Publications by authors named "Belinda W Nelson"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Impact of Goal Setting and Goal Attainment Methods on Asthma Outcomes.

Health Educ Behav 2017 02 9;44(1):103-112. Epub 2016 Jul 9.

1 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Optimal use of goal-setting strategies in self-management efforts with high-risk individuals with asthma is not well understood. This study aimed to describe factors associated with goal attainment in an asthma self-management intervention for African American women with asthma and determine whether goal attainment methods proved beneficial to goal achievement and improved asthma outcomes. Data came from 212 African American women in the intervention arm of a randomized clinical trial evaluating a telephone-based asthma self-management program. Telephone interview data were collected to assess goals and goal attainment methods identified, asthma symptoms, asthma control, and asthma-related quality of life at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess the long-term impact of goal setting and goal attainment methods on outcomes. The average age of the sample was 42.1 years ( SD = 14.8). Factors associated with goal attainment included higher education ( p < .01) and fewer depressive symptoms ( p < .01). Using a goal attainment method also resulted in more goals being achieved over the course of the intervention (Estimate [ SE] = 1.25 [0.18]; p < .001) when adjusted for clinical and demographic factors. Use of and types of goal attainment methods and goals were not found to significantly affect asthma control, quality of life, or frequency of nighttime asthma symptoms at follow-up. Using a method to achieve goals led to greater goal attainment. Goal attainment alone did not translate into improved asthma outcomes in our study sample. Further studies are warranted to assess the challenges of self-management in chronic disease patients with complex health needs and how goal setting and goal attainment methods can be strategically integrated into self-management efforts to improve health endpoints.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1090198116637858DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6004531PMC
February 2017

Program Implementation Approaches to Build and Sustain Health Care Coordination for Type 2 Diabetes.

Health Promot Pract 2017 03 9;18(2):306-313. Epub 2016 Jul 9.

1 RTI International's Center for Communication Science, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.

Background: As more people enter the U.S. health care system under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), it is increasingly critical to deliver coordinated, high-quality health care. The ACA supports implementation and sustainability of efficient health care models, given expected limits in available resources. This article highlights implementation strategies to build and sustain care coordination, particularly ones consistent with and reinforced by the ACA. It focuses on disease self-management programs to improve the health of patients with type 2 diabetes, exemplified by grantees of the Alliance to Reduce Disparities in Diabetes.

Method: We conducted interviews with grantee program representatives throughout their 5-year programs and conducted a qualitative framework analysis of data to identify key themes related to care coordination.

Results: The most promising care coordination strategies that grantee programs described included establishing clinic-community collaborations, embedding community health workers within care management teams, and sharing electronic data. Establishing provider buy-in was crucial for these strategies to be effective.

Discussion: This article adds new insights into strategies promoting effective care coordination. The strategies that grantees implemented throughout the program align with ACA requirements, underscoring their relevance to the changing U.S. health care environment and the likelihood of further support for program sustainability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1524839916643705DOI Listing
March 2017

Engaging faith-based resources to initiate and support diabetes self-management among African Americans: a collaboration of informal and formal systems of care.

Health Promot Pract 2014 Nov;15(2 Suppl):71S-82S

University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA Comprehensive Diabetes and Metabolic Center of Excellence, Memphis, TN, USA.

Diabetes for Life (DFL), a project of Memphis Healthy Churches (MHC) and Common Table Health Alliance (CTHA; formerly Healthy Memphis Common Table [HMCT]), is a self-management program aimed at reducing health disparities among African Americans with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee. This program is one of five national projects that constitute The Alliance to Reduce Disparities in Diabetes, a 5-year grant-funded initiative of The Merck Foundation. Our purpose is to describe the faith-based strategies supporting DFL made possible by linking with an established informal health system, MHC, created by Baptist Memorial Health Care. The MHC network engaged volunteer Church Health Representatives as educators and recruiters for DFL. The components of the DFL project and the effect on chronic disease management for the participants will be described. The stages of DFL recruitment and implementation from an open-access to a closed model involving six primary care practices created a formal health system. The involvement of CTHA, a regional health collaborative, created the opportunity for DFL to expand the pool of health care providers and then recognize the core of providers most engaged with DFL patients. This collaboration between MHC and HMCT led to the organization of the formal health network.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1524839914543012DOI Listing
November 2014

Alliance system and policy change: necessary ingredients for improvement in diabetes care and reduction of disparities.

Health Promot Pract 2014 Nov;15(2 Suppl):11S-22S

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Reducing diabetes inequities requires system and policy changes based on real-life experiences of vulnerable individuals living with the condition. While introducing innovative interventions for African American, Native American, and Latino low-income people, the five community-based sites of the Alliance to Reduce Disparities in Diabetes recognized that policy changes were essential to sustain their efforts. Data regarding change efforts were collected from site leaders and examined against documents provided routinely to the National Program Office at the University of Michigan. A policy expert refined the original lists to include only confirmed policy changes, scope of change (organizational to national), and stage of accomplishment (1, beginning; 2, adoption; 3, implementation; and 4, full maintenance). Changes were again verified through site visits and telephone interviews. In 3 years, Alliance teams achieved 53 system and policy change accomplishments. Efforts were implemented at the organizational (33), citywide (13), state (5), and national (2) levels, and forces helping and hindering success were identified. Three types of changes were deemed especially significant for diabetes control: data sharing across care-providing organizations, embedding community health workers into the clinical care team, and linking clinic services with community assets and resources in support of self-management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1524839914543829DOI Listing
November 2014

Beyond co-pays and out-of-pocket costs: perceptions of health-related financial burden in managing asthma among African American women.

J Asthma 2014 Dec 4;51(10):1083-8. Epub 2014 Jul 4.

Department of Health Behavior & Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health , Ann Arbor, MI , USA and.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to define perceptions of health-related financial burden based on the views of individuals who report these perceptions through qualitative approaches.

Methods: Four focus groups were conducted in Southeast Michigan with 26 African American women with asthma, recruited based on maximum variation sampling procedures. A semi-structured interview was employed by facilitators. Coded transcripts were analyzed for themes regarding dimensions of the meaning of financial burden.

Results: Major domains of financial burden identified included (1) high out-of-pocket expenses; (2) lost wages from exacerbations, inability to maintain a stable job and stress from making decisions about taking a sick day or coming to work; (3) transport costs; (4) both costs and stress of managing insurance eligibility and correcting erroneous bills.

Conclusion: Greater awareness of factors that add to perceptions of financial burden might better equip researchers to develop interventions to help care teams manage such concerns with their patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02770903.2014.936453DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6004530PMC
December 2014

Self-management of multiple chronic conditions among African American women with asthma: a qualitative study.

J Asthma 2014 Apr 22;51(3):243-52. Epub 2013 Nov 22.

Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, Center for Managing Chronic Disease .

Objective: African American women are disproportionately burdened by asthma morbidity and mortality and may be more likely than asthma patients in general to have comorbid health conditions. This study sought to identify the self-management challenges faced by African American women with asthma and comorbidities, how they prioritize their conditions and behaviors perceived as beneficial across conditions.

Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 25 African-American women (mean age 52 years) with persistent asthma and at least one of the following: diabetes, heart disease or arthritis. Information was elicited on women's experiences managing asthma and concurrent health conditions. The constant-comparison analytic method was used to develop and apply a coding scheme to interview transcripts. Key themes and subthemes were identified.

Results: Participants reported an average of 5.7 comorbidities. Fewer than half of the sample considered asthma their main health problem; these perceptions were influenced by beliefs about the relative controllability, predictability and severity of their health conditions. Participants reported ways in which comorbidities affected asthma management, including that asthma sometimes took a "backseat" to conditions considered more troublesome or worrisome. Mood problems, sometimes attributed to pain or functional limitations resulting from comorbidities, reduced motivation for self-management. Women described how asthma affected comorbidity management; e.g. by impeding recommended exercise. Some self-management recommendations, such as physical activity and weight control, were seen as beneficial across conditions.

Conclusions: Multiple chronic conditions that include asthma may interact to complicate self-management of each condition. Additional clinical attention and self-management support may help to reduce multimorbidity-related challenges.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02770903.2013.860166DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4234073PMC
April 2014

Consideration of shared decision making in nursing: a review of clinicians' perceptions and interventions.

Open Nurs J 2009 Oct 2;3:65-75. Epub 2009 Oct 2.

Center for Managing Chronic Disease, University of Michigan, 109 Observatory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA.

As the number of individuals with chronic illness increases so has the need for strategies to enable nurses to engage them effectively in daily management of their conditions. Shared decision making between patients and nurses is one approach frequently discussed in the literature. This paper reviews recent studies of shared decision making and the meaning of findings for the nurse-patient relationship. Patients likely to prefer to engage in shared decision making are younger and have higher levels of education. However, there is a lack of evidence for the effect of shared decision making on patient outcomes. Further, studies are needed to examine shared decision making when the patient is a child. Nurses are professionally suited to engage their patients fully in treatment plans. More evidence for how shared decision making affects outcomes and how nurses can successfully achieve such engagement is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874434600903010065DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2765030PMC
October 2009

Working with a Head Start population with asthma: lessons learned.

J Sch Health 2006 Aug;76(6):273-5

University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1420 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA.

The Early Childhood Asthma Project involved asthma case identification in 35 Head Start centers in Detroit, MI, and attempted implementation of an intervention designed to help families manage a child's asthma more effectively. Surveys were distributed to the parents of all Head Start children (3408), and 2198 complete surveys were returned. Case detection found probable asthma in 30% of the children whose parent returned a sufficiently complete survey. Implementation of the intervention was unsuccessful in this setting. Obstacles to effective implementation included the sample's low participation and high attrition, limited involvement of Head Start personnel, factors related to the program approach, and the target population's beliefs about asthma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1746-1561.2006.00111.xDOI Listing
August 2006
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