Publications by authors named "Balveen Singh"

3 Publications

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Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome: Multi-Organ Involvement Highlighting Its Diverse Clinical Spectrum in Two Adult Cases.

Cureus 2020 Jul 26;12(7):e9402. Epub 2020 Jul 26.

Neurology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, USA.

There is an assortment of disorders that have multisystem involvement. Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome, a rare autosomal dominant disease, falls in that category. VHL syndrome is associated with the formation of benign and malignant tumors in the central nervous system (CNS), adrenal gland, kidney, and eyes. In this report, we present two unusual cases of VHL syndrome presenting with multisystem engagement. The first case is of a 27-year-old male exhibiting multiple manifestations, which included hemangioblastoma of the spine, pheochromocytoma, pancreatic cyst, and retinal hemangioblastoma. The second case pertains to a 25-year-old male with various presentations ranging from retinal hemangioblastoma and pancreatitis to spinal and cerebellar hemangioblastoma. These cases emphasize the value of radiologic imaging and genetic assessment early in life when the presentation of the disease is in its preliminary stage. When an individual presents with a condition characterized by unexplained multifarious organ involvement of CNS, adrenal glands, and kidneys in the span of a few years, a differential diagnosis of VHL syndrome should be considered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.9402DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7449644PMC
July 2020

2019-NCoV: What Every Neurologist Should Know?

Ann Indian Acad Neurol 2020 Apr 17;23(Suppl 1):S28-S32. Epub 2020 Apr 17.

Department of Neurology, Dayanand Medical College, Ludhiana, Punjab, India.

The 2019 novel Corona Virus pandemic beginning from Wuhan, China primarily affects the respiratory tract but its has impacted clinical practice across a range of specialities including neurology. We review the bearing of the 2019 NCoV infection on neurological practice. Neurological manifestations are less common than respiratory manifestations, yet conspicuous, affecting nearly over a third of hospitalized individuals. These may be classified in to early - headache, dizziness, hyposmia and hypogeusia and late - encephalopathy. Rarely but surely, a very small proportion of infected individuals might present with stroke. Certain neurological conditions, including cerebrovascular disease in both China and Italy and dementia in Italy predispose to infection and more severe manifestations, requiring intensive care unit admission. There is no convincing evidence that the manifestations, course and outcome of various neurological disorders is impacted by 2019 nCoV infection. Concerns of an increased risk of febrile seizures offset by a reduced frequency of infection in the paediatric age group. Individuals with multiple sclerosis might potentially experience both true and pseudorelapses. Besides a direct effect, 2019 nCoV has tremendously affected neurological care by disrupting the continuity of care and the availability of neurological medicines worldwide. Neurologists should respond to this challenge by developing and sustaining innovative methods of providing care as well as alerting the society at large to adopt measures to contain the spread of 2019 nCoV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/aian.AIAN_210_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7213032PMC
April 2020

Thrombosed right coronary artery aneurysm presenting as a myocardial mass.

J Am Soc Echocardiogr 2004 Dec;17(12):1319-22

Division of Cardiology, North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY 11040, USA.

A coronary artery aneurysm is defined as coronary dilatation that exceeds the diameter of normal adjacent artery segments, or is 1.5 times the diameter of the largest coronary artery. Coronary artery aneurysms are rare with an incidence of between 1.5% to 5%. The aneurysm is caused by destruction of the vessel media, thinning of the arterial wall, increased wall stress, and progressive dilatation of a segment of the coronary artery. The most common cause is atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. These aneurysms occasionally rupture but more commonly develop thrombus and hematoma leading to the appearance of the presence of an intramyocardial mass. We present the case of a 60-year-old man with hypertension who presented with a mass that was identified initially by transthoracic echocardiography in the setting of an inferior wall myocardial infarction, which was later recognized to be a thrombosed right coronary artery aneurysm.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.echo.2004.07.004DOI Listing
December 2004
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