Publications by authors named "Bandar M A Al Makramani"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Sensitizing Family Caregivers to Influence Treatment Compliance among Elderly Neglected Patients-A 2-Year Longitudinal Study Outcome in Completely Edentulous Patients.

Healthcare (Basel) 2021 May 2;9(5). Epub 2021 May 2.

Department of Prosthetic Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, Jazan University, Jazan 45142, Saudi Arabia.

Healthcare workers have reported a certain segment of geriatric patients that are suffering from abuse/neglect, which in turn has been associated with anxiety, depression, and helplessness in the individual. Family caregivers (blood relations), being the most common perpetrators of elder abuse and neglect (EAN), have also been shown to respond to sensitization if the type of EAN and the interventions are appropriate. This study was aimed to comparatively analyze the influence of intervention (psychotherapeutic sensitization of FCG) upon long-term (24 months) treatment maintenance and satisfaction in elderly neglected patients. One hundred and fifty patients (aged 41-80 years) suffering from elder neglect (EN) (self-confession) and their respective FCGs, fulfilling the study criteria, participated in this longitudinal 2-year study. The patients were randomly distributed (simple random, convenient) in two equal groups (75 each), namely Group (GP) A (control) and GP B (test). A standardized, complete denture treatment was initiated for all the participants. Both the FCGs and the patients of GP B were sensitized (psychotherapeutic education) for EN, while there was no such intervention in GP A. The influence of such intervention was measured for denture maintenance [denture plaque index (DPI) scores] and treatment satisfaction (10-point visual analog scale). Absolute/relative frequencies and means were major calculations during data analysis. Differences between the groups for any treatment compliance parameter was done through the unpaired -test, while Karl Pearson's test determined the level of relationship between variables (-value < 0.05). Decrease in mean DPI scores (suggesting improvement) was seen among patients in GP A from 1 month (m = 2.92) to 24 months (m = 2.77). A negligible increase in DPI scores was observed among patients of GP B from 1 month (m = 1.38) to 24 months (m = 1.44). Differences in mean values between the two groups were statistically significant at 24-month intervals, while the relationship between the variables was nonsignificant. FCG sensitization through psychotherapeutic education shows a long-term positive influence on the treatment compliance (maintenance and satisfaction). Identifying the existence of EAN among geriatric patients, followed by psychotherapeutic education of FCGs is recommended for routine medical and dental long-duration treatment procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050533DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8147452PMC
May 2021

Effect of Luting Cements On the Bond Strength to Turkom-Cera All-Ceramic Material.

Open Access Maced J Med Sci 2018 Mar 9;6(3):548-553. Epub 2018 Mar 9.

Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Advanced Education General Dentistry and Dental Public Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Background: The selection of the appropriate luting cement is a key factor for achieving a strong bond between prepared teeth and dental restorations.

Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength of Zinc phosphate cement Elite, glass ionomer cement Fuji I, resin-modified glass ionomer cement Fuji Plus and resin luting cement Panavia-F to Turkom-Cera all-ceramic material.

Materials And Methods: Turkom-Cera was used to form discs 10mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness (n = 40). The ceramic discs were wet ground, air - particle abraded with 50 - μm aluminium oxide particles and randomly divided into four groups (n = 10). The luting cement was bonded to Turkom-Cera discs as per manufacturer instructions. The shear bond strengths were determined using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analysed using the tests One Way ANOVA, the nonparametric Kruskal - Wallis test and Mann - Whitney Post hoc test.

Results: The shear bond strength of the Elite, Fuji I, Fuji Plus and Panavia F groups were: 0.92 ± 0.42, 2.04 ± 0.78, 4.37 ± 1.18, and 16.42 ± 3.38 MPa, respectively. There was the statistically significant difference between the four luting cement tested (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: the phosphate-containing resin cement Panavia-F exhibited shear bond strength value significantly higher than all materials tested.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2018.111DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5874383PMC
March 2018

Dental prosthetic status and treatment needs of adult population in Jizan, Saudi Arabia: A survey report.

Eur J Dent 2016 Oct-Dec;10(4):459-463

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Prosthodontics, Jazan University, Jazan, KSA.

Objectives: The study aimed to evaluate and compare the dental prosthetic status and treatment needs of adult population in Jizan, Saudi Arabia, in relation to the age.

Materials And Methods: A total of 1779 people aged 35-74 years from 4 survey areas (, , , and ) selected through convenient sampling, around Jizan University, were surveyed, using the WHO survey criteria, 1997.

Statistical Analysis: Number and percentages were calculated, and univariate analysis was performed using Chi-square test at 5% level of significance.

Results: Different forms of prosthesis were present among patients in the upper (19.9%) and lower (19%) arches, respectively. Prosthetic treatment need was recognized in subjects, 56.4% for the upper and 57.2% for the lower arches, respectively. The prosthetic status and treatment needs differed statistically with respect to age.

Conclusion: More than half of the surveyed adult populations were in need of some or the other forms of prosthesis. This study provides data for an oral health-care provider program for Jizan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1305-7456.195173DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5166299PMC
January 2017

Marginal integrity of turkom-cera compared to other all-ceramic materials: effect of finish line.

Int J Prosthodont 2011 Jul-Aug;24(4):379-81

The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of Turkom-Cera all-ceramic crowns compared to In-Ceram and Procera AllCeram systems. The influence of finish line design (chamfer or shoulder) on the marginal adaptation of Turkom-Cera all-ceramic crowns was also investigated. Thirty human premolars were prepared with chamfer margins and assigned to either the Turkom-Cera, In-Ceram, or Procera system group. In addition, 10 premolars were prepared with rounded shoulder finish lines and assigned to an additional Turkom-Cera group. Ceramic copings (0.6-mm thick) were fabricated for each group following the manufacturers' instructions. The copings were seated on abutments using a special holding device that facilitated uniform loading, and marginal adaptation was assessed using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance, the Tukey HSD post hoc test, and an independent samples t test. There was a statistically significant difference regarding marginal adaptation among the three all-ceramic systems (P < .05). There were no significant differences in the mean marginal discrepancies of Turkom-Cera crowns among chamfer and shoulder finish line groups (P > .05). Within the limitations of this study, the marginal discrepancies were all within the clinically acceptable standard. Int J Prosthodont 2011;24:379-381.
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April 2016

Comparison of the load at fracture of Turkom-Cera to Procera AllCeram and In-Ceram all-ceramic restorations.

J Prosthodont 2009 Aug;18(6):484-8

Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Purpose: This study investigated the occlusal fracture resistance of Turkom-Cerafused alumina compared to Procera AllCeram and In-Ceram all-ceramic restorations.

Materials And Methods: Sixmaster dies were duplicated from the prepared maxillary first premolar tooth using nonprecious metal alloy (Wiron 99). Ten copings of 0.6 mm thickness were fabricated from each type of ceramic, for a total of thirty copings. Two master dies were used for each group, and each of them was used to lute five copings. All groups were cemented with resin luting cement Panavia F according to manufacturer's instructions and received a static load of 5 kg during cementation. After 24 hours of distilled water storage at 37 degrees C, the copings were vertically compressed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min.

Results: The results of the present study showed the following mean loads at fracture: Turkom-Cera (2184 +/- 164 N), In-Ceram (2042 +/- 200 N), and Procera AllCeram (1954 +/- 211 N). ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc test showed that the mean load at fracture of Turkom-Cera was significantly different from Procera AllCeram (p < 0.05). Scheffe's post hoc test showed no significant difference between the mean load at fracture of Turkom-Cera and In-Ceram or between the mean load at fracture of In-Ceram and Procera AllCeram.

Conclusion: Because Turkom-Cera demonstrated equal to or higher loads at fracture than currently accepted all-ceramic materials, it would seem to be acceptable for fabrication of anterior and posterior ceramic crowns.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-849x.2009.00467.xDOI Listing
August 2009

Effect of luting cements on the compressive strength of Turkom-Cera all-ceramic copings.

J Contemp Dent Pract 2008 Feb 1;9(2):33-40. Epub 2008 Feb 1.

Department of Conservative Dentistry of the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Aim: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of different luting agents on the fracture strength of Turkom-Cera all-ceramic copings.

Methods And Materials: Standardized metal dies were duplicated from a prepared maxillary first premolar tooth using non-precious metal alloy (Wiron 99). Thirty Turkom-Cera copings of 0.6 mm thickness were then fabricated. Three types of luting agents were used: zinc phosphate cement (Elite), glass-ionomer cement (Fuji I), and a dual-cured composite resin cement (Panavia F). Ten copings were cemented with each type. All copings were cemented to their respective dies according to manufacturer's instructions and received a static load of 5 kg for ten minutes. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, the copings were vertically loaded until fracture using an Instron Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The mode of fracture was then determined.

Results: Statistical analysis carried out using analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant differences in the compressive strength between the three groups (P<0.001). The mean fracture strength (in Newtons) of Turkom-Cera copings cemented with Elite, Fuji I, and Panavia F were 1537.4 N, 1294.4 N, and 2183.6 N, respectively.

Conclusions: Luting agents have an influence on the fracture resistance of Turkom-Cera copings.
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February 2008

Evaluation of load at fracture of Procera AllCeram copings using different luting cements.

J Prosthodont 2008 Feb 28;17(2):120-124. Epub 2007 Nov 28.

Postgraduate Student, Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaHead, Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaDean, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Malaysia.

Purpose: The current study investigated the effect of different luting agents on the fracture resistance of Procera AllCeram copings.

Methods: Six master dies were duplicated from the prepared maxillary first premolar tooth using nonprecious metal alloy (Wiron 99). Thirty copings (Procera AllCeram) of 0.6-mm thickness were manufactured. Three types of luting media were used: zinc phosphate cement (Elite), glass ionomer cement (Fuji I), and dual-cured composite resin cement (Panavia F). Ten copings were cemented with each type. Two master dies were used for each group, and each of them was used to lute five copings. All groups were cemented according to manufacturer's instructions and received a static load of 5 kg during cementation. After 24 hours of distilled water storage at 37 degrees C, the copings were vertically compressed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min.

Results: ANOVA revealed significant differences in the load at fracture among the three groups (p < 0.001). The fracture strength results showed that the mean fracture strength of zinc phosphate cement (Elite), glass ionomer cement (Fuji I), and resin luting cement (Panavia F) were 1091.9 N, 784.8 N, and 1953.5 N, respectively.

Conclusion: Different luting agents have an influence on the fracture resistance of Procera AllCeram copings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-849X.2007.00270.xDOI Listing
February 2008
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