Publications by authors named "Benedetta Cabiati"

4 Publications

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Sleeping Beauty-engineered CAR T cells achieve antileukemic activity without severe toxicities.

J Clin Invest 2020 11;130(11):6021-6033

Tettamanti Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Milano-Bicocca/Fondazione MBBM, Monza, Italy.

BACKGROUNDChimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell immunotherapy has resulted in complete remission (CR) and durable response in highly refractory patients. However, logistical complexity and high costs of manufacturing autologous viral products limit CAR T cell availability.METHODSWe report the early results of a phase I/II trial in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) patients relapsed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using donor-derived CD19 CAR T cells generated with the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon and differentiated into cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells.RESULTSThe cellular product was produced successfully for all patients from the donor peripheral blood (PB) and consisted mostly of CD3+ lymphocytes with 43% CAR expression. Four pediatric and 9 adult patients were infused with a single dose of CAR T cells. Toxicities reported were 2 grade I and 1 grade II cytokine-release syndrome (CRS) cases at the highest dose in the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), neurotoxicity, or dose-limiting toxicities. Six out of 7 patients receiving the highest doses achieved CR and CR with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) at day 28. Five out of 6 patients in CR were also minimal residual disease negative (MRD-). Robust expansion was achieved in the majority of the patients. CAR T cells were measurable by transgene copy PCR up to 10 months. Integration site analysis showed a positive safety profile and highly polyclonal repertoire in vitro and at early time points after infusion.CONCLUSIONSB-engineered CAR T cells expand and persist in pediatric and adult B-ALL patients relapsed after HSCT. Antileukemic activity was achieved without severe toxicities.TRIAL REGISTRATIONClinicalTrials.gov NCT03389035.FUNDINGThis study was supported by grants from the Fondazione AIRC per la Ricerca sul Cancro (AIRC); Cancer Research UK (CRUK); the Fundación Científica de la Asociación Española Contra el Cáncer (FC AECC); Ministero Della Salute; Fondazione Regionale per la Ricerca Biomedica (FRRB).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI138473DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7598053PMC
November 2020

Phase II Study of Sequential Infusion of Donor Lymphocyte Infusion and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells for Patients Relapsed after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Dec 13;23(12):2070-2078. Epub 2017 Jul 13.

USC Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy; Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan Italy.

Seventy-four patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation were enrolled in a phase IIA study and treated with the sequential infusion of donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) followed by cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells. Seventy-three patients were available for the intention to treat analysis. At least 1 infusion of CIK cells was given to 59 patients, whereas 43 patients received the complete cell therapy planned (58%). Overall, 12 patients (16%) developed acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) of grades I to II in 7 cases and grades III to IV in 5). In 8 of 12 cases, aGVHD developed during DLI treatment, leading to interruption of the cellular program in 3 patients, whereas in the remaining 5 cases aGVHD was controlled by steroids treatment, thus allowing the subsequent planned administration of CIK cells. Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was observed in 11 patients (15%). A complete response was observed in 19 (26%), partial response in 3 (4%), stable disease in 8 (11%), early death in 2 (3%), and disease progression in 41 (56%). At 1 and 3 years, rates of progression-free survival were 31% and 29%, whereas rates of overall survival were 51% and 40%, respectively. By multivariate analysis, the type of relapse, the presence of cGVHD, and a short (<6 months) time from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to relapse were the significant predictors of survival. In conclusion, a low incidence of GVHD is observed after the sequential administration of DLI and CIK cells, and disease control can be achieved mostly after a cytogenetic or molecular relapse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.07.005DOI Listing
December 2017

Full GMP-compliant validation of bone marrow-derived human CD133(+) cells as advanced therapy medicinal product for refractory ischemic cardiomyopathy.

Biomed Res Int 2015 1;2015:473159. Epub 2015 Oct 1.

Laboratory of Vascular Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Centro Cardiologico Monzino, IRCCS, Via Parea 4, 20138 Milan, Italy ; Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Festa del Perdono 7, 20122 Milan, Italy.

According to the European Medicine Agency (EMA) regulatory frameworks, Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP) represent a new category of drugs in which the active ingredient consists of cells, genes, or tissues. ATMP-CD133 has been widely investigated in controlled clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases, making CD133(+) cells one of the most well characterized cell-derived drugs in this field. To ensure high quality and safety standards for clinical use, the manufacturing process must be accomplished in certified facilities following standard operative procedures (SOPs). In the present work, we report the fully compliant GMP-grade production of ATMP-CD133 which aims to address the treatment of chronic refractory ischemic heart failure. Starting from bone marrow (BM), ATMP-CD133 manufacturing output yielded a median of 6.66 × 10(6) of CD133(+) cells (range 2.85 × 10(6)-30.84 × 10(6)), with a viability ranged between 96,03% and 99,97% (median 99,87%) and a median purity of CD133(+) cells of 90,60% (range 81,40%-96,20%). Based on these results we defined our final release criteria for ATMP-CD133: purity ≥ 70%, viability ≥ 80%, cellularity between 1 and 12 × 10(6) cells, sterile, and endotoxin-free. The abovementioned criteria are currently applied in our Phase I clinical trial (RECARDIO Trial).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/473159DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4606188PMC
August 2016

The washouts of discarded bone marrow collection bags and filters are a very abundant source of hMSCs.

Cytotherapy 2009 ;11(4):403-13

Laboratory of Cell Therapy G. Lanzani, USC Hematology, Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.

Background Aims: Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) are considered good candidates for a growing spectrum of cell therapies. We have validated a protocol that makes use of the washouts of discarded collection sets, left over at the end of the filtration of bone marrow (BM) explants performed for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation.

Methods: The method consists of direct plating of cells without density-gradient isolation followed by two detachment steps and expansion in 5% human platelet lysate (hPL).

Results: In a median of 26 days, 14 bags for adult patients and nine bags for pediatric patients for a standard dose of 1x10(6) hMSC/kg body weight could be prepared from the expansion of a fraction of the cells recovered from seven independent washouts. Moreover, 151 vials could be frozen from the remaining cells. The theoretical full expansion of all the frozen vials (validated by the expansion of two independent vials) could have allowed the production of 173 bags for adults and 348 bags for pediatric patients.

Conclusions: The washouts of discarded bags and filters left over at the end of routine BM explants filtration are a very abundant source of hMSC precursors that can be easily utilized for clinical applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14653240902960437DOI Listing
September 2009