Publications by authors named "Bei-Bei Wu"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Mucinous borderline ovarian tumors with and without Intraepithelial Carcinoma: Differences in clinicopathologic features and fertility results.

J Obstet Gynaecol Res 2020 Apr 11;46(4):646-653. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

Department of Gynecological Oncology, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Aim: To investigate the clinicopathologic characteristic and fertility results of patients with mucinous borderline ovarian tumors (MBOTs), and the effects of intraepithelial carcinoma (IECA) on them.

Methods: Fifty-two patients treated for MBOTs with or without IECA were retrospectively analyzed.

Results: Patients with IECA were more frequently observed at stage Ic (3/12 vs 1/40, P = 0.034) and accompanied by microinvasive carcinoma (3/12 vs 1/40, P = 0.034). The detected rate of IECA by intraoperative frozen section (5/12, 41.7%) was much lower than that of MBOTs (82.5%, P = 0.010). About 61.5% patients in our study underwent fertility-sparing surgery. Follow-up information was retained completely in 41 patients. And all four tumor recurrences were observed (9.8%) in conservative surgery group in 66 months, though there was no statistical association (P = 0.280). There were three patients who recurred more than once, even one occurred tumor-related death. Only one recurrent patient was in IECA group (P > 0.05). However, patients with IECA were more likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy (3 of 12 vs 0 of 40, P = 0.010) and surgical staging (75% vs 52.5%, P = 0.200). As for fertility results, nine patients wished to be pregnant and seven of them (77.8%) were successful.

Conclusion: For young patients with MBOTs, fertility results are satisfactory after conservative surgery. But patients should be fully informed about the relative high recurrent rate. And IECA has no statistical negative effects on MBOTs till now, but a long-term follow-up is required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jog.14210DOI Listing
April 2020

Impaired decision-making and functional neuronal network activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

J Magn Reson Imaging 2018 12 14;48(6):1508-1517. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China.

Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with cognitive deficit but the exact neural mechanisms remain unclear.

Purpose: To explore sequential brain activities using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the performance of a decision-making task, and to determine whether serum or clinical markers can reflect the involvement of the brain in SLE.

Subjects: Sixteen female SLE patients without overt clinical neuropsychiatric symptoms and 16 healthy controls were included.

Field Strength/sequence: 1.5T, T -weighted anatomic images, gradient-echo echo-planar imaging sequence, and 3D images.

Assessment: The computer-based Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) for assessing decision-making was performed by SLE patients and 16 matched controls; brain activity was recorded via blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI. The amplitudes of the average BOLD responses were calculated for each individual subject, and activation data from fMRI experiments were compared between the two groups.

Statistical Tests: Two-sample t-test; repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA); linear regression analyses.

Results: Imaging revealed activity in a distributed network of brain regions in both groups, including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and the striatum, as well as the insular, parietal, and occipital cortices. Compared to controls, SLE patients showed lower activation in a convergence zone and the limbic system, namely, the OFC, vmPFC, ACC, and PCC, but greater activation in memory, emotion, and behavior systems involving the dlPFC, the insular cortex and the striatum. Furthermore, brain activation in the vmPFC was positively correlated with IGT scores (r = 0.63, P < 0.001), but inversely related to disease activity (r = -0.57, P < 0.01).

Data Conclusion: The dynamics among the aforementioned neural systems (some hyperfunctioning, others hypofunctioning) may shed some light on the pathologic mechanisms underlying SLE without overt clinical neuropsychiatric symptoms. In addition, disease activity may potentially be used as an effective biomarker reflecting cerebral involvement in SLE.

Level Of Evidence: 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;48:1508-1517.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.26006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282848PMC
December 2018

Activating adenosine A1 receptor accelerates PC12 cell injury via ADORA1/PKC/KATP pathway after intermittent hypoxia exposure.

Mol Cell Biochem 2018 Sep 29;446(1-2):161-170. Epub 2018 Jan 29.

Department of Pediatrics, The Second Affiliated Hospital and Yuying Children's Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, The Second School of Medicine, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 325027, China.

Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is associated with the neurocognitive deficits as a result of the neuronal cell injury. Previous studies have shown that adenosine A1 receptor (ADORA1) played an important role against hypoxia exposure, such as controlling the metabolic recovery in rat hippocampal slices and increasing the resistance in the combined effects of hypoxia and hypercapnia. However, little is known about whether ADORA1 takes part in the course of neuronal cell injury after intermittent hypoxia exposure which was the main pathological characteristic of OSAHS. The present study is performed to explore the underlying mechanism of neuronal cell injury which was induced by intermittent hypoxia exposure in PC12 cells. In our research, we find that the stimulation of the ADORA1 by CCPA accelerated the injury of PC12 cells as well as upregulated the expression of PKC, inwardly rectifying potassium channel 6.2(Kir6.2) and sulfonylurea receptor 1(SUR1) while inhibition of the ADORA1 by DPCPX alleviated the injury of PC12 cells as well as downregulated the expression of PKC, Kir6.2, and SUR1. Moreover, inhibition of the PKC by CHE, also mitigated the injury of PC12 cells, suppressed the Kir6.2 and SUR1 expressions induced by PKC. Taken together, our findings indicate that ADORA1 accelerated PC12 cells injury after intermittent hypoxia exposure via ADORA1/PKC/K signaling pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11010-018-3283-2DOI Listing
September 2018

Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of pyrazinamide resistance among multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Zhejiang, China.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2015 Mar 12;59(3):1690-5. Epub 2015 Jan 12.

Zhejiang Prevention and Treatment Center of Tuberculosis, Zhejiang TCM & WM Hospital, Hangzhou, China

To explore the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of pyrazinamide (PZA) resistance among multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) isolates in Zhejiang province, a total of 274 MDR-TB isolates were collected. Drug susceptibility testing and spoligotyping were performed on all clinical isolates. In addition, the mutated features of PZA-resistant loci, including pncA and rpsA, were also analyzed by DNA sequencing. Our results showed that the prevalence of PZA resistance among MDR-TB strains in Zhejiang province was 43.07% and that PZA resistance was associated with concomitant resistance to streptomycin. The majority of PZA-resistant MDR-TB isolates belonged to the Beijing family. Mutations within pncA, not rpsA, constituted the primary mechanism of PZA resistance. Among 118 PZA-resistant isolates, 53 different mutations were observed in pncA, and most of them were point mutations. Compared with the phenotypic data, DNA sequencing of pncA has sensitivity and specificity of 77.97% and 96.79%, respectively. Analysis of pncA provided a robust tool for rapid detection of PZA drug resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.04541-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4325781PMC
March 2015

A novel mechanism for endogenous formaldehyde elevation in SAMP8 mouse.

J Alzheimers Dis 2014 ;40(4):1039-53

State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, affecting millions of people worldwide. Increasing evidence suggests that formaldehyde might be one of the various pathological mechanisms involved in the process of AD onset. Here, we use an AD mouse model, senescence accelerated mouse-prone 8 strain (SAMP8), to study the relationship between endogenous formaldehyde and impairment of cognition. The Morris water maze test was used to evaluate the spatial learning and memory ability of 3-month-old SAMP8 mice, and we correlated the results with endogenous formaldehyde concentrations in the brain. To investigate the underlying reasons for formaldehyde elevation in neurodegenerative diseases, the expression levels of enzymes involved in formaldehyde metabolism were analyzed, including (anabolic) semicarbazide sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) and (catabolic) alcohol dehydrogenase III (ADH3). When compared with age-matched SAMR1 mice, we found that in 3-month-old SAMP8 mice the capacity for spatial learning and memory was lower, while brain formaldehyde levels were higher. By using real-time PCR, western blotting, enzyme assay, and immunohistochemistry techniques, we discovered that SSAO expression levels were increased, whereas ADH3 exhibited reduced expression levels of mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity. The imbalance of these metabolic enzymes may represent a causal explanation for the observed formaldehyde elevation in the SAMP8 brain. Such increase could be responsible for the observed tau hyperphosphorylation assumed to result in protein aggregation, ultimately leading to cognitive impairment. Taken together, our study gives new insights into the role of metabolic enzymes in age-related accumulation of formaldehyde, and thus the establishment of neurodegenerative diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-131595DOI Listing
January 2015

Loss of E protein transcription factors E2A and HEB delays memory-precursor formation during the CD8+ T-cell immune response.

Eur J Immunol 2012 Aug;42(8):2031-41

Division of Biology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.

The transcription factors E2A and HEB (members of the E protein family) have been shown to play essential roles in lymphocyte development, while their negative regulators, the Id proteins, have been implicated in both lymphocyte development and in the CD8(+) T-cell immune response. Here, we show that E proteins also influence CD8(+) T cells responding to infection. E protein expression was upregulated by CD8(+) T cells during the early stages of infection and increased E protein DNA-binding activity could be detected upon TCR stimulation. Deficiency in the E proteins, E2A and HEB, led to increased frequency of terminally differentiated effector KLRG1(hi) CD8(+) T cells in mice during infection, and decreased generation of longer-lived memory-precursor cells during the immune response. These data suggest a model whereby E protein transcription factor activity favors rapid memory-precursor T-cell formation while their negative regulators, Id2 and Id3, are both required for robust effector CD8(+) T-cell response during infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.201242497DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3702188PMC
August 2012

Transcriptional regulator Id2 mediates CD8+ T cell immunity.

Nat Immunol 2006 Dec 5;7(12):1317-25. Epub 2006 Nov 5.

Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.

Transcriptional programs that initiate and sustain the proliferation, differentiation and survival of CD8(+) T cells during immune responses are not completely understood. Here we show that inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2), an antagonist of E protein transcription factors, was upregulated in CD8(+) T cells during infection and that expression of Id2 was maintained in memory CD8(+) T cells. Although Id2-deficient naive CD8(+) T cells recognized antigen and proliferated normally early after infection, effector CD8(+) T cells did not accumulate because the cells were highly susceptible to apoptosis. Id2-deficient CD8(+) T cells responding to infection had changes in the expression of genes that influence survival and had altered memory formation. Our data emphasize the importance of Id2 in regulating gene expression by CD8(+) T cells and the magnitude of effector responses, suggesting a mechanism involving Id protein- and E protein-mediated survival and differentiation of mature T cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ni1403DOI Listing
December 2006

Tilmicosin and tylosin have anti-inflammatory properties via modulation of COX-2 and iNOS gene expression and production of cytokines in LPS-induced macrophages and monocytes.

Int J Antimicrob Agents 2006 May;27(5):431-8

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094, China.

Macrolides have been reported to modify the host immune and inflammatory responses both in vivo and in vitro. We examined the in vitro effect of the macrolides tilmicosin and tylosin, which are only used in the veterinary clinic, on the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and cytokines by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and mouse peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Compared with 5 microg/mL, tilmicosin and tylosin concentrations of 10 microg/mL and 20 microg/mL significantly decreased the production of 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha) (6-keto-PGF(1alpha)), PGE(2), NO, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6, and increased IL-10 production. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression were also significantly reduced. These results support the opinion that macrolides may exert an anti-inflammatory effect through modulating the synthesis of several mediators and cytokines involved in the inflammatory process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2005.12.010DOI Listing
May 2006
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