Publications by authors named "Bartosz Bezubik"

2 Publications

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Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Support Endometriotic Stromal Cells .

Stem Cells Int 2018 28;2018:7318513. Epub 2018 Jan 28.

Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Endometriosis is an inflammatory disease marked by ectopic growth of endometrial cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have immunosuppressive properties that have been suggested as a treatment for inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim herein was to examine effects of allogeneic MSC on endometriosis-derived cells as a potential therapy for endometriosis. MSC from allogeneic adipose tissue (Ad-MSC) and stromal cells from endometrium (ESC) and endometriotic ovarian cysts (ESC) from women with endometriosis were isolated. The effects of Ad-MSC on ESC and ESC were investigated using proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, tube formation, migration, and invasion assays. Ad-MSC significantly increased proliferation of ESC compared to untreated controls. Moreover, Ad-MSC significantly decreased apoptosis and increased survival of ESC. Ad-MSC significantly increased adhesion of ESC and not ESC on fibronectin. Conditioned medium from cocultures of Ad-MSC and ESC significantly increased tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells on matrigel. Ad-MSC may significantly increase migration of ESC and did not increase invasion of both cell types. The data suggest that allogeneic Ad-MSC should not be considered as a potential therapy for endometriosis, because they may support the pathology by maintaining and increasing growth of ectopic endometrial tissue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/7318513DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5833193PMC
January 2018

Neuroprotective effects of human spinal cord-derived neural precursor cells after transplantation to the injured spinal cord.

Exp Neurol 2014 Mar 8;253:138-45. Epub 2014 Jan 8.

Division of Neurodegeneration, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Geriatric Clinic Res Lab., Novum, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Mariebergsgatan 22, S-11235 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address:

To validate human neural precursor cells (NPCs) as potential donor cells for transplantation therapy after spinal cord injury (SCI), we investigated the effect of NPCs, transplanted as neurospheres, in two different rat SCI models. Human spinal cord-derived NPCs (SC-NPCs) transplanted 9 days after spinal contusion injury enhanced hindlimb recovery, assessed by the BBB locomotor test. In spinal compression injuries, SC-NPCs transplanted immediately or after 1 week, but not 7 weeks after injury, significantly improved hindlimb recovery compared to controls. We could not detect signs of mechanical allodynia in transplanted rats. Four months after transplantation, we found more human cells in the host spinal cord than were transplanted, irrespective of the time of transplantation. There was no focal tumor growth. In all groups the vast majority of NPCs differentiated into astrocytes. Importantly, the number of surviving rat spinal cord neurons was highest in groups transplanted acutely and subacutely, which also showed the best hindlimb function. This suggests that transplanted SC-NPCs improve the functional outcome by a neuroprotective effect. We conclude that SC-NPCs reliably enhance the functional outcome after SCI if transplanted acutely or subacutely, without causing allodynia. This therapeutic effect is mainly the consequence of a neuroprotective effect of the SC-NPCs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2013.12.022DOI Listing
March 2014