Publications by authors named "Bandar A Suliman"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Dynamics of COVID-19 Lockdown on Blood Indices and Its Impact on Individuals' Immunological Health Status: A Cohort Study in Madinah, Saudi Arabia.

Authors:
Bandar A Suliman

J Blood Med 2021 31;12:395-402. Epub 2021 May 31.

College of Applied Medical Sciences, Taibah University, Madinah, Saudi Arabia.

Objective: The complete blood count (CBC) is an essential blood test that has been used for decades to assess individuals' overall health status. This study aimed to investigate the contributions of lockdown conditions to individuals' overall health status using blood indices as biological markers. During lockdown, people are limited to confined spaces, have access to limited nutritional supply options, experience increased stress, and are exposed to other environmental factors.

Methods: Our study's target population included all outpatients who were severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-negative and requested CBC assessments as part of their routine health checks. A total of 2414 CBC results were included, covering a period from February 2019 to December 2020. The average of different blood indices during the COVID-19 lockdown was compared to the 10-month period preceding the lockdown.

Results: The average counts of RBCs, hemoglobin, and hematocrit showed a significant increase during the lockdown period, which lasted from May 2020 to September 2020. Reductions were observed for the RBC distribution width, total white blood cell count, platelets, and platelet distribution width.

Conclusion: Our findings suggested that the overall health status of individuals improved during the lockdown period in the short term, but health status might be adversely affected under these conditions of a longer period. Both RDW and PDW could be used as indicators for the overall health status when assessed against other blood indices.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JBM.S312177DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8178699PMC
May 2021

The detection of SARS-CoV-2 in outpatient clinics and public facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

J Med Virol 2021 05 10;93(5):2955-2961. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Taibah University, Madinah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

The transmission of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can occur through an airborne route, in addition to contaminated surfaces and objects. In hospitals, it has been confirmed by several studies that SARS-CoV-2 can contaminate surfaces and medical equipment especially in hospitals dedicated to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. The aim of this study was to detect the contamination of hands, objects, and surfaces in isolation rooms and also in outpatients' clinics in hospitals and polyclinics. Environmental contamination of public high-touch surfaces in public facilities was also investigated during an active COVID-19 pandemic. Random swabs were also taken from public shops, pharmacies, bakeries, groceries, banknotes, and automated teller machines (ATMs). Samples were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 positivity using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the COVID-19 regional reference hospital, only 3 out of 20 samples were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Hand swabs from SARS-CoV-2-positive patients in isolation rooms were occasionally positive for viral RNA. In outpatients' clinics, door handles were the most contaminated surfaces. Dental chairs, sinks, keyboards, ophthalmoscopes, and laboratory equipment were also contaminated. Although no positive swabs were found in shops and public facilities, random ATM swabs returned a positive result for SARS-CoV-2. Although there is no longer a focus on COVID-19 wards and isolation hospitals, more attention is required to decontaminate frequently touched surfaces in health-care facilities used by patients not diagnosed with COVID-19. Additionally, high-touch public surfaces such as ATMs require further disinfection procedures to limit the transmission of the infection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.26819DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8014553PMC
May 2021

Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger triggers ATP-binding cassette subfamily E member 1-mediated growth inhibition in breast cancer cells.

Oncol Lett 2018 Oct 24;16(4):4143-4150. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Molecular Biomedicine Program, Research Center, King Faisal Specialist Hospital, Riyadh 12713, Saudi Arabia.

The promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) protein is a transcription factor that is involved in a number of biological processes, including those regulating cellular growth; however, little is known regarding how it achieves its inhibitory effect in different cell and tissue types. It has previously been demonstrated that PLZF expression levels become diminished during the oncogenic transformation of certain tissue types and thus, may serve as a hallmark for tumor aggressiveness. To examine this in breast cancer, survival curves from available oncology databases were analyzed and demonstrated that PLZF expression was positively associated with increased survival in patients with breast cancer. The mRNA and protein levels of PLZF were also revealed to be associated with the tumorigenicity of four breast cancer cell lines. Since ATP-binding cassette subfamily E member 1 (ABCE1), also known as RNase L inhibitor, has been determined to be a target gene of PLZF, the present study also investigated whether the tumor suppressive effect of PLZF was associated with ABCE1 expression. PLZF was revealed to downregulate the expression of ABCE1 , which relieved the inhibitory effect of ABCE1 on the ribonuclease L enzyme. Finally, it was concluded that PLZF expression caused an ABCE1-mediated increase in cellular cytotoxicity, as demonstrated by a reduction in the proliferation rate of breast cancer cell lines. The results of the present study are important for understanding how PLZF exerts its final inhibitory actions in breast cancer cells, and potentially in other solid tumors, through the modulation of immunological pathways.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ol.2018.9207DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6126154PMC
October 2018

MERS-CoV infection in humans is associated with a pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 cytokine profile.

Cytokine 2018 04 2;104:8-13. Epub 2018 Feb 2.

Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Taibah University, Madinah, Saudi Arabia; Molecular Biomedicine Program, Research Center, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been recognized as a highly pathogenic virus to humans that infects the respiratory tract and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Studies in animal models suggest that MERS-CoV infection induces a strong inflammatory response, which may be related to the severity of disease. Data showing the cytokine profiles in humans during the acute phase of MERS-CoV infection are limited. In this study, we have analyzed the profile of cytokine responses in plasma samples from patients with confirmed MERS-CoV infections (n = 7) compared to healthy controls (n = 13). The cytokine profiles, including T helper (Th) 1, Th2 and Th17 responses, were analyzed using cytometric bead array (CBA). A prominent pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 response was clearly seen in patients with MERS-CoV infection, with markedly increased concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-15 and IL-17 compared to controls. IL-12 expression levels showed no difference between patients with MERS-CoV infection and the healthy controls despite the significantly increased levels of IFN-α2 and IFN-γ (P < .01). No changes were observed in the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and TGF-α (P > .05). Our results demonstrate a marked pro-inflammatory cytokine response during the acute phase of MERS-CoV infection in humans.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2018.01.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7129230PMC
April 2018

A Comprehensive In Silico Analysis on the Structural and Functional Impact of SNPs in the Congenital Heart Defects Associated with NKX2-5 Gene-A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Approach.

PLoS One 2016 6;11(5):e0153999. Epub 2016 May 6.

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman.

Congenital heart defects (CHD) presented as structural defects in the heart and blood vessels during birth contribute an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many Single nucletotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in different genes have been associated with various types of congenital heart defects. NKX 2-5 gene is one among them, which encodes a homeobox-containing transcription factor that plays a crucial role during the initial phases of heart formation and development. Mutations in this gene could cause different types of congenital heart defects, including Atrial septal defect (ASD), Atrial ventricular block (AVB), Tetralogy of fallot and ventricular septal defect. This highlights the importance of studying the impact of different SNPs found within this gene that might cause structural and functional modification of its encoded protein. In this study, we retrieved SNPs from the database (dbSNP), followed by identification of potentially deleterious Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) and prediction of their effect on proteins by computational screening using SIFT and Polyphen. Furthermore, we have carried out molecular dynamic simulation (MDS) in order to uncover the SNPs that would cause the most structural damage to the protein altering its biological function. The most important SNP that was found using our approach was rs137852685 R161P, which was predicted to cause the most damage to the structural features of the protein. Mapping nsSNPs in genes such as NKX 2-5 would provide valuable information about individuals carrying these polymorphisms, where such variations could be used as diagnostic markers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0153999PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4859487PMC
July 2017

The acetyltransferase HAT1 moderates the NF-κB response by regulating the transcription factor PLZF.

Nat Commun 2015 Apr 13;6:6795. Epub 2015 Apr 13.

1] Hudson Institute of Medical Research, 27-31 Wright Street, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia [2] Department of Molecular and Translational Science, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3168, Australia [3] Institute of Ageing Research, Hangzhou Normal University School of Medicine, 1378 Wenyi Road West, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 311121, China.

To date, the activities of protein kinases have formed the core of our understanding of cell signal transduction. Comprehension of the extent of protein acetylation has raised expectations that this alternate post-transcriptional modification will be shown to rival phosphorylation in its importance in mediating cellular responses. However, limited instances have been identified. Here we show that signalling from Toll-like or TNF-α receptors triggers the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK2) to activate histone acetyltransferase-1 (HAT1), which then acetylates the transcriptional regulator PLZF. Acetylation of PLZF promotes the assembly of a repressor complex incorporating HDAC3 and the NF-κB p50 subunit that limits the NF-κB response. Accordingly, diminishing the activity of CaMK2, the expression levels of PLZF or HAT1, or mutating key residues that are covalently modified in PLZF and HAT1, curtails control of the production of inflammatory cytokines. These results identify a central role for acetylation in controlling the inflammatory NF-κB transcriptional programme.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms7795DOI Listing
April 2015