Publications by authors named "Belinda Setters"

5 Publications

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Delirium.

Prim Care 2017 Sep;44(3):541-559

GRECC, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, Malcom Randall VAMC, University of Florida College of Medicine, 2004 Mowry Road, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.

Delirium is a common, often underdiagnosed, geriatric syndrome characterized by an acute change in attention and consciousness. As a neuropsychiatric disorder with an underlying organic cause, delirium has been considered a diagnosis reserved for the hospital setting. However, delirium is known to occur as both an acute and subacute condition that carries significant morbidity and mortality. Combined with its association with dementia and aging, this makes delirium an important topic for primary care providers to become more familiar with as they are tasked with caring for an aging population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pop.2017.04.010DOI Listing
September 2017

Hypertension in the Older Adult.

Prim Care 2017 Sep;44(3):529-539

Geriatric & Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Houston McGovern Medical School, 6431 Fannin, MBS 5.111, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

Hypertension is common among adults and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and should be routinely addressed in primary care practice. Optimal blood pressure targets have evolved in the past decade with the release of large studies including older persons. However, controversy remains regarding the treatment of older and frail patients. The relationship between blood pressure treatment and falls or cognitive impairment is still an area of concern and debate. A strategy to address hypertension in older persons should consider an individual's fitness and the likelihood of adverse effects and worsening of conditions that adversely affect quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pop.2017.05.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5776734PMC
September 2017

National Sleep Foundation's updated sleep duration recommendations: final report.

Sleep Health 2015 Dec 31;1(4):233-243. Epub 2015 Oct 31.

Division of Sleep Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA.

Objective: To make scientifically sound and practical recommendations for daily sleep duration across the life span.

Methods: The National Sleep Foundation convened a multidisciplinary expert panel (Panel) with broad representation from leading stakeholder organizations. The Panel evaluated the latest scientific evidence and participated in a formal consensus and voting process. Then, the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to formulate sleep duration recommendations.

Results: The Panel made sleep duration recommendations for 9 age groups. Sleep duration ranges, expressed as hours of sleep per day, were designated as recommended, may be appropriate, or not recommended. Recommended sleep durations are as follows: 14-17 hours for newborns, 12-15 hours for infants, 11-14 hours for toddlers, 10-13 hours for preschoolers, 9-11 hours for school-aged children, and 8-10 hours for teenagers. Seven to 9 hours is recommended for young adults and adults, and 7-8 hours of sleep is recommended for older adults. The self-designated basis for duration selection and critical discussions are also provided.

Conclusions: Consensus for sleep duration recommendations was reached for specific age groupings. Consensus using a multidisciplinary expert Panel lends robust credibility to the results. Finally, limitations and caveats of these recommendations are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2015.10.004DOI Listing
December 2015

National Sleep Foundation's sleep time duration recommendations: methodology and results summary.

Sleep Health 2015 Mar 8;1(1):40-43. Epub 2015 Jan 8.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

Objective: The objective was to conduct a scientifically rigorous update to the National Sleep Foundation's sleep duration recommendations.

Methods: The National Sleep Foundation convened an 18-member multidisciplinary expert panel, representing 12 stakeholder organizations, to evaluate scientific literature concerning sleep duration recommendations. We determined expert recommendations for sufficient sleep durations across the lifespan using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method.

Results: The panel agreed that, for healthy individuals with normal sleep, the appropriate sleep duration for newborns is between 14 and 17 hours, infants between 12 and 15 hours, toddlers between 11 and 14 hours, preschoolers between 10 and 13 hours, and school-aged children between 9 and 11 hours. For teenagers, 8 to 10 hours was considered appropriate, 7 to 9 hours for young adults and adults, and 7 to 8 hours of sleep for older adults.

Conclusions: Sufficient sleep duration requirements vary across the lifespan and from person to person. The recommendations reported here represent guidelines for healthy individuals and those not suffering from a sleep disorder. Sleep durations outside the recommended range may be appropriate, but deviating far from the normal range is rare. Individuals who habitually sleep outside the normal range may be exhibiting signs or symptoms of serious health problems or, if done volitionally, may be compromising their health and well-being.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2014.12.010DOI Listing
March 2015