Publications by authors named "Barbara Semakula"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Wilderness Preparticipation Evaluation and Considerations for Special Populations.

Wilderness Environ Med 2015 Dec;26(4 Suppl):S76-91

Longs Peak Sports Medicine, Longmont, Colorado (Dr Madden).

Children, older adults, disabled and special needs athletes, and female athletes who participate in outdoor and wilderness sports and activities each face unique risks. For children and adolescents traveling to high altitude, the preparticipation physical evaluation should focus on risk assessment, prevention strategies, early recognition of altitude-related symptoms, management plans, and appropriate follow-up. As the risk and prevalence of chronic disease increases with age, both older patients and providers need to be aware of disease and medication-specific risks relative to wilderness sport and activity participation. Disabled and special needs athletes benefit from careful pre-event planning for the potential medical issues and equipment modifications that may affect their health in wilderness environments. Issues that demand special consideration for female adventurers include pregnancy, contraceptive use, menses, and ferritin levels at altitude. A careful preparticipation evaluation that factors in unique, population- specific risks will help special populations stay healthy and safe on wilderness adventures. The PubMed and SportDiscus databases were searched in 2014 using both MeSH terms and text words and include peer-reviewed English language articles from 1977 to 2014. Additional information was accessed from Web-based sources to produce this narrative review on preparticipation evaluation for special populations undertaking wilderness adventures. Key words include children, adolescent, pediatric, seniors, elderly, disabled, special needs, female, athlete, preparticipiation examination, wilderness medicine, and sports.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2015.09.010DOI Listing
December 2015

Wilderness Preparticipation Evaluation and Considerations for Special Populations.

Clin J Sport Med 2015 Sep;25(5):443-55

*Clinical Outcomes Research, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah; †Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado; ‡CJW Sports Medicine, Richmond, Virginia; §Anne Arundel Medical Center, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center, Annapolis, Maryland; ¶Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri; ‖Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado; **Big Island Family Medicine Center, Lynchburg, Virginia; and ††Longs Peak Sports Medicine, Longmont, Colorado.

Children, older adults, disabled and special needs athletes, and female athletes who participate in outdoor and wilderness sports and activities each face unique risks. For children and adolescents traveling to high altitude, the preparticipation physical evaluation should focus on risk assessment, prevention strategies, early recognition of altitude-related symptoms, management plans, and appropriate follow-up. As the risk and prevalence of chronic disease increases with age, both older patients and providers need to be aware of disease and medication-specific risks relative to wilderness sport and activity participation. Disabled and special needs athletes benefit from careful pre-event planning for the potential medical issues and equipment modifications that may affect their health in wilderness environments. Issues that demand special consideration for female adventurers include pregnancy, contraceptive use, menses, and ferritin levels at altitude. A careful preparticipation evaluation that factors in unique, population-specific risks will help special populations stay healthy and safe on wilderness adventures. The PubMed and SportDiscus databases were searched in 2014 using both MeSH terms and text words and include peer-reviewed English language articles from 1977 to 2014. Additional information was accessed from Web-based sources to produce this narrative review on preparticipation evaluation for special populations undertaking wilderness adventures. Key words include children, adolescent, pediatric, seniors, elderly, disabled, special needs, female, athlete, preparticipiation examination, wilderness medicine, and sports.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSM.0000000000000251DOI Listing
September 2015

Anterior cruciate ligament tear: surgical reconstruction versus nonsurgical management.

PM R 2012 Dec;4(12):1006-14

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2012.11.001DOI Listing
December 2012

Hodgkin lymphoma-like posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder.

Arch Pathol Lab Med 2006 Apr;130(4):558-60

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA.

Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a heterogeneous group of monoclonal or polyclonal lymphoproliferative lesions that occur in immunosuppressed recipients following solid organ or bone marrow transplantation, including 4 categories: (1) early lesions (reactive plasmacytic hyperplasia, and infectious-mononucleosis-like PTLD), (2) polymorphic PTLD, (3) monomorphic PTLD (including B-cell neoplasms and T-cell neoplasms), and (4) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and HL-like PTLD in the current World Health Organization classification. Although HL-like PTLD has been grouped with classic HL PTLD, controversy remains as to whether it is truly a form of HL or whether it should be more appropriately considered as a form of B-cell PTLD. The current available literature data indicate the presence of important immunophenotypic, molecular genetic, and clinical differences between HL PTLD and HL-like PTLD, suggesting that HL-like PTLD is in fact most often a form of B-cell PTLD. Distinction from true HL may be important for clinical management and prognosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5858/2006-130-558-HLPLDDOI Listing
April 2006
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