Publications by authors named "Baker Habeeb"

5 Publications

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FGFR Pathway Inhibition in Gastric Cancer: The Golden Era of an Old Target?

Life (Basel) 2022 Jan 7;12(1). Epub 2022 Jan 7.

Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale del Mare, 80147 Naples, Italy.

Gastric cancer (GC) is the third leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. The majority of patients are diagnosed at an advanced/metastatic stage of disease due to a lack of specific symptoms and lack of screening programs, especially in Western countries. Thus, despite the improvement in GC therapeutic opportunities, the survival is disappointing, and the definition of the optimal treatment is still an unmet need. Novel diagnostic techniques were developed in clinical trials in order to characterize the genetic profile of GCs and new potential molecular pathways, such as the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) pathway, were identified in order to improve patient's survival by using target therapies. The aim of this review is to summarize the role and the impact of FGFR signaling in GC and to provide an overview regarding the potential effectiveness of anti-FGFR agents in GC treatment in the context of precision medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/life12010081DOI Listing
January 2022

Knowledge, Practice, and Attitudes of Physicians in Low- and Middle-Income Countries on Fertility and Pregnancy-Related Issues in Young Women With Breast Cancer.

JCO Glob Oncol 2022 Jan;8:e2100153

Department of Medical Oncology, U.O. Clinica di Oncologia Medica, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genova, Italy.

Purpose: Fertility and pregnancy-related issues are highly relevant for young (≤ 40 years) patients with breast cancer. Limited evidence exists on knowledge, practice, and attitudes of physicians from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) regarding these issues.

Methods: A 19-item questionnaire adapted from an international survey exploring issues about fertility preservation and pregnancy after breast cancer was sent by e-mail between November 2019 and January 2020 to physicians from LMICs involved in breast cancer care. Descriptive analyses were performed.

Results: A total of 288 physicians from Asia, Africa, America, and Europe completed the survey. Median age was 38 years. Responders were mainly medical oncologists (44.4%) working in an academic setting (46.9%). Among responders, 40.2% and 53.8% reported having never consulted the available international guidelines on fertility preservation and pregnancy after breast cancer, respectively. 25.0%, 19.1%, and 24.3% of responders answered to be not at all knowledgeable about embryo, oocyte, or ovarian tissue cryopreservation, respectively; 29.2%, 23.6%, and 31.3% declared that embryo, oocyte, and ovarian tissue cryopreservation were not available in their countries, respectively. 57.6% of responders disagreed or were neutral on the statement that controlled ovarian stimulation can be considered safe in patients with breast cancer. 49.7% and 58.6% of responders agreed or were neutral on the statement that pregnancy in breast cancer survivors may increase the risk of recurrence overall or only in those with hormone receptor-positive disease, respectively.

Conclusion: This survey showed suboptimal knowledge, practice, and attitudes of physicians from LMICs on fertility preservation and pregnancy after treatment completion in young women with breast cancer. Increasing awareness and education on these aspects are needed to improve adherence to available guidelines and to promote patients' oncofertility counseling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/GO.21.00153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8769103PMC
January 2022

The Emerging Role of Liquid Biopsy in Gastric Cancer.

J Clin Med 2021 May 13;10(10). Epub 2021 May 13.

School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa 1560, Ethiopia.

(1) Background: Liquid biopsy (LB) is a novel diagnostic method with the potential of revolutionizing the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of several solid tumors. The present paper aims to summarize the current knowledge and explore future possibilities of LB in the management of metastatic gastric cancer. (2) Methods: This narrative review examined the most recent literature on the use of LB-based techniques in metastatic gastric cancer and the current LB-related clinical trial landscape. (3) Results: In gastric cancer, the detection of circulating cancer cells (CTCs) has been recognized to have a prognostic role in all the disease stages. In the setting of localized disease, cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) qualitative and quantitative detection have the potential to inform on the risk of cancer recurrence and metastatic dissemination. In addition, gastric cancer-released exosomes may play an essential part in metastasis formation. In the metastatic setting, the levels of cfDNA show a positive correlation with tumor burden. There is evidence that circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) in the blood of metastatic patients is an independent prognostic factor for shorter overall survival. Gastric cancer-derived exosomal microRNAs or clonal mutations and copy number variations detectable in ctDNA may contribute resistance to chemotherapy or targeted therapies, respectively. There is conflicting and limited data on CTC-based PD-L1 verification and cfDNA-based Epstein-Barr virus detection to predict or monitor immunotherapy responses. (4) Conclusions: Although preliminary studies analyzing LBs in patients with advanced gastric cancer appear promising, more research is required to obtain better insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to systemic therapies. Moreover, validation and standardization of LB methods are crucial before introducing them in clinical practice. The feasibility of repeatable, minimally invasive sampling opens up the possibility of selecting or dynamically changing therapies based on prognostic risk or predictive biomarkers, such as resistance markers. Research is warranted to exploit a possible transforming area of cancer care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10102108DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8153353PMC
May 2021

The Potential of PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling as a Druggable Target for Endometrial and Ovarian Carcinomas.

Curr Drug Targets 2020 ;21(10):946-961

Department of Clinical Oncology, Bannu Institute Nuclear Medicine Oncology and Radiotherapy, Bannu, Pakistan.

Aims: In this narrative review, we summarize the role and significance of PI3K-AKTmTOR (PAM) pathway in ovarian and endometrial cancers, providing the most recent and relevant literature on the topic and addressing options for targeting PAM along with future perspectives of drug development.

Background: Alterations of the PAM-pathway are common in both endometrial and ovarian cancers, and are described in specific histology-defined subtypes. PAM seems to be involved in critical steps of endometrial and ovarian carcinogenesis, often mechanistically involved in the acquisition of a phenotype of treatment resistance, which could be targetable. However, early clinical trials with PAMinhibitors (PAMi) have provided disappointing results, particularly when non isoform-specific inhibitors were tested in unselected populations, accompanied by an adverse safety profile. Since then, more encouraging observations have been collected when targeting specific isoforms of PAM proteins with more selective drugs, resulting in encouraging activity and more manageable toxicity.

Conclusion: Although the rationale of inhibiting the PAM-pathway has been demonstrated in several promising preclinical studies, no Phase III clinical trial is available to demonstrate a significant benefit of PAM-inhibitors. A way to manage targeted agents is to tailor their use to particular subpopulations most likely to obtain a considerable benefit, namely pursuing an individualized, precision-medicine approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1389450120666191120123612DOI Listing
July 2021

Adiponectin supports cell survival in glucose deprivation through enhancement of autophagic response in colorectal cancer cells.

Cancer Sci 2011 May 15;102(5):999-1006. Epub 2011 Mar 15.

Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Adiponectin is known to have suppressive effects on tumor growth and is thought to be a key molecule in the positive correlation between obesity and cancer. However, the detailed mechanisms regulating tumor cell activity have not been elucidated. In this study, we found that both full-length (f-Ad) and globular adiponectin (g-Ad) inhibited cell growth in colon cancer cell lines in glucose-containing medium, whereas it supported cell survival in glucose-deprived medium, with an increase in AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 expression. The latter effect of adiponectin in glucose deprivation was significantly inhibited by adding autophagy inhibitors, chloroquine, 3-methyl adenine or a combination of pepstatin A and E-64d, suggesting that the effect of supporting cell growth was dependent, at least in part, on the induction of autophagy. The enhancement of autophagy was confirmed morphologically using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) fusion proteins under a fluorescence microscope using stably transfected DLD-1 cells expressing GFP-LC3. Western blot analysis revealed that adiponectin increased the expression of LC3-1, LC3-2, phosphorylated AMPKα and PPARα but decreased that of phosphorylated mTOR, insulin like growth factor (IGF)-1, phosphorylated serine/threonine kinase (Akt) and phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in glucose-deprived medium. We conclude that adiponectin supports cell survival in glucose deprivation through enhancement of the autophagic machinery by AMPKα and PPARα activation and IGF-1/PI3k/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibition. The bimodal effects of adiponectin are thought to be clinically important in the pathophysiology of tumor development and progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1349-7006.2011.01902.xDOI Listing
May 2011
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