Publications by authors named "Beate Mitulla"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

New mutations of EXT1 and EXT2 genes in German patients with Multiple Osteochondromas.

Ann Hum Genet 2009 May 25;73(Pt 3):283-91. Epub 2009 Mar 25.

Institute of Human Genetics, Medical Faculty at the University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Mutations in either the EXT1 or EXT2 genes lead to Multiple Osteochondromas (MO), an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder. This is a report on clinical findings and results of molecular analyses of both genes in 23 German patients affected by MO. Mutation screening was performed by using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and automated sequencing. In 17 of 23 patients novel pathogenic mutations have been identified; eleven in the EXT1 and six in the EXT2 gene. Five patients were carriers of recurrent mutations in the EXT2 gene (p.Asp227Asn, p.Gln172X, p.Gln258X) and one patient had no detectable mutation. To demonstrate their pathogenic effect on transcription, two complex mutations in EXT1 and EXT2 and three splice site mutations were characterized by mRNA investigations. The results obtained provide evidence for different aberrant splice effects - usage of new cryptic splice sites and exon skipping. Our study extends the mutational spectrum and understanding of pathogenic effects of mutations in EXT1 and EXT2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-1809.2009.00508.xDOI Listing
May 2009

Oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS): clinical evaluation and severity scoring of 53 patients and proposal for a new classification.

Eur J Med Genet 2005 Oct-Dec;48(4):397-411. Epub 2005 Jun 8.

Institut für Humangenetik, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen, Germany.

Oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OMIM164210) is a phenotypically and probably also a genetically heterogeneous disorder, characterized by anomalies of the ear (mostly microtia), hemifacial microsomia, and defects of the vertebral column. Associated clinical findings include anomalies of the eye and brain, and developmental delay. We have evaluated the clinical data and photographs of 53 unrelated patients with OAVS, all presenting with either isolated microtia or preauricular tags in association with hemifacial microsomia as minimal diagnostic criteria; five had a positive family history for OAVS. Based on the main clinical findings and unilateral or bilateral involvement, we have developed a new classification system for OAVS, consisting of six subgroups. There is a statistically significant correlation between the subgroup and number of associated clinical findings, and a statistically significant difference regarding prognosis in uni- and bilaterally affected patients, suggesting that this classification is clinically relevant to the categorization of patients with OAVS. The newly developed scoring system (two points for each main clinical finding and one for each associated clinical finding) presented here, also aids prognosis, especially for delay of motor development and brain anomalies, and statistical analysis revealed significant clustering between different clinical findings of OAVS confirming the clinical impression previously published by several authors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2005.04.015DOI Listing
February 2006

Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome: fourteen new patients and a clinical analysis.

Am J Med Genet A 2005 Jun;135(3):251-62

Institut für Medizinische Genetik, Universitätsklinikum Charité, Berlin, Germany.

The Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) is a disorder of unknown cause comprising craniosynostosis, a marfanoid habitus and skeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, and connective-tissue anomalies. There are no pathognomonic signs of SGS and diagnosis depends on recognition of a characteristic combination of anomalies. Here, we describe 14 persons with SGS and compare their clinical findings with those of 23 previously reported individuals, including two families with more than one affected individual. Our analysis suggests that there is a characteristic facial appearance, with more than two thirds of all individuals having hypertelorism, down-slanting palpebral fissures, a high-arched palate, micrognathia, and apparently low-set and posteriorly rotated ears. Other commonly reported manifestations include hypotonia in at least the neonatal period, developmental delay, and inguinal or umbilical hernia. The degree of reported intellectual impairment ranges from mild to severe. The most common skeletal manifestations in SGS were arachnodactyly, pectus deformity, camptodactyly, scoliosis, and joint hypermobility. None of the skeletal signs alone is specific for SGS. Our study includes 14 mainly German individuals with SGS evaluated over a period of 10 years. Given that only 23 other persons with SGS have been reported to date worldwide, we suggest that SGS may be more common than previously assumed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.30431DOI Listing
June 2005

Subtelomere FISH in 50 children with mental retardation and minor anomalies, identified by a checklist, detects 10 rearrangements including a de novo balanced translocation of chromosomes 17p13.3 and 20q13.33.

Am J Med Genet A 2004 Aug;128A(4):364-73

Institute of Clinical Genetics, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden, Germany.

Submicroscopic or subtle aneusomies at the chromosome ends, typically diagnosed by subtelomere fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), are a significant cause of idiopathic mental retardation (MR). Some 20 subtelomere studies, including more than 2,500 subjects, have been reported. The studies are not directly comparable because different techniques and patient ascertainment criteria were used, but an analysis of 14 studies showed that aberrations were detected in 97 out of 1,718 patients (5.8%, range 2-29%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.60-6.84%). We performed a subtelomere FISH study of 50 unrelated children ascertained by a checklist that evaluates MR or developmental delay, dysmorphism, growth defect, and abnormal pedigree and found 10 bona fide causal rearrangements (detection rate 20%, 95% CI 10-33.7%). The findings included five unbalanced familial translocations or inversions, two unbalanced de novo translocations, and two de novo deletions. Patient 5 showed multiple anomalies (large head, vision defect, omphalocele, heart defect, enlarged kidneys, moderate MR, speech defect, mild transient homocysteinemia) and a de novo balanced translocation of chromosomes 17p13.3 and 20q13.33. The report of a subtelomeric balanced rearrangement associated with a disease phenotype is a novel one. FISH mapping using panels of overlapping BAC clones identified a number of candidate genes at or near his breakpoints, including ASPA, TRPV3, TRPV1, and CTNS at 17p13.3, and three genes of unknown function at 20q13.33. Only the homocysteinemia could be speculatively linked to one of these genes (CTNS, the gene for cystinosis). Three within the subset of 16 children (18.8%) with mild (IQ, 50-69) or unspecified degree of MR tested positive, suggesting that the checklist approach could be especially useful within this group of patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.30160DOI Listing
August 2004

Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs): genotype-phenotype correlation and classification.

Hum Genet 2003 Dec 16;114(1):51-67. Epub 2003 Sep 16.

Institut für Humangenetik und Anthropologie, Kollegiengasse 10, 07743 Jena, Germany.

Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs) are present in about 0.05% of the human population. In approximately 30% of SMC carriers (excluding the approximately 60% SMC derived from one of the acrocentric chromosomes), an abnormal phenotype is observed. The clinical outcome of an SMC is difficult to predict as they can have different phenotypic consequences because of (1). differences in euchromatic DNA-content, (2). different degrees of mosaicism, and/or (3). uniparental disomy (UPD) of the chromosomes homologous to the SMC. Here, we present 35 SMCs, which are derived from all human chromosomes, apart from chromosome 6, as demonstrated by the appropriate molecular cytogenetic approaches, such as centromere-specific multicolor fluoresence in situ hybridization (cenM-FISH), multicolor banding (MCB), and subcentromere-specific multicolor FISH (subcenM-FISH). In nine cases without an aberrant phenotype, neither partial proximal trisomies nor UPD could be detected. Abnormal clinical findings, such as psychomotoric retardation and/or craniofacial dysmorphisms, were associated with seven of the cases in which subcentromeric single-copy probes were proven to be present in three copies. Conversely, in eight cases with a normal phenotype, proximal euchromatic material was detected as partial trisomy. UPD was studied in 12 cases and subsequently detected in two of the cases with SMC (partial UPD 4p and maternal UPD 22 in a der(22)-syndrome patient), indicating that SMC carriers have an enhanced risk for UPD. At present, small proximal trisomies of 1p, 1q, 2p, 6p, 6q, 7q, 9p, and 12q seem to lead to clinical manifestations, whereas partial proximal trisomies of 2q, 3p, 3q, 5q, 7p, 8p, 17p, and 18p may not be associated with significant clinical symptoms. With respect to clinical outcome, a classification of SMCs is proposed that considers molecular genetic and molecular cytogenetic characteristics as demonstrated by presently available methods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-003-1016-3DOI Listing
December 2003

First patient with trisomy 21 accompanied by an additional der(4)(:p11 --> q11:) plus partial uniparental disomy 4p15-16.

Am J Med Genet A 2003 Jan;116A(1):26-30

Institute of Human Genetics and Anthropology, Jena, Germany.

We report on a rare additional numerical chromosomal aberration in a child with Down syndrome due to free trisomy 21. The karyotype showed 48,XY,+21,+mar after GTG banding, with the marker present in 80% of cells. The supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC) was as small as approximately one-third of 18p, and with the recently developed centromere-specific multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (cenM-FISH) technique, it was shown that the SMC was a derivative chromosome 4. The SMC was not specifically stained by arm-specific probes for chromosome 4; thus, it has been described as der(4)(:p11 --> q11:). Microsatellite analysis resulted in a partial maternal uniparental isodisomy (UPD) for chromosome 4p15-16 and a maternal origin for two chromosomes 21. Until now only two similar cases have been described in the literature, but without clarifying the origin of the SMC and without looking for an additional UPD. This is the only reported case of a UPD 4p in a liveborn child.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.10830DOI Listing
January 2003

"Mowat-Wilson" syndrome with and without Hirschsprung disease is a distinct, recognizable multiple congenital anomalies-mental retardation syndrome caused by mutations in the zinc finger homeo box 1B gene.

Am J Med Genet 2002 Mar;108(3):177-81

Institute of Human Genetics, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany.

Recently mutations in the gene ZFHX1B (SIP1) were shown in patients with "syndromic Hirschsprung disease" with mental retardation (MR) and multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), but it was unclear if Hirschsprung disease is an obligate symptom of these mutations and if the distinct facial phenotype delineated by Mowat et al. [1998: J Med Genet 35: 617-623] is specific for ZFHX1B mutations. In order to address these open questions we analyzed the ZFHX1B gene in five patients, three of whom had "syndromic Hirschsprung disease" two with and one without the facial phenotype described by Mowat et al. [1998], and two of whom had the distinct facial gestalt without Hirschsprung disease. Analyses of microsatellite markers and newly identified SNPs, and/or FISH with BACs from the ZFHX1B region excluded large deletions in all five patients. Direct sequencing demonstrated truncating ZFHX1B mutations in all four patients with the characteristic facial phenotype, but not in the patient with syndromic Hirschsprung disease without the distinct facial appearance. We demonstrate that there is a specific clinical entity with a recognizable facial gestalt, mental retardation and variable MCAs which we propose be called the "Mowat-Wilson syndrome."
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March 2002