Publications by authors named "Bamidele O Tayo"

76 Publications

Discovery and fine-mapping of height loci via high-density imputation of GWASs in individuals of African ancestry.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 04 12;108(4):564-582. Epub 2021 Mar 12.

The Charles R. Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Although many loci have been associated with height in European ancestry populations, very few have been identified in African ancestry individuals. Furthermore, many of the known loci have yet to be generalized to and fine-mapped within a large-scale African ancestry sample. We performed sex-combined and sex-stratified meta-analyses in up to 52,764 individuals with height and genome-wide genotyping data from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC). We additionally combined our African ancestry meta-analysis results with published European genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. In the African ancestry analyses, we identified three novel loci (SLC4A3, NCOA2, ECD/FAM149B1) in sex-combined results and two loci (CRB1, KLF6) in women only. In the African plus European sex-combined GWAS, we identified an additional three novel loci (RCCD1, G6PC3, CEP95) which were equally driven by AAAGC and European results. Among 39 genome-wide significant signals at known loci, conditioning index SNPs from European studies identified 20 secondary signals. Two of the 20 new secondary signals and none of the 8 novel loci had minor allele frequencies (MAF) < 5%. Of 802 known European height signals, 643 displayed directionally consistent associations with height, of which 205 were nominally significant (p < 0.05) in the African ancestry sex-combined sample. Furthermore, 148 of 241 loci contained ≤20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% of the posterior probability of driving the associations. In summary, trans-ethnic meta-analyses revealed novel signals and further improved fine-mapping of putative causal variants in loci shared between African and European ancestry populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.02.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8059339PMC
April 2021

Engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1) and apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) as candidate genes for sickle cell nephropathy.

Br J Haematol 2021 05 20;193(3):628-632. Epub 2020 Nov 20.

Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Sickle cell disease (SCD) and apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) G1/G2 variants increase chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk in African Americans by poorly understood mechanisms. We applied bioinformatics to identify new candidate genes associated with SCD-related CKD. An interaction network demonstrated APOA1 connecting haemoglobin subunit β (HBB) and APOL1 with 36 other candidate genes. Gene expression revealed upregulation of engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1) and downregulation of APOA1 in the kidney cortex of SCD versus non-SCD mice. Analysis of candidate genes identified ELMO1 rs10951509 to be associated with albuminuria and APOA1 rs11216132 with haemoglobinuria in patients with SCD. A bioinformatic approach highlights ELMO1 and APOA1 as potentially associated with SCD nephropathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.17224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8084902PMC
May 2021

Meta-analysis uncovers genome-wide significant variants for rapid kidney function decline.

Kidney Int 2021 04 31;99(4):926-939. Epub 2020 Oct 31.

Division of Nephrology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; Kidney Research Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Rapid decline of glomerular filtration rate estimated from creatinine (eGFRcrea) is associated with severe clinical endpoints. In contrast to cross-sectionally assessed eGFRcrea, the genetic basis for rapid eGFRcrea decline is largely unknown. To help define this, we meta-analyzed 42 genome-wide association studies from the Chronic Kidney Diseases Genetics Consortium and United Kingdom Biobank to identify genetic loci for rapid eGFRcrea decline. Two definitions of eGFRcrea decline were used: 3 mL/min/1.73m/year or more ("Rapid3"; encompassing 34,874 cases, 107,090 controls) and eGFRcrea decline 25% or more and eGFRcrea under 60 mL/min/1.73m at follow-up among those with eGFRcrea 60 mL/min/1.73m or more at baseline ("CKDi25"; encompassing 19,901 cases, 175,244 controls). Seven independent variants were identified across six loci for Rapid3 and/or CKDi25: consisting of five variants at four loci with genome-wide significance (near UMOD-PDILT (2), PRKAG2, WDR72, OR2S2) and two variants among 265 known eGFRcrea variants (near GATM, LARP4B). All these loci were novel for Rapid3 and/or CKDi25 and our bioinformatic follow-up prioritized variants and genes underneath these loci. The OR2S2 locus is novel for any eGFRcrea trait including interesting candidates. For the five genome-wide significant lead variants, we found supporting effects for annual change in blood urea nitrogen or cystatin-based eGFR, but not for GATM or LARP4B. Individuals at high compared to those at low genetic risk (8-14 vs. 0-5 adverse alleles) had a 1.20-fold increased risk of acute kidney injury (95% confidence interval 1.08-1.33). Thus, our identified loci for rapid kidney function decline may help prioritize therapeutic targets and identify mechanisms and individuals at risk for sustained deterioration of kidney function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.kint.2020.09.030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8010357PMC
April 2021

The Sickle Cell Disease Ontology: Enabling Collaborative Research and Co-Designing of New Planetary Health Applications.

OMICS 2020 10;24(10):559-567

Department of Public Health Sciences, Parkinson School of Health Sciences and Public Health, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois, USA.

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common blood disorders impacting planetary health. Over 300,000 newborns are diagnosed with SCD each year globally, with an increasing trend. The sickle cell disease ontology (SCDO) is the most comprehensive multidisciplinary SCD knowledge portal. The SCDO was collaboratively developed by the SCDO working group, which includes experts in SCD and data standards from across the globe. This expert review presents highlights and lessons learned from the fourth SCDO workshop that marked the beginning of applications toward planetary health impact, and with an eye to empower and cultivate multisite SCD collaborative research. The workshop was organized by the Sickle Africa Data Coordinating Center (SADaCC) and attended by 44 participants from 14 countries, with 2 participants connecting remotely. Notably, from the standpoint of democratizing and innovating scientific meeting design, an SCD patient advocate also presented at the workshop, giving a broader real-life perspective on patients' aspirations, needs, and challenges. A major component of the workshop was new approaches to harness SCDO to harmonize data elements used by different studies. This was facilitated by a web-based platform onto which participants uploaded data elements from previous or ongoing SCD-relevant research studies before the workshop, making multisite collaborative research studies based on existing SCD data possible, including multisite cohort, SCD global clinical trials, and SCD community engagement approaches. Trainees presented proposals for systematic literature reviews in key SCD research areas. This expert review emphasizes potential and prospects of SCDO-enabled data standards and harmonization to facilitate large-scale global SCD collaborative initiatives. As the fields of public and global health continue to broaden toward planetary health, the SCDO is well poised to play a prominent role to decipher SCD pathophysiology further, and co-design diagnostics and therapeutics innovation in the field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/omi.2020.0153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7549008PMC
October 2020

Gene-educational attainment interactions in a multi-ancestry genome-wide meta-analysis identify novel blood pressure loci.

Mol Psychiatry 2021 Jun 5;26(6):2111-2125. Epub 2020 May 5.

Health Disparities Research Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, 21224, USA.

Educational attainment is widely used as a surrogate for socioeconomic status (SES). Low SES is a risk factor for hypertension and high blood pressure (BP). To identify novel BP loci, we performed multi-ancestry meta-analyses accounting for gene-educational attainment interactions using two variables, "Some College" (yes/no) and "Graduated College" (yes/no). Interactions were evaluated using both a 1 degree of freedom (DF) interaction term and a 2DF joint test of genetic and interaction effects. Analyses were performed for systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure. We pursued genome-wide interrogation in Stage 1 studies (N = 117 438) and follow-up on promising variants in Stage 2 studies (N = 293 787) in five ancestry groups. Through combined meta-analyses of Stages 1 and 2, we identified 84 known and 18 novel BP loci at genome-wide significance level (P < 5 × 10). Two novel loci were identified based on the 1DF test of interaction with educational attainment, while the remaining 16 loci were identified through the 2DF joint test of genetic and interaction effects. Ten novel loci were identified in individuals of African ancestry. Several novel loci show strong biological plausibility since they involve physiologic systems implicated in BP regulation. They include genes involved in the central nervous system-adrenal signaling axis (ZDHHC17, CADPS, PIK3C2G), vascular structure and function (GNB3, CDON), and renal function (HAS2 and HAS2-AS1, SLIT3). Collectively, these findings suggest a role of educational attainment or SES in further dissection of the genetic architecture of BP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-020-0719-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7641978PMC
June 2021

Association of HSD17B13 rs72613567:TA with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in Hispanics/Latinos.

Liver Int 2020 04 3;40(4):889-893. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

Department of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, USA.

Introduction: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) disproportionately affects Hispanic/Latinos and rates of NAFLD vary among Hispanics from different background groups. Genetic variants and continental ancestry contribute to NAFLD disparities among Hispanics. We evaluated two newly identified NAFLD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms of HSD17B13, rs72613567:TA and rs62305723:A in Hispanics/Latinos.

Methods: Clinical data, genotypes of variants of interest and estimates of continental ancestry were extracted from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) database, which includes a cohort of 16 415 US Hispanic/Latinos. Surrogate endpoints for NAFLD were suspected NAFLD based on unexplained aminotransferase elevation, continuous ALT levels and FIB-4 scores to estimate hepatic fibrosis.

Results: In all, 9342 participants were included for analysis. The rs72613567:TA allele was found in 15.3% and the rs62305723:A allele was identified in 4.5% of HCHS/SOL participants. rs72613567:TA was less frequent in persons with vs without suspected NAFLD (12.4% vs 15.7%, P < .001) and rs72613567:TA was associated with lower FIB-4 scores (P = .01). For persons with the NAFLD-associated PNPLA3 rs738409:G allele, the presence of rs72613567:TA was associated with a lower rate of suspected NAFD (odds ratio = 0.76, P < .001). rs72613567:TA was less frequent in Hispanic/Latino background groups with higher rates of suspected NAFLD. The rs62305723:A allele was not associated with suspected NAFLD or FIB-4 score.

Conclusion: The rs72613567:TA allele is associated with lower rates of suspected NAFLD and lower FIB-4 scores among Hispanic/Latinos and with lower rates of suspected NAFLD in persons with the PNPLA3 rs738409:G allele. The rs72613567:TA allele contributes to NAFLD disparities among Hispanic/Latino background groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/liv.14387DOI Listing
April 2020

Genome-wide association meta-analyses and fine-mapping elucidate pathways influencing albuminuria.

Nat Commun 2019 09 11;10(1):4130. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

Increased levels of the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) are associated with higher risk of kidney disease progression and cardiovascular events, but underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we conduct trans-ethnic (n = 564,257) and European-ancestry specific meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies of UACR, including ancestry- and diabetes-specific analyses, and identify 68 UACR-associated loci. Genetic correlation analyses and risk score associations in an independent electronic medical records database (n = 192,868) reveal connections with proteinuria, hyperlipidemia, gout, and hypertension. Fine-mapping and trans-Omics analyses with gene expression in 47 tissues and plasma protein levels implicate genes potentially operating through differential expression in kidney (including TGFB1, MUC1, PRKCI, and OAF), and allow coupling of UACR associations to altered plasma OAF concentrations. Knockdown of OAF and PRKCI orthologs in Drosophila nephrocytes reduces albumin endocytosis. Silencing fly PRKCI further impairs slit diaphragm formation. These results generate a priority list of genes and pathways for translational research to reduce albuminuria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-11576-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6739370PMC
September 2019

A catalog of genetic loci associated with kidney function from analyses of a million individuals.

Nat Genet 2019 06 31;51(6):957-972. Epub 2019 May 31.

Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease-Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Clincial Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is responsible for a public health burden with multi-systemic complications. Through trans-ancestry meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and independent replication (n = 1,046,070), we identified 264 associated loci (166 new). Of these, 147 were likely to be relevant for kidney function on the basis of associations with the alternative kidney function marker blood urea nitrogen (n = 416,178). Pathway and enrichment analyses, including mouse models with renal phenotypes, support the kidney as the main target organ. A genetic risk score for lower eGFR was associated with clinically diagnosed CKD in 452,264 independent individuals. Colocalization analyses of associations with eGFR among 783,978 European-ancestry individuals and gene expression across 46 human tissues, including tubulo-interstitial and glomerular kidney compartments, identified 17 genes differentially expressed in kidney. Fine-mapping highlighted missense driver variants in 11 genes and kidney-specific regulatory variants. These results provide a comprehensive priority list of molecular targets for translational research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0407-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6698888PMC
June 2019

A multi-ancestry genome-wide study incorporating gene-smoking interactions identifies multiple new loci for pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure.

Hum Mol Genet 2019 08;28(15):2615-2633

Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.

Elevated blood pressure (BP), a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, is influenced by both genetic and lifestyle factors. Cigarette smoking is one such lifestyle factor. Across five ancestries, we performed a genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP) in 129 913 individuals in stage 1 and follow-up analysis in 480 178 additional individuals in stage 2. We report here 136 loci significantly associated with MAP and/or PP. Of these, 61 were previously published through main-effect analysis of BP traits, 37 were recently reported by us for systolic BP and/or diastolic BP through gene-smoking interaction analysis and 38 were newly identified (P < 5 × 10-8, false discovery rate < 0.05). We also identified nine new signals near known loci. Of the 136 loci, 8 showed significant interaction with smoking status. They include CSMD1 previously reported for insulin resistance and BP in the spontaneously hypertensive rats. Many of the 38 new loci show biologic plausibility for a role in BP regulation. SLC26A7 encodes a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger expressed in the renal outer medullary collecting duct. AVPR1A is widely expressed, including in vascular smooth muscle cells, kidney, myocardium and brain. FHAD1 is a long non-coding RNA overexpressed in heart failure. TMEM51 was associated with contractile function in cardiomyocytes. CASP9 plays a central role in cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Identified only in African ancestry were 30 novel loci. Our findings highlight the value of multi-ancestry investigations, particularly in studies of interaction with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences may contribute to novel findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddz070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6644157PMC
August 2019

Multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of 387,272 individuals identifies new loci associated with serum lipids.

Nat Genet 2019 04 29;51(4):636-648. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.

The concentrations of high- and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are influenced by smoking, but it is unknown whether genetic associations with lipids may be modified by smoking. We conducted a multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study in 133,805 individuals with follow-up in an additional 253,467 individuals. Combined meta-analyses identified 13 new loci associated with lipids, some of which were detected only because association differed by smoking status. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of including diverse populations, particularly in studies of interactions with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences by ancestry may contribute to novel findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0378-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6467258PMC
April 2019

American Ancestry Is a Risk Factor for Suspected Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Hispanic/Latino Adults.

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2019 10 8;17(11):2301-2309. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Division of Hepatology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois.

Background & Aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) disproportionally affects Hispanic/Latino populations. However, the magnitude varies among Hispanic/Latino ethnic groups. We investigated the mechanisms of these disparities.

Methods: We examined associations of NAFLD-associated genetic variants and continental ancestry with suspected NAFLD, levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and liver fibrosis using data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos-a population-based study of Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States. We evaluated data from 16,415 Hispanic/Latino adults in 4 cities from 2008 through 2011. Subjects suspected of having NAFLD or liver fibrosis were identified based on unexplained increases in levels of aminotransferases and FIB-4 score, respectively.

Results: Among the 9342 participants with available genetic and aminotransferase data, the PNPLA3 G allele (odds ratio [OR], 1.53; 95% CI, 1.41-1.66), TM6SF2 T allele (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.20-1.67), and PPP1R3B G allele (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.06-1.28) were associated with suspected NAFLD. PNPLA3 G was also associated with increased levels of ALT, except in participants with Dominican and South American backgrounds, and with liver fibrosis. The frequency of PNPLA3 G was high (41%) and TM6SF2 T (5%) was low in Hispanic/Latinos. PNPLA3 G frequency differed among Hispanic background groups with the highest proportion in Mexicans (52%) and the lowest proportion in Dominicans (23%). After adjustment for demographic, clinical, and behavioral factors, as well as PNPLA3 G, TM6SF2 T, and PPP1R3B G, American ancestry had a positive association with level of ALT (r = 6.61%; P < .001), whereas African (r = -3.84%; P < .001) and European (r = -4.31%; P < .001) ancestry were inversely associated with level of ALT.

Conclusions: American ancestry and PNPLA3 G are independent predictors of ALT levels in US Hispanic/Latinos and may in part explain NAFLD disparities in US Hispanic/Latinos.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2019.02.007DOI Listing
October 2019

Multiancestry Genome-Wide Association Study of Lipid Levels Incorporating Gene-Alcohol Interactions.

Am J Epidemiol 2019 06;188(6):1033-1054

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

A person's lipid profile is influenced by genetic variants and alcohol consumption, but the contribution of interactions between these exposures has not been studied. We therefore incorporated gene-alcohol interactions into a multiancestry genome-wide association study of levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. We included 45 studies in stage 1 (genome-wide discovery) and 66 studies in stage 2 (focused follow-up), for a total of 394,584 individuals from 5 ancestry groups. Analyses covered the period July 2014-November 2017. Genetic main effects and interaction effects were jointly assessed by means of a 2-degrees-of-freedom (df) test, and a 1-df test was used to assess the interaction effects alone. Variants at 495 loci were at least suggestively associated (P < 1 × 10-6) with lipid levels in stage 1 and were evaluated in stage 2, followed by combined analyses of stage 1 and stage 2. In the combined analysis of stages 1 and 2, a total of 147 independent loci were associated with lipid levels at P < 5 × 10-8 using 2-df tests, of which 18 were novel. No genome-wide-significant associations were found testing the interaction effect alone. The novel loci included several genes (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 5 (PCSK5), vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGFB), and apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 1 (APOBEC1) complementation factor (A1CF)) that have a putative role in lipid metabolism on the basis of existing evidence from cellular and experimental models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwz005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6545280PMC
June 2019

White Paper: Pathways to Progress in Newborn Screening for Sickle Cell Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa.

J Trop Dis Public Health 2018 10;6(2):260. Epub 2018 Jul 10.

Department of Public Health Sciences, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL, USA.

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is among the most common single-gene diseases in the world but evidence-based comprehensive health care has not been implemented where the highest prevalence of SCD occurs, in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It represents an urgent health burden, both in terms of mortality and morbidity with an estimated mortality of 8-16% in children under 5 years in SSA. Addressing the high mortality of SCD in SSA and for effective management of SCD, newborn screening (NBS) should be incorporated with prevention of infections (including pneumococcal septicaemia and malaria), parental education and support at all levels of healthcare provision to enable timely recognition. The NBS working group of the Africa Sickle Cell Research Network (AfroSickleNet) collaboration surveyed current projects in NBS in SSA, and current conditions that hinder more widespread implementation of NBS for SCD. Solutions based on new point-of-care testing technology to disseminate education, and implementation science approaches that leverage existing resources are proposed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2329-891X.1000260DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6261323PMC
July 2018

Sickle Cell Disease Clinical Trials and Phenotypes.

J Trop Dis Public Health 2018 8;6(2):259. Epub 2018 Apr 8.

Department of Public Health Sciences, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL, USA.

Sickle cell disease, one of the world's most common genetic disorders is prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. The trans-Atlantic slave trade accounted for the gene movement from Africa to the Caribbean and United States of America and lately, migration has resulted in the introduction of the gene to the United Kingdom and other parts of Europe. Different haplotypes exist, however the differences in these haplotypes are not sufficient to explain the different clinical variations within the same region or different settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2329-891X.1000259DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6219473PMC
April 2018

Combined linkage and association analysis identifies rare and low frequency variants for blood pressure at 1q31.

Eur J Hum Genet 2019 02 27;27(2):269-277. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA.

High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and is more prevalent in African Americans as compared to other US groups. Although large, population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 300 common polymorphisms modulating inter-individual BP variation, largely in European ancestry subjects, most of them do not localize to regions previously identified through family-based linkage studies. This discrepancy has remained unexplained despite the statistical power differences between current GWAS and prior linkage studies. To address this issue, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis of BP traits in African-American families from the Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP) and genotyped on the Illumina Human Exome BeadChip v1.1. We identified a genomic region on chromosome 1q31 with LOD score 3.8 for pulse pressure (PP), a region we previously implicated in DBP studies of European ancestry families. Although no reported GWAS variants map to this region, combined linkage and association analysis of PP identified 81 rare and low frequency exonic variants accounting for the linkage evidence. Replication analysis in eight independent African ancestry cohorts (N = 16,968) supports this specific association with PP (P = 0.0509). Additional association and network analyses identified multiple potential candidate genes in this region expressed in multiple tissues and with a strong biological support for a role in BP. In conclusion, multiple genes and rare variants on 1q31 contribute to PP variation. Beyond producing new insights into PP, we demonstrate how family-based linkage and association studies can implicate specific rare and low frequency variants for complex traits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-018-0277-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6336803PMC
February 2019

Novel genetic associations for blood pressure identified via gene-alcohol interaction in up to 570K individuals across multiple ancestries.

PLoS One 2018 18;13(6):e0198166. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.

Heavy alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for hypertension; the mechanism by which alcohol consumption impact blood pressure (BP) regulation remains unknown. We hypothesized that a genome-wide association study accounting for gene-alcohol consumption interaction for BP might identify additional BP loci and contribute to the understanding of alcohol-related BP regulation. We conducted a large two-stage investigation incorporating joint testing of main genetic effects and single nucleotide variant (SNV)-alcohol consumption interactions. In Stage 1, genome-wide discovery meta-analyses in ≈131K individuals across several ancestry groups yielded 3,514 SNVs (245 loci) with suggestive evidence of association (P < 1.0 x 10-5). In Stage 2, these SNVs were tested for independent external replication in ≈440K individuals across multiple ancestries. We identified and replicated (at Bonferroni correction threshold) five novel BP loci (380 SNVs in 21 genes) and 49 previously reported BP loci (2,159 SNVs in 109 genes) in European ancestry, and in multi-ancestry meta-analyses (P < 5.0 x 10-8). For African ancestry samples, we detected 18 potentially novel BP loci (P < 5.0 x 10-8) in Stage 1 that warrant further replication. Additionally, correlated meta-analysis identified eight novel BP loci (11 genes). Several genes in these loci (e.g., PINX1, GATA4, BLK, FTO and GABBR2) have been previously reported to be associated with alcohol consumption. These findings provide insights into the role of alcohol consumption in the genetic architecture of hypertension.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0198166PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6005576PMC
January 2019

Ambulatory blood pressure threshold for black Africans: more questions than answers.

J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) 2018 05 27;20(5):847-849. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Centers for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Population Science, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jch.13287DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5992076PMC
May 2018

Control procedures and estimators of the false discovery rate and their application in low-dimensional settings: an empirical investigation.

BMC Bioinformatics 2018 03 2;19(1):78. Epub 2018 Mar 2.

Institute of Genetic Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center, University of Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 49, 79106, Freiburg, Germany.

Background: When many (up to millions) of statistical tests are conducted in discovery set analyses such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS), approaches controlling family-wise error rate (FWER) or false discovery rate (FDR) are required to reduce the number of false positive decisions. Some methods were specifically developed in the context of high-dimensional settings and partially rely on the estimation of the proportion of true null hypotheses. However, these approaches are also applied in low-dimensional settings such as replication set analyses that might be restricted to a small number of specific hypotheses. The aim of this study was to compare different approaches in low-dimensional settings using (a) real data from the CKDGen Consortium and (b) a simulation study.

Results: In both application and simulation FWER approaches were less powerful compared to FDR control methods, whether a larger number of hypotheses were tested or not. Most powerful was the q-value method. However, the specificity of this method to maintain true null hypotheses was especially decreased when the number of tested hypotheses was small. In this low-dimensional situation, estimation of the proportion of true null hypotheses was biased.

Conclusions: The results highlight the importance of a sizeable data set for a reliable estimation of the proportion of true null hypotheses. Consequently, methods relying on this estimation should only be applied in high-dimensional settings. Furthermore, if the focus lies on testing of a small number of hypotheses such as in replication settings, FWER methods rather than FDR methods should be preferred to maintain high specificity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12859-018-2081-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5833079PMC
March 2018

A Large-Scale Multi-ancestry Genome-wide Study Accounting for Smoking Behavior Identifies Multiple Significant Loci for Blood Pressure.

Am J Hum Genet 2018 03 15;102(3):375-400. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Health Disparities Research Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.

Genome-wide association analysis advanced understanding of blood pressure (BP), a major risk factor for vascular conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke. Accounting for smoking behavior may help identify BP loci and extend our knowledge of its genetic architecture. We performed genome-wide association meta-analyses of systolic and diastolic BP incorporating gene-smoking interactions in 610,091 individuals. Stage 1 analysis examined ∼18.8 million SNPs and small insertion/deletion variants in 129,913 individuals from four ancestries (European, African, Asian, and Hispanic) with follow-up analysis of promising variants in 480,178 additional individuals from five ancestries. We identified 15 loci that were genome-wide significant (p < 5 × 10) in stage 1 and formally replicated in stage 2. A combined stage 1 and 2 meta-analysis identified 66 additional genome-wide significant loci (13, 35, and 18 loci in European, African, and trans-ancestry, respectively). A total of 56 known BP loci were also identified by our results (p < 5 × 10). Of the newly identified loci, ten showed significant interaction with smoking status, but none of them were replicated in stage 2. Several loci were identified in African ancestry, highlighting the importance of genetic studies in diverse populations. The identified loci show strong evidence for regulatory features and support shared pathophysiology with cardiometabolic and addiction traits. They also highlight a role in BP regulation for biological candidates such as modulators of vascular structure and function (CDKN1B, BCAR1-CFDP1, PXDN, EEA1), ciliopathies (SDCCAG8, RPGRIP1L), telomere maintenance (TNKS, PINX1, AKTIP), and central dopaminergic signaling (MSRA, EBF2).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.01.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5985266PMC
March 2018

Circadian blood pressure variation amongst people with chronic kidney diseases: A pilot study in Ibadan.

Niger Postgrad Med J 2017 Jul-Sep;24(3):131-136

Department of Public Health Sciences, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL, USA.

Background: Circadian variation in blood pressure (BP) has been shown to determine cardiovascular events in people with chronic kidney diseases (CKDs). Studies aimed at elucidating the relationship between diurnal variation in BP and cardiovascular disease have yielded conflicting results, and very few of these studies have been conducted on CKD patients in Sub-Saharan Africa, hence the need for this study.

Subjects And Methods: Eighty-five adult participants comprising 54 patients with CKD (36 males and 18 females) and 31 hypertensive patients (16 males and 15 females) free of CKD were recruited for 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring and cardiovascular risk factor assessment.

Results: Patients with CKD had a higher mean clinic systolic BP (159.8 ± 28.6 vs. 147.9 ± 19.0 mmHg, P = 0.049) and reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (19.2 ± 18.6 vs. 106.2 ± 30.6, P < 0.0001) when compared with hypertensives free of CKD. The mean 24 h ambulatory SBP (135.9 ± 28.5 vs. 120.3 ± 11.8 mmHg, P = 0.007), diastolic BP (82.6 ± 18.1 vs. 74.8 ± 9.0 mmHg, P = 0.034) and mean arterial pressure (100.9 ± 21.2 vs. 90.6 ± 10.2 mmHg, P = 0.018) were higher amongst CKD patients. Compared with hypertensive without CKD, daytime hypertension (58.9% vs. 21.4, P = 0.001), nocturnal hypertension (80.4% vs. 50.0%, P = 0.004) and non-dippers (92.0% vs. 73.1%, P = 0.026) were commoner in people with CKD. White coat effect was more common amongst hypertensives without CKD (74.2% vs. 38.0%, P = 0.002). The mean left atrial diameter and left ventricular mass index were higher in CKD group.

Conclusion: This study highlights the high prevalence of varied phenotypes in circadian rhythm amongst CKD patients. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring may be useful for early risk stratification of CKD patients. Large longitudinal study is needed to assess the prognostic implication of the findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/npmj.npmj_73_17DOI Listing
April 2019

Associations of α-thalassemia and BCL11A with stroke in Nigerian, United States, and United Kingdom sickle cell anemia cohorts.

Blood Adv 2017 Apr;1(11):693-698

Department of Public Health Sciences, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL USA.

Alpha-thalassemia and the rs1427407 T allele are commonly observed in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients and are associated with reduced hemolysis and higher hemoglobin F levels, respectively. We investigated whether a high-risk genetic profile, defined as SCA patients who did not inherit either α-thalassemia or the rs1427407 T allele, had stronger associations with clinical and laboratory variables than the individual genetic components in the University of Ibadan cohort (n=249). We then replicated our findings in SCA cohorts from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)(n=260) and Walk-Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension and Sickle cell disease with Sildenafil Therapy (Walk-PHaSST)(n=387). High-risk was associated with higher reticulocytes (15.0% vs. 7.8%, =0.08) and stroke history (6% vs. 1%, =0.02) than standard risk patients and these associations were more significant than the individual genetic components in the University of Ibadan cohort. These findings were replicated in high-risk patients from UIC and Walk-PHaSST for reticulocytes (UIC: 13.5% vs. 11.8%, =0.03; Walk-PHaSST: 9.6% vs. 8.2%, =0.0003) and stroke history (UIC: 32% vs. 22%, =0.07; Walk-PHaSST: 14% vs. 7%, =0.01). On combined analysis, high-risk had strong associations with increased markers of hemolysis (hemoglobin β= -0.29, 95%CI: -0.50 to -0.09; =0.006; reticulocyte% β=2.29, 95%CI: 1.31 to 3.25; =1x10) and stroke history (OR=2.0, 95%CI: 1.3 to 3.0; =0.0002), but no association with frequent vaso-occlusive crises (≥3/year). A high-risk genetic profile is associated with increased hemolysis and stroke history in three independent cohorts. This profile may help identify patients to prioritize for hydroxyurea and for closer monitoring strategies for stroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2017005231DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5580997PMC
April 2017

Single-trait and multi-trait genome-wide association analyses identify novel loci for blood pressure in African-ancestry populations.

PLoS Genet 2017 May 12;13(5):e1006728. Epub 2017 May 12.

Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America.

Hypertension is a leading cause of global disease, mortality, and disability. While individuals of African descent suffer a disproportionate burden of hypertension and its complications, they have been underrepresented in genetic studies. To identify novel susceptibility loci for blood pressure and hypertension in people of African ancestry, we performed both single and multiple-trait genome-wide association analyses. We analyzed 21 genome-wide association studies comprised of 31,968 individuals of African ancestry, and validated our results with additional 54,395 individuals from multi-ethnic studies. These analyses identified nine loci with eleven independent variants which reached genome-wide significance (P < 1.25×10-8) for either systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hypertension, or for combined traits. Single-trait analyses identified two loci (TARID/TCF21 and LLPH/TMBIM4) and multiple-trait analyses identified one novel locus (FRMD3) for blood pressure. At these three loci, as well as at GRP20/CDH17, associated variants had alleles common only in African-ancestry populations. Functional annotation showed enrichment for genes expressed in immune and kidney cells, as well as in heart and vascular cells/tissues. Experiments driven by these findings and using angiotensin-II induced hypertension in mice showed altered kidney mRNA expression of six genes, suggesting their potential role in hypertension. Our study provides new evidence for genes related to hypertension susceptibility, and the need to study African-ancestry populations in order to identify biologic factors contributing to hypertension.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006728DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5446189PMC
May 2017

Genome-wide meta-analysis of 241,258 adults accounting for smoking behaviour identifies novel loci for obesity traits.

Nat Commun 2017 04 26;8:14977. Epub 2017 Apr 26.

Centre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia.

Few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for environmental exposures, like smoking, potentially impacting the overall trait variance when investigating the genetic contribution to obesity-related traits. Here, we use GWAS data from 51,080 current smokers and 190,178 nonsmokers (87% European descent) to identify loci influencing BMI and central adiposity, measured as waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio both adjusted for BMI. We identify 23 novel genetic loci, and 9 loci with convincing evidence of gene-smoking interaction (GxSMK) on obesity-related traits. We show consistent direction of effect for all identified loci and significance for 18 novel and for 5 interaction loci in an independent study sample. These loci highlight novel biological functions, including response to oxidative stress, addictive behaviour, and regulatory functions emphasizing the importance of accounting for environment in genetic analyses. Our results suggest that tobacco smoking may alter the genetic susceptibility to overall adiposity and body fat distribution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14977DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5414044PMC
April 2017

Discovery and fine-mapping of adiposity loci using high density imputation of genome-wide association studies in individuals of African ancestry: African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium.

PLoS Genet 2017 Apr 21;13(4):e1006719. Epub 2017 Apr 21.

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, United States of America.

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >300 loci associated with measures of adiposity including body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), but few have been identified through screening of the African ancestry genomes. We performed large scale meta-analyses and replications in up to 52,895 individuals for BMI and up to 23,095 individuals for WHRadjBMI from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC) using 1000 Genomes phase 1 imputed GWAS to improve coverage of both common and low frequency variants in the low linkage disequilibrium African ancestry genomes. In the sex-combined analyses, we identified one novel locus (TCF7L2/HABP2) for WHRadjBMI and eight previously established loci at P < 5×10-8: seven for BMI, and one for WHRadjBMI in African ancestry individuals. An additional novel locus (SPRYD7/DLEU2) was identified for WHRadjBMI when combined with European GWAS. In the sex-stratified analyses, we identified three novel loci for BMI (INTS10/LPL and MLC1 in men, IRX4/IRX2 in women) and four for WHRadjBMI (SSX2IP, CASC8, PDE3B and ZDHHC1/HSD11B2 in women) in individuals of African ancestry or both African and European ancestry. For four of the novel variants, the minor allele frequency was low (<5%). In the trans-ethnic fine mapping of 47 BMI loci and 27 WHRadjBMI loci that were locus-wide significant (P < 0.05 adjusted for effective number of variants per locus) from the African ancestry sex-combined and sex-stratified analyses, 26 BMI loci and 17 WHRadjBMI loci contained ≤ 20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% posterior probability of driving the associations. The lead variants in 13 of these loci had a high probability of being causal. As compared to our previous HapMap imputed GWAS for BMI and WHRadjBMI including up to 71,412 and 27,350 African ancestry individuals, respectively, our results suggest that 1000 Genomes imputation showed modest improvement in identifying GWAS loci including low frequency variants. Trans-ethnic meta-analyses further improved fine mapping of putative causal variants in loci shared between the African and European ancestry populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006719DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5419579PMC
April 2017

Rare coding variants associated with blood pressure variation in 15 914 individuals of African ancestry.

J Hypertens 2017 07;35(7):1381-1389

aMcKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine bPredoctoral Training Program in Human Genetics and Molecular Biology, McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland cBrown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas dCenter for Research on Genomics and Global Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland eDepartment of Public Health Sciences, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois fDepartment of Epidemiology gInstitute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan hDivision of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA iDepartment of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria jHuman Genetics Center, Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA kDepartment of Specialties of Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland.

Objectives: Hypertension is a major risk factor for all cardiovascular diseases, especially among African Americans. This study focuses on identifying specific blood pressure (BP) genes using 15 914 individuals of African ancestry from eight cohorts (Africa America Diabetes Mellitus, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, Coronary Artery Risk Development in young Adults, Genetics Network, Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy, Howard University Family Study, Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network, and Loyola University Chicago Cohort) to further genetic findings in this population which has generally been underrepresented in BP studies.

Methods: We genotyped and performed various single variant and gene-based exome-wide analyses on 15 914 individuals on the Illumina HumanExome Beadchip v1.0 or v1.1 to test association with SBP and DBP long-term average residuals that were adjusted for age, age-squared, sex, and BMI.

Results: We identified rare variants affecting SBP and DBP in 10 genes: AFF1, GAPDHS, SLC28A3, COL6A1, CRYBA2, KRBA1, SEL1L3, YOD1, CCDC13, and QSOX1. Prior experimental evidence for six of these 10 candidate genes supports their involvement in cardiovascular mechanisms, corroborating their potential roles in BP regulation.

Conclusion: Although our results require replication or validation due to their low numbers of carriers, and an ethnicity-specific genotyping array may be more informative, this study, which has identified several candidate genes in this population most susceptible to hypertension, presents one of the largest African-ancestry BP studies to date and the largest including analysis of rare variants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000001319DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5451310PMC
July 2017

Association of polymorphisms in the aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption pathway with blood pressure among Hispanics.

BMC Proc 2016 18;10(Suppl 7):343-348. Epub 2016 Oct 18.

Department of Public Health Sciences, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL 60153 USA.

Background: Whereas genome-wide association study (GWAS) has proven to be an important tool for discovery of variants influencing many human diseases and traits, unfortunately its performance has not been much of all-around success for some complex conditions, for example, hypertension. Because some of the existing effective pharmacotherapeutic agents act by targeting known biological pathways, pathway-based analytical approaches could lead to more success in discovery of disease-associated variants. The objective of the present study was to identify functional variants associated with blood pressure in the aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption pathway using the simulated and real blood pressure phenotypes provided for Genetic Analysis Workshop 19.

Methods: The present analysis included 1942 samples with exome sequencing data and for whom blood pressure phenotypes were available. Because only odd-numbered autosomes were available, we restricted analysis to 127 quality-controlled single-nucleotide polymorphisms from the aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption pathway. We performed pathway-based association analysis using appropriate regression models for single variant, haplotype and epistasis association analyses. To account for multiple comparisons, statistical significance was empirically derived by permutation procedure and Bonferroni correction.

Results: The topmost pathway-based association signals were observed in gene for diastolic blood pressure (DBP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in both real and simulated data. The associations remained significant ( <0.05) after multiple testing corrections for the number of genes. Similarly, the pathway-based 2-locus epistasis analysis indicated significant interactions between and for SBP and MAP; and for DBP; and for hypertension in the real data set. We also observed significant within-gene interactions in for SBP, DBP, and hypertension in the simulated data set.

Conclusion: The findings from this study show that pathway-based analytical approach targeting known biological pathways can be useful in identification of disease-associated variants that are otherwise undetectable by GWAS. The approach takes advantage of the assumption of nonindependence of variants within and across pathway genes which leads to reduced penalty of multiple testing and thus less-stringent statistical significance threshold.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12919-016-0054-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5133472PMC
October 2016
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