in the pain scores of either group.

Conclusion: Femoral nerve catheters inserted by the ultrasound-guided IP technique flip distally more frequently than catheters inserted by the OOP technique. Moreover, the distance between the catheter tip and the trunk of the femoral nerve is greater for IP catheters than for OOP catheters. Despite these findings, postoperative analgesia did not seem to differ between the 2 techniques.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000012958DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6221616PMC
October 2018

The CTLA-4 rs231775 GG genotype is associated with favorable 90-day survival in Caucasian patients with sepsis.

Sci Rep 2018 10 11;8(1):15140. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center, Georg August University, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075, Goettingen, Germany.

Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) is a surface protein on T cells, that has an inhibitory effect on the host immune reaction and prevents overreaction of the immune system. Because the functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs231775 of the CTLA-4 gene is associated with autoimmune diseases and because of the critical role of the immune reaction in sepsis, we intended to examine the effect of this polymorphism on survival in patients with sepsis. 644 septic adult Caucasian patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were followed up for 90 days. Mortality risk within this period was defined as primary outcome parameter. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a significantly lower 90-day mortality risk among GG homozygous patients (n = 101) than among A allele carriers (n = 543; 22% and 32%, respectively; p = 0.03565). Furthermore, the CTLA-4 rs231775 GG genotype remained a significant covariate for 90-day mortality risk after controlling for confounders in the multivariate Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio: 0.624; 95% CI: 0.399-0.975; p = 0.03858). In conclusion, our study provides the first evidence for CTLA-4 rs231775 as a prognostic variable for the survival of patients with sepsis and emphasizes the need for further research to reveal potential functional associations between CTLA-4 and the immune pathophysiology of sepsis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-33246-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6181961PMC
October 2018

Prehospital ultrasound-guided nerve blocks improve reduction-feasibility of dislocated extremity injuries compared to systemic analgesia. A randomized controlled trial.

PLoS One 2018 2;13(7):e0199776. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Department of Anesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center, University of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany.

Background: Out-of-hospital analgosedation in trauma patients is challenging for emergency physicians due to associated complications. We compared peripheral nerve block (PNB) with analgosedation (AS) as an analgetic approach for patients with isolated extremity injury, assuming that prehospital required medical interventions (e.g. reduction, splinting of dislocation injury) using PNB are less painful and more feasible compared to AS.

Methods: Thirty patients (aged 18 or older) were randomized to receive either ultrasound-guided PNB (10 mL prilocaine 1%, 10 mL ropivacaine 0.2%) or analgosedation (midazolam combined with s-ketamine or with fentanyl). Reduction-feasibility was classified (easy, intermediate, impossible) and pain scores were assessed using numeric rating scales (NRS 0-10).

Results: Eighteen patients were included in the PNB-group and twelve in the AS-group; 15 and 9 patients, respectively, suffered dislocation injury. In the PNB-group, reduction was more feasible (easy: 80.0%, impossible: 20.0%) compared to the AS-group (easy: 22.2%, intermediate: 22.2%, impossible: 55.6%; p = 0.01). During medical interventions, 5.6% [1/18] of the PNB-patients and 58.3% [7/12] of the AS-patients experienced pain (p<0.01). Recorded pain scores were significantly lower in the PNB-group during prehospital medical intervention (median[IQR] NRS PNB: 0[0-0]) compared to the AS-group (6[0-8]; p<0.001) as well as on first day post presentation (NRS PNB: 1[0-5], AS: 5[5-7]; p = 0.050). All patients of the PNB-group would recommend their analgesic technique (AS: 50.0%, p<0.01).

Conclusions: Prehospital ultrasound-guided PNB is rapidly performed in extremity injuries with high success. Compared to the commonly used AS in trauma patients, PNB significantly reduces pain intensity and severity.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0199776PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6028078PMC
January 2019

Pre-hospital transthoracic echocardiography for early identification of non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

Crit Care 2018 02 7;22(1):29. Epub 2018 Feb 7.

Department of Anesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Str. 40, 37075, Göttingen, Germany.

Background: Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) is a common manifestation of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), but delayed diagnosis can increase mortality. In this proof of principle study, the emergency physician performed transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) on scene to determine whether NSTEMI could be correctly diagnosed pre-hospitalization. This could expedite admission to the appropriate facility and reduce the delay until initiation of correct therapy.

Methods: Pre-hospital TTE was performed on scene by the emergency physician in patients presenting with ACS but without ST-elevation in the initial 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) (NSTE-ACS). A presumptive NSTEMI diagnosis was made if regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) were detected. These patients were admitted directly to a specialist cardiac facility. Patient characteristics and pre-admission and post-admission clinical, pre-hospital TTE data, and therapeutic measures were recorded.

Results: Patients with NSTE-ACS (n = 53; 72.5 ± 13.4 years of age; 23 female) were studied. The 20 patients with pre-hospital RWMA and presumptive NSTEMI, and two without RWMA were conclusively diagnosed with NSTEMI in hospital. Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed in 50% of the patients presumed to have NSTEMI immediately after admission. The RWMA seen before hospital TTE corresponded with the in-hospital ECG findings and/or the supply regions of the occluded coronary vessels seen during PCI in 85% of the cases. The diagnostic sensitivity of pre-hospital TTE for NSTEMI was 90.9% with 100% specificity.

Conclusions: Pre-hospital transthoracic echocardiography by the emergency physician can correctly diagnose NSTEMI in more than 90% of cases. This can expedite the initiation of appropriate therapy and could thereby conceivably reduce morbidity and mortality.

Trial Registration: Deutsche Register klinischer Studien, DRKS00004919 . Registered on 29 April 2013.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13054-017-1929-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5802056PMC
February 2018

The FER rs4957796 TT genotype is associated with unfavorable 90-day survival in Caucasian patients with severe ARDS due to pneumonia.

Sci Rep 2017 08 29;7(1):9887. Epub 2017 Aug 29.

Department of Anaesthesiology, University Medical Centre, Georg August University, Robert-Koch-Str.40, D-37075, Goettingen, Germany.

A recent genome-wide association study showed that a genetic variant within the FER gene is associated with survival in patients with sepsis due to pneumonia. Because severe pneumonia is the main cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we aimed to investigate the effect of the FER polymorphism rs4957796 on the 90-day survival in patients with ARDS due to pneumonia. An assessment of a prospectively collected cohort of 441 patients with ARDS admitted to three intensive care units at the University Medical Centre identified 274 patients with ARDS due to pneumonia. The 90-day mortality risk was recorded as the primary outcome parameter. Sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores and organ support-free days were used as the secondary variables. FER rs4957796 TT-homozygous patients were compared with C-allele carriers. The survival analysis revealed a higher 90-day mortality risk among T homozygotes than among C-allele carriers (p = 0.0144) exclusively in patients with severe ARDS due to pneumonia. The FER rs4957796 TT genotype remained a significant covariate for the 90-day mortality risk in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 4.62; 95% CI, 1.58-13.50; p = 0.0050). In conclusion, FER rs4957796 might act as a prognostic variable for survival in patients with severe ARDS due to pneumonia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-08540-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5575093PMC
August 2017

Combination of general anesthesia and peripheral nerve block with low-dose ropivacaine reduces postoperative pain for several days after outpatient arthroscopy: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2017 Feb;96(6):e6046

Department of Anesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.

Background: Effective methods for postoperative pain relief are an important concern in outpatient surgery. For arthroscopies we combine a single-shot peripheral nerve block using low-volume, low-concentration ropivacaine with general anesthesia. We hypothesized that the patients would have less postoperative pain and be more rapidly home ready than after general anesthesia alone.

Methods: Patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III, 18-80 years old) scheduled for outpatient arthroscopy on the upper or lower extremity were randomized to have either a combination of peripheral nerve block and general anesthesia (NB + GA, study group) or general anesthesia alone (GA, control group). The relevant nerve was localized by ultrasound and 10 mL ropivacaine 0.2% was injected. General anesthesia was with propofol and remifentanil. Numeric rating scales were used to assess pain and patient satisfaction in the recovery room, on the evening of surgery, and on the following 2 days.

Results: A total of 120 patients participated in the study (NB + GA: 61; GA: 59). The percentage of patients reporting relevant pain in the recovery room were 0% versus 44% (P < 0.001), on the evening after surgery 3% versus 80% (P < 0.001), and on days 1 and 2 postsurgery 12% versus 73% and 12% versus 64% (NB + GA vs GA, respectively). Median time to home discharge was NB + GA 34.5 min (range 15-90) versus GA 55 min (20-115) (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: The combination of a peripheral nerve block with low-dose ropivacaine and general anesthesia reduced postoperative pain compared with general anesthesia alone for several days after outpatient arthroscopy. It also shortened the time to home discharge.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000006046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5313006PMC
February 2017

Ketamine in outpatient arthroscopic shoulder surgery: Effects on postoperative pain, hemodynamic stability and process times.

Open Med (Wars) 2015 28;10(1):297-305. Epub 2015 May 28.

Center for Anesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Göttingen, Robert-Koch Str. 40, 37075 Göttingen, Germany, Tel.: +49 551 396051.

Background: Pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery is often severe, and establishing a pain treatment regimen that does not delay discharge can be challenging. The reported ability of ketamine to prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia has not been investigated in this particular setting.

Methods: 300 adult patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy under general anesthesia were recruited for this observational clinical trial and were allotted to either receive 1mg/kg IV bolus of ketamine before surgery (ketamine group, KG) or to a control group (CG) without ketamine. NRS pain scores were obtained on the operative day and on postoperative days 1 and 2 and compared between groups. Secondary variables were blood pressure, heart rate, process times, satisfaction with the anesthetic and unwanted effects.

Results: Pain severity did not differ significantly between the groups at any time. Propofol injection rate and cumulative dose were higher in the KG. Heart rates and blood pressures were similar. Time to emergence and time in PACU were longer and vomiting was more frequent in patients given ketamine.

Conclusion: Preoperative low-dose ketamine added to a general anesthetic does not reduce perioperative pain after outpatient shoulder arthroscopy. It increases procedural times and the incidence of PONV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2015-0043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5152989PMC
May 2015

Blood pressure response to combined general anaesthesia/interscalene brachial plexus block for outpatient shoulder arthroscopy.

BMC Anesthesiol 2014 30;14:50. Epub 2014 Jun 30.

Department of Anaesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Göttingen Medical School, Robert-Koch Str. 40, Göttingen 37075, Germany.

Background: Shoulder surgery is often performed in the beach-chair position, a position associated with arterial hypotension and subsequent risk of cerebral ischaemia. It can be performed under general anaesthesia or with an interscalene brachial plexus block, each of which has specific advantages but also specific negative effects on blood pressure control. It would be worthwhile to combine the advantages of the two, but the effects of the combination on the circulation are not well investigated. We studied blood pressure, heart rate, and incidence of adverse circulatory events in patients undergoing shoulder surgery in general anaesthesia with or without an interscalene block.

Methods: Prospective, randomised, blinded study in outpatients (age 18 to 80 years) undergoing shoulder arthroscopy. General anaesthesia was with propofol/opioid, interscalene block with 40 ml 1% mepivacaine. Hypotension requiring treatment was defined as a mean arterial pressure <60 mmHg or a systolic pressure <80% of baseline; relevant bradycardia was a heart rate <50 bpm with a decrease in blood pressure.

Results: Forty-two patients had general anaesthesia alone, 41 had general anaesthesia plus interscalene block. The average systolic blood pressure under anaesthesia in the beach-chair position was 114 ± 7.3 vs. 116 ± 8.3 mmHg (p = 0.09; all comparisons General vs. General-Regional). The incidence of a mean arterial pressure under 60 mmHg or a decrease in systolic pressure of more than 20% from baseline was 64% vs. 76% (p = 0.45). The number of patients with a heart rate lower than 50 and a concomitant blood pressure decrease was 8 vs. 5 (p = 0.30).

Conclusion: One can safely combine interscalene block with general anaesthesia for surgery in the beach-chair position in ASA I and II patients.

Clinical Trial Number: DRKS00005295.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2253-14-50DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4083130PMC
October 2015

The effect of changing the sequence of cuff inflation and device fixation with the LMA-Supreme® on device position, ventilatory complications, and airway morbidity: a clinical and fiberscopic study.

BMC Anesthesiol 2014 Jan 4;14. Epub 2014 Jan 4.

Department of Anaesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Göttingen Medical School, Robert-Koch Str, 40, 37075 Göttingen, Germany.

Background: The conventional sequence when using supraglottic airway devices is insertion, cuff inflation and fixation. Our hypothesis was that a tighter fit of the cuff and tip could be achieved with a consequently lower incidence of air leak, better separation of gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts and less airway morbidity if the device were first affixed and the cuff then inflated.

Methods: Our clinical review board approved the study (public registry number DRKS00003174). An LMA Supreme® was inserted into 184 patients undergoing lower limb arthroscopy in propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia who were randomly assigned to either the control (inflation then fixation; n = 92) or study group (fixation then inflation; n = 92). The cuff was inflated to 60 cmH2O. The patients' lungs were ventilated in pressure-controlled mode with 5 cmH2O PEEP, Pmax to give 6 ml kg-1 tidal volume, and respiratory rate adjusted to end-tidal CO2 of 4.8 and 5.6 kPa. Correct cuff and tip position were determined by leak detection, capnometry trace, oropharyngeal leak pressure, suprasternal notch test, and lube-tube test. Bowl and cuff position and the presence of glottic narrowing were assessed by fiberscopic examination. Postoperative dysphagia, hoarseness and sore throat were assessed with a questionnaire. Ventilatory impairment was defined as a tidal volume < 6 ml kg-1 with Pmax at oropharyngeal leak pressure, glottic narrowing was defined as an angle between the vocal cords under 16 degrees.

Results: The incidence of incorrect device position (18% vs. 21%), failed ventilation (10% vs. 9%), leak pressure (24.8 vs. 25.2 cmH2O, p = 0.63), failed lube-tube test (16.3% vs. 17.6%) and glottic narrowing (19.3% vs. 14.1%, p = 0.35) was similar in both groups (control vs. study, resp.). When glottic narrowing occurred, it was more frequently associated with ventilatory impairment in the control group (77% vs. 39%; p = 0.04). Airway morbidity was more common in the control group (33% vs. 19%; p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Altering the sequence of cuff inflation and device fixation does not affect device position, oropharyngeal leak pressures or separation of gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. It reduces the incidence of glottic narrowing with impaired ventilation and also perioperative airway morbidity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2253-14-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3890616PMC
January 2014