Publications by authors named "Bayan Sudan"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Systematic Approach to Identify Markers of Distinctly Activated Human Macrophages.

Front Immunol 2015 27;6:253. Epub 2015 May 27.

Infectious Diseases Division, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa , Iowa City, IA , USA ; Iowa City VA Medical Center , Iowa City, IA , USA.

Polarization has been a useful concept for describing activated macrophage phenotypes and gene expression profiles. However, macrophage activation status within tumors and other settings are often inferred based on only a few markers. Complicating matters for relevance to human biology, many macrophage activation markers have been best characterized in mice and sometimes are not similarly regulated in human macrophages. To identify novel markers of activated human macrophages, gene expression profiles for human macrophages of a single donor subjected to 33 distinct activating conditions were obtained and a set of putative activation markers were subsequently evaluated in macrophages from multiple donors using integrated fluidic circuit (IFC)-based RT-PCR. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarray screen, highly altered transcripts (>4-fold change in expression) sorted the macrophage transcription profiles into two major and 13 minor clusters. Among the 1874 highly altered transcripts, over 100 were uniquely altered in one major or two related minor clusters. IFC PCR-derived data confirmed the microarray results and determined the kinetics of expression of potential macrophage activation markers. Transcripts encoding chemokines, cytokines, and cell surface were prominent in our analyses. The activation markers identified by this study could be used to better characterize tumor-associated macrophages from biopsies as well as other macrophage populations collected from human clinical samples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2015.00253DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4445387PMC
June 2015

Regulation of activation-associated microRNA accumulation rates during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation.

J Biol Chem 2014 Oct 22;289(41):28433-47. Epub 2014 Aug 22.

From the Carver College of Medicine and Departments of Internal Medicine, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52246

Circulating monocytes recruited to tissues can differentiate into macrophages and adopt unique gene expression programs in response to environmental cues. We recently described the regulated expression of several microRNAs (miRNAs) in polarized human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Basal expression of these activation-associated miRNAs was low in monocytes relative to MDMs. As development occurs in the context of specific cellular environments, we hypothesized that the rate of miRNA accumulation would be modified in the presence of microbial or cellular products during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. Indeed, LPS treatment augmented the accumulation of miR-146a and miR-155, whereas IL-4 treatment augmented the accumulation of miR-193b and miR-222 during development. In contrast, some stimuli repressed accumulation of specific miRNAs including interferons (IFNs) (miR-27a, miR-125a-5p, and miR-222), IL-4 (miR-125a-5p), and LPS (miR-27a). RT-PCR-based expression profiling of monocytes differentiated with distinct methods showed that activation-associated miRNAs and markers of macrophage polarization were substantially altered in MDMs differentiated in the presence of non-monocytic peripheral blood mononuclear cells due in part to NF-κB and STAT1 pathway activation. Expression of several of these miRNAs was regulated at a preprocessing step because the expression of the primary miRNAs, but not Dicer, correlated with mature miRNA expression. We conclude that a set of miRNAs is regulated during MDM differentiation, and the rate is uniquely modified for each miRNA by environmental factors. The low basal expression of activation-associated miRNAs in monocytes and their dynamic rates of accumulation during MDM differentiation permit monocytes to tailor miRNA profiles in peripheral tissues during differentiation to macrophages.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M114.599316DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4192495PMC
October 2014

Leukocytes infiltrate the skin and draining lymph nodes in response to the protozoan Leishmania infantum chagasi.

Infect Immun 2011 Jan 11;79(1):108-17. Epub 2010 Oct 11.

Interdisciplinary Immunology Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.

The vector-borne protozoan Leishmania infantum chagasi causes minimal inflammation after inoculation into skin but disseminates to cause fatal visceral leishmaniasis. To define the inflammatory response at the parasite inoculation site, we introduced metacyclic L. infantum chagasi promastigotes intradermally into BALB/c mouse ears and studied inflammatory cells over 7 days. Ly6G(+) neutrophils rapidly infiltrated the dermis, peaking after 6 to 24 h. Macrophages and NK cells next infiltrated the dermis, and NK followed by B cells expanded in draining lymph nodes. Parasite-containing phagocytes were tracked with fluorescent mCherry-labeled L. infantum chagasi. Ly6G(+) neutrophils contained the greatest proportion of intracellular parasites 6 to 24 h after inoculation, whereas dermal macrophages harbored the majority of intracellular parasites after 2 to 7 days. These observations were validated microscopically. Low doses of antibody transiently depleted mice of neutrophils, leaving other cells intact. Combined results of in vivo imaging, flow cytometry, and quantitative PCR showed that neutrophil depletion slowed the clearance of extracellular (luciferase-positive) promastigotes during the first 24 h after inoculation yet decreased the numbers of leukocytes containing intracellular (mCherry-positive) parasites. From 3 days onward, total L. infantum chagasi-containing dermal leukocytes and total L. infantum chagasi parasites in draining lymph nodes were similar in both groups. Nonetheless, a second wave of L. infantum chagasi-containing neutrophils occurred 7 days after parasite inoculation into neutrophil-depleted mice, corresponding to the time of neutrophil recovery. Thus, neutrophils were recruited to the dermis even late after inoculation, and L. infantum chagasi trafficked through neutrophils in both neutrophil-depleted and control mice, albeit with different kinetics. Recruitment of neutrophils and transient parasite residence in neutrophils may play a role in nonulcerative forms of leishmaniasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00338-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3019875PMC
January 2011

Leishmania chagasi: homogenous metacyclic promastigotes isolated by buoyant density are highly virulent in a mouse model.

Exp Parasitol 2008 Jan 13;118(1):129-33. Epub 2007 Jul 13.

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, IA 52242, USA.

Homogenous metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania chagasi were isolated by buoyant density from in vitro heterogeneous cultures and used for biochemical characterization of isoforms of the major surface protease (MSP). Compared to stationary phase promastigotes, metacyclic cells had three times more MSP, produced 3-fold higher parasite loads in a mouse model in vivo, and were more resistant to complement-mediated lysis in vitro. These metacyclic L. chagasi expressed both the virulence-associated 59-kDa, and the constitutively expressed 63-kDa, isoforms of MSP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exppara.2007.06.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2274777PMC
January 2008

Identification of a repressor in the first intron of the human alpha2(I) collagen gene (COL1A2).

J Biol Chem 2005 Oct 8;280(42):35417-23. Epub 2005 Aug 8.

Laboratory of Genetics and Organogenesis, Research Division of the Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA.

The human and mouse genes that code for the alpha2 chain of collagen I (COL1A2 and Col1a2, respectively) share a common chromatin structure and nearly identical proximal promoter and far upstream enhancer sequences. Despite these homologies, species-specific differences have been reported regarding the function of individual cis-acting elements, such as the first intron sequence. In the present study, we have investigated the transcriptional contribution of the unique open chromatin site in the first intron of COL1A2 using a transgenic mouse model. DNase I footprinting identified a cluster of three distinct areas of nuclease protection (FI1-3) that span from nucleotides +647 to +760, relative to the transcription start site, and which contain consensus sequences for GATA and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) transcription factors. Gel mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays corroborated this last finding by documenting binding of GATA-4 and IRF-1 and IRF-2 to the first intron sequence. Moreover, a short sequence encompassing the three footprints was found to inhibit expression of transgenic constructs containing the COL1A2 proximal promoter and far upstream enhancer in a position-independent manner. Mutations inserted into each of the footprints restored transgenic expression to different extents. These results therefore indicated that the unique open chromatin site of COL1A2 corresponds to a repressor, the activity of which seems to be mediated by the concerted action of GATA and IRF proteins. More generally, the study reiterated the existence of species-specific difference in the regulatory networks of the mammalian alpha2(I) collagen coding genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M502681200DOI Listing
October 2005