Dr. Belson Rugwizangoga, MD, MMed - University of Rwanda - Senior Lecturer

Dr. Belson Rugwizangoga

MD, MMed

University of Rwanda

Senior Lecturer

Kigali | Rwanda

Main Specialties: Pathology-Anatomic & Clinical

Additional Specialties: Pathology

Dr. Belson Rugwizangoga, MD, MMed - University of Rwanda - Senior Lecturer

Dr. Belson Rugwizangoga

MD, MMed

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: University of Rwanda - Kigali , Rwanda

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Publications

20Publications

140Reads

8Profile Views

2PubMed Central Citations

Health Professional Training and Capacity Strengthening Through International Academic Partnerships: The First Five Years of the Human Resources for Health Program in Rwanda.

Int J Health Policy Manag 2018 11 1;7(11):1024-1039. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.15171/ijhpm.2018.61DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6326644PMC
November 2018
56 Reads

Training the Next Generation of African Pathologists.

Clin Lab Med 2018 03 29;38(1):37-51. Epub 2017 Dec 29.

Department of Pathology, Aga Khan University Hospital, 3(rd) Parklands Avenue, P.O.Box 30270, Post code 00100, Nairobi, Kenya.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cll.2017.10.004DOI Listing
March 2018
17 Reads
1.352 Impact Factor

Feasibility Study of Molecular Profiling of Gastric Cancer Specimens From Rwanda

Mary D. Chamberlin, Belson Rugwizangoga, Francine B. DeAbreu, Eric Rutaganda, Vincent Dusabejambo, Oswald Habyarimana, Steve Bensen, and Gregory J. Tsongalis. Feasibility Study of Molecular Profiling of Gastric Cancer Specimens From Rwanda. ​​International Congress on Pediatric Pulmonology; 22 - 25

Journal of Global Oncology

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April 2017
8 Reads

A single FFPE lysate preparation method for use with the Xpert Breast Cancer STRAT4 provides a streamlined solution for testing in developing countries

The Breast 32S1 (2017) S22–S77

The Breast

Background/Aims: The Xpert Breast Cancer STRAT4 assay makes robust quantitative measurements of ESR1, PGR, ERBB2, and MKi67 mRNAs from 4 μm FFPE tissue specimens in ∼75 minutes on a widely distributed, easy-to-use automated RT-qPCR diagnostic platform, GeneXpert (GX), making it suitable for the developing world. The current STRAT4 procedure recommends preparation of a standard (“1x”) or concentrated (“4x”) FFPE lysate depending on the tumor area (1x for ≥10 mm2; 4x for smaller tumors such as core biopsies) of the tissue section. This study aimed to evaluate a single protocol for testing samples of small and large tumor areas while maintaining a high overall concordance with IHC and a minimal rate of invalid/indeterminate results. Methods: FFPE tissue lysates from single 4 μm sections from 151 breast cancer blocks from Rwanda ranging in tumor area from 1 to 272 mm2 were prepared using both the 1x and 4x lysate procedures and tested with STRAT4. ER and HER2 IHC assays were performed on cut sections from the same blocks. Only HER2 IHC3+ values were considered positive. STRAT4 measurements for Ki67 were compared with mitotic rate as an alternative to Ki67 IHC. Results: Excellent overall (positive and negative) intra-assay agreement between the 1x and 4x lysates was observed for ESR at 98.0%, PGR at 97.2%, ERBB2 at 98.0%, and MKi67 at 95.8%. The invalid/ indeterminate rate with the standard 1x protocol was 2.6% for ESR, 7.9% for PGR, 2.6% for ERBB2, and 5.3% MKi67 while the rate with the 4x protocol was 0.7%, 4.0% 0.7% and 2.0%, respectively. Overall agreement with ER IHC was 91.2% with the 1x method and 92% with the 4x method. Overall agreement with HER2 IHC was 95.9% with the 1x method versus 97.3% with the 4x method. When comparing concordance to MKi67 mitotic rate, the 1x method had an overall concordance of 73.0% versus 75.5% with the 4x method. Conclusions: Utilizing the 4x lysate protocol for all samples regardless of tumor area provides a streamlined STRAT4 workflow for use in developing countries, while maintaining robust assay performance and minimizing invalid/indeterminate result rate.

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March 2017
11 Reads

Comparing the Gene Xpert Breast Cancer RUO mRNA Assay with ER and HER2 Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for Rapid Biomarker Analysis

Laboratory Investigation 2017;97(S1):60A-60A.

Laboratory Investigation

Background: Care of patients with breast cancer in the developing world is limited by access to quality ER and HER2 IHC diagnostic assays needed to justify therapeutics. Shipping pathology specimens to a central testing site delays therapy and incurs high costs. The GeneXpert Breast Cancer STRAT4 (Research Use Only/RUO) assay makes qualitativ measurements of ESR1, PGR, ERBB2, and MKi67 mRNAs from FFPE specimens in ~75 minutes on an automated RT-qPCR diagnostic platform, the GeneXpert (GX). Over 11,000 GX machines are in use in 182 countries, offering the possibility of near patient testing. We compared concordance between IHC and mRNA in breast tumors processed in Rwanda, with pathology review, GX, and IHC performed in the US. Design: Both mRNA and standard ER and HER2 IHC assays were performed on 150 breast cancer FFPE samples with assays tested as whole sections. For IHC 2+, a positive FISH result scored the sample as HER2+. GX measurements for Ki67 were compared with mitotic rate as an alternative to Ki67 IHC. Results: Valid IHC and STRAT4 results were available on 146 cases (90 cores, 56 excisions). Overall percent agreement was 93% for ER (51% +) and 97% for HER2 (27%+). 9/10 ER discrepancies were IHC ER+ and STRAT4 negative with 7/9 showing weak ER antibody staining (range 5-90%). 70% of ER discrepancies were in cores, of which 56% had small volume tumors ≤25mm2 (34% overall) and 89% ≤50mm2 (63% overall). 28/29 ER IHC- cases with a positive internal control (29/72) were appropriately identified as ER- by STRAT4. In 8/9 HER2 IHC2+ cases, STRAT4 correlated with FISH results, and excluding the IHC2+ cases, 2/3 discrepant HER2 were 1+ by IHC and STRAT4+; 1/3 was IHC+ and STRAT4-. Special subtype (lobular, mucinous, micropapillary) and low tumor cellularity (<50%) did not impact discordance. Comparing mitotic rate with MKi67 mRNA expression (8.2 mitoses/mm2 cut point) gave 100% sensitivity and NPV, but low specifi city (13.9%), and PPV (48%). Conclusions: In this evaluation of samples processed locally in Rwanda, concordance was good for ER and excellent for HER2. Low tumor volume and/or weak expression ofER accounted for most discrepancies. The GX Breast Cancer STRAT4 Assay provides an on-demand solution to the problem of obtaining accurate diagnostic results in low resource settings.

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February 2017
18 Reads

A MODEL FOR INTERNATIONAL MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAMS TO ADDRESS THE SARCOMA DISEASE BURDEN IN LOW- AND MIDDLE-INCOME SETTINGS

Theoneste Nkurunziza, Dayo Fadelu, Cyprien Shyirambere, Djamilla Uwimanzi, Raphael Kalengayi, Belson Rugwizangoga, Thierry Zawadi, Faustin Ntirenganya, Jennifer Kreshak. A model for international multidisciplinary teams to address the sarcoma disease burden in low- and middle-income settings. CTOS A

CTOS Annual Meeting

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November 2016
9 Reads

Accuracy of the Duration of Tissue Fixation and the Receptor Status Profile of Primary Breast Cancers in a Tertiary Hospital of Rwanda

Belson Rugwizangoga, Marie-Claire Ndayisaba, Isabelle-Annie Izimukwiye, Jean de Dieu Baryabagaya, Jean Bosco Surwumwe, Anne-Yvette Nsenguwera, Narcisse Niyikora, Vénérand Bigirimana. ​Accuracy of the Duration of Tissue Fixation and the Receptor Status Profile of Primary Breast Cancers in a Tertiary

​IJIR

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October 2016
5 Reads

Rhinosporidiosis: Report of four cases from the Eastern Province of Rwanda

Virchows Arch (2016) 469 (Suppl 1):S1–S346

Virchows Arch

Objective: Rhinosporidiosis is a tropical disease caused by Rhinosporidium seeberi. Originally described by Seeber in Argentina, the disease is primarily observed in India and Sri Lanka. There is only one brief report documenting the disease in humans previously in Rwanda (1993). The Anatomic Pathology Laboratory at the “Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Kigali (CHUK), a teaching hospital in Rwanda, started operating in October of 2013. We report four cases of rhinosporidiosis confirmed by histopathology. Method: We conducted a retrospective search for cases of Rhinosporidiosis in the anatomic pathology files of CHUK from 2013 to 2016. Slides were retrieved and the diagnosis was confirmed for all cases. PAS-D and MSS stains were performed in one case. Results: Four cases of Rhinosporidiosis were identified. Two cases were diagnosed in 2014, one in 2015, and one in 2016. All four patients were males. Their ages were 7, 12, 13 and 15. All presented with a history of nasal obstruction and had a nasal mass on exam. Of interest, three patients are from the same district (Gatsibo, Eastern Province) in Rwanda. Conclusion: We document four cases of Rhinosporidiosis from the Eastern Province, Rwanda; three within the same district. The clustering of cases suggests a probable reservoir in the area.

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September 2016
5 Reads

Accuracy of the duration of tissue formalin fixation and the molecular profiles of primary breast cancers in a tertiary hospital of Rwanda

Virchows Arch (2016) 469 (Suppl 1):S1–S346

Virchows Arch

Objective: Breast cancer (BC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in women in Rwanda. BCmolecular profile requires optimal tissue fixation duration; no corresponding study yet published in Rwanda. The aim is finding out effect of fixation duration on BC receptors in Rwanda for good clinical and laboratory practices. Method: Were included 45 BC cases diagnosed from 2013 to 2015 in a tertiary hospital in Rwanda. Optimal fixation duration was defined to be 24–48 h. Histological typing, grading, oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2/neu receptor status was evaluated through blind reviews. Data analysis used Stata 13.0. Two-tailed (P < 0.05) was considered significant. Ethical clearance was obtained from Hospital Ethics Committee. Results: Mean age was 51.9 (35–74) years. Tissue fixation duration was optimal in 24.4 %, [mean 141.8 (24–720) hours]. Histological types were ductal carcinoma (75.6 %), lobular carcinoma (13.3 %) and metaplastic carcinoma (4.5 %). Most cases were grade III (42.2 %). Molecular types were luminal A (45.2 %), luminal B (19.4 %), HER2+ (6.5 %) and triple negative (29.0 %). No significant association seen between age and BC molecular type; molecular type and adequacy of fixation or between molecular type and histological type. Conclusion: Larger studies are recommended to determine the optimal fixation duration for consistent BC molecular profile.

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September 2016
8 Reads

Ovarian squamous cell carcinoma arising from mature cystic teratoma in a young patient

J Cases Obstet Gynecol, 2016;3(1):1-3

J Cases Obstet Gynecol

Squamous cell carcinoma arising from ovarian mature cystic teratoma (MCT) is very rare. We report a case of a 21-year-old female who presented with a 7-month history of abdominal mass increasing in size with time. Imaging findings were suggestive of bilateral ovarian teratoma. Intraoperative findings were cystic masses in both ovaries and a solid multinodular left mesenteric mass. On gross examination, there were cysts filled with gelatinous material and hairs, while the mesenteric mass consisted of matted lymph nodes. Histology revealed a MCT with multifocal areas of invasive squamous cell carcinoma, in all three masses. While squamous cell carcinoma in MCT is very rare, this is a unique case reported in a so young patient. The younger age could not be a factor preluding malignancy in MCT.

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January 2016
7 Reads

Cytological Pattern of Lymphadenopathies in a Referral Hospital of Rwanda: Experience of Kigali University Teaching Hospital

A Nzitakera, V Bigirimana, AK Mbugua, JM Muthami, B Rugwizangoga, AP Twizerimana. Cytological pattern of lymphadenopathies in a referral hospital of Rwanda: experience of Kigali university teaching hospital. East African Medical Journal 2015;92(2):81-84. ISSN: 0012 835x

East African Medical Journal

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February 2015
5 Reads

A Combination Of Ki67 Expression And Gleason Score For Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Offers Better Prognostic Information Than Either Alone

B Rugwizangoga, E Vuhahula, J Kitinya. A Combination Of Ki67 Expression And Gleason Score For Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Offers Better Prognostic Information Than Either Alone. The Internet Journal of Urology 2014;12(1).

The Internet Journal of Urology

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April 2014
6 Reads

Pericardial cyst with right ventricular compression.

Pan Afr Med J 2012 3;12:60. Epub 2012 Jul 3.

Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428180PMC
December 2012
3 Reads
1 Citation

Coats’ disease in Tanzania: first case report and literature review

Rugwizangoga B, Mwabili TW, Scanlan T, Meyer P, Kitinya J. Coats’ disease in Tanzania: first case report and literature review. IAP 2012 International Congress. Cape Town: Histopathology; 2012. p. 184

Histopathology

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September 2012
4 Reads

Top co-authors

Iacopo Baussano
Iacopo Baussano

Imperial College London

2
Felix Sayinzoga
Felix Sayinzoga

Rwanda Biomedical Center

2
Gary M Clifford
Gary M Clifford

University of Surrey

2
Silvia Franceschi
Silvia Franceschi

International Agency for Research on Cancer

2
Vanessa Tenet
Vanessa Tenet

Tata Memorial Hospital & Cancer Research Institute

2
Marcel E Durieux
Marcel E Durieux

University of Virginia

1
Beth Barrows
Beth Barrows

University of Maryland School of Nursing

1