Publications by authors named "Barrie Sugarman"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Utility of postoperative hemoglobin testing following total shoulder arthroplasty.

JSES Int 2021 Jan 8;5(1):149-153. Epub 2020 Sep 8.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Background: Identifying areas of excess cost for shoulder arthroplasty patients can play a role in effective health care spending. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of postoperative complete blood count (CBC) testing after total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and identify which patients benefit from routine CBC testing.

Methods: We performed a retrospective review of a cohort of patients who underwent primary TSA from January 2018 through January 2019. All patients in this cohort received tranexamic acid. Patient demographic characteristics and patient-specific risk factors such as American Society of Anesthesiologists score, Elixhauser index, body mass index, smoking status, and coagulopathy history were obtained. Perioperative values including length of surgery, preoperative and postoperative hemoglobin (Hgb) levels, and need for transfusion were also obtained.

Results: This study included 387 TSA patients in the final analysis. Comparison between the cohort requiring transfusion and the cohort undergoing no intervention revealed no statistically significant differences in age, sex, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, or Elixhauser index. The group receiving transfusions was found to have significantly lower levels of preoperative Hgb (11.3 g/dL) and postoperative Hgb (8.1 g/dL) ( < .0001). Additionally, the percentages of patients with abnormal preoperative Hgb levels (<12 g/dL) (72.3%) and postoperative day 1 Hgb levels < 9 g/dL (81.8%) were significantly higher in the group receiving transfusions ( < .0001). A multivariate regression model identified an abnormal preoperative Hgb level (<12 g/dL), with an odds ratio of 3.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.5-6.2; < .001), and postoperative day 1 Hgb level < 9 g/dL, with an odds ratio of 3.3 (95% confidence interval, 0.4-6.1; < .03), as significant predictors of the risk of transfusion with a sensitivity of 64% and specificity of 96.2% with an area under the curve of 0.87.

Conclusion: Routine CBC testing may not be necessary for patients who receive tranexamic acid and have preoperative Hgb levels > 12 mg/dL and first postoperative Hgb levels > 9 mg/dL. This translates to potential health care cost savings and improves current evidence-based perioperative management in shoulder arthroplasty.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jseint.2020.07.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7846688PMC
January 2021

Trends in reimbursement for primary and revision total elbow arthroplasty.

J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2021 Jan 28;30(1):146-150. Epub 2020 Jun 28.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Background: Relative value units (RVUs) are an essential component of reimbursement calculations from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. RVUs are calculated based on physician work, practice expense, and professional liability insurance. Procedures that are more complex, such as revision arthroplasty, require greater levels of physician work and should therefore be assigned a greater RVU. The purpose of this study is to compare RVUs assigned for primary and revision total elbow arthroplasty (TEA).

Methods: The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to collect all primary and revision total elbow arthroplasties performed between January 2015 and December 2017. Variables collected included age at time of surgery, RVUs assigned for the procedure, and operative time.

Results: A total of 359 cases (282 primary TEA, 77 revision TEA) were included in this study. Mean RVUs for primary TEA was 21.4 (2.0 standard deviation [SD]) vs. 24.4 (1.7 SD) for revision arthroplasty (P < .001). Mean operative time for primary TEA was 137.9 minutes (24.4 SD) vs. 185.5 minutes (99.7 SD) for revision TEA (P < .001). The RVU per minute for primary TEA was 0.16 and revision TEA was 0.13 (P < .001). This amounts to a yearly reimbursement difference of $71,024 in favor of primary TEA over revision TEA.

Conclusion: The current reimbursement model does not adequately account for increased operative time, technical demand, and pre- and postoperative care associated with revision elbow arthroplasty compared with primary TEA. This leads to a financial advantage on performing primary TEA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2020.06.004DOI Listing
January 2021

Factors Associated With Extended Length of Stay and 90-Day Readmission Rates Following ACDF.

Global Spine J 2020 May 20;10(3):252-260. Epub 2019 May 20.

Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Study Design: Retrospective.

Objective: Identify patient risk factors for extended length of stay (LOS) and 90-day hospital readmissions following elective anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF).

Methods: Included ACDF patients from 2013 to 2017 at a single institution. Eligible patients were subset into LOS <2 and LOS ≥2 days, and no 90-day hospital readmission and yes 90-day hospital readmission. Patient and surgical factors were compared between the LOS and readmission groups. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was utilized to determine the association of independent factors with LOS and 90-day readmission rates.

Results: Our sample included 1896 patients; 265 (14%) had LOS ≥2 days, and 121 (6.4%) had a readmission within 90 days of surgery. Patient and surgical factors associated with LOS included patient age ≥65 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15-2.56), marriage (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.43-0.79), private health insurance (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.15-0.50), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.12-1.86), African American race (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.38-2.72), and harvesting iliac crest autograft (OR 4.94, 95% CI 2.31-10.8). Patient and surgical factors associated with 90-day hospital readmission included ASA score (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.32-2.49), length of surgery (OR 1.002, 95% CI 1.001-1.004), and radiculopathy as indication for surgery (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.39-0.96).

Conclusions: Extended LOS and 90-day hospital readmissions may lead to poorer patient outcomes and increased episode of care costs. Our study identified patient and surgical factors associated with extended LOS and 90-day readmission rates. In general, preoperative patient factors affected these outcomes more than surgical factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2192568219843111DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7160814PMC
May 2020
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