Publications by authors named "Baimei Liu"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ultra-strong bio-glue from genetically engineered polypeptides.

Nat Commun 2021 06 14;12(1):3613. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

The development of biomedical glues is an important, yet challenging task as seemingly mutually exclusive properties need to be combined in one material, i.e. strong adhesion and adaption to remodeling processes in healing tissue. Here, we report a biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based adhesive with high adhesion strengths. The maximum strength reaches 16.5 ± 2.2 MPa on hard substrates, which is comparable to that of commercial cyanoacrylate superglue and higher than other protein-based adhesives by at least one order of magnitude. Moreover, the strong adhesion on soft tissues qualifies the adhesive as biomedical glue outperforming some commercial products. Robust mechanical properties are realized without covalent bond formation during the adhesion process. A complex consisting of cationic supercharged polypeptides and anionic aromatic surfactants with lysine to surfactant molar ratio of 1:0.9 is driven by multiple supramolecular interactions enabling such strong adhesion. We demonstrate the glue's robust performance in vitro and in vivo for cosmetic and hemostasis applications and accelerated wound healing by comparison to surgical wound closures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-23117-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8203747PMC
June 2021

The effects of pressure intervention on wound healing and scar formation in a Bama minipig model.

Burns 2019 03 28;45(2):413-422. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Institute of Applied Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, No. 79 Yingze Street, Taiyuan 030024, China; Shanxi Key Laboratory of Material Strength & Structural Impact, College of Mechanics, Taiyuan University of Technology, No. 79 Yingze Street, Taiyuan 030024, China; National Demonstration Center for Experimental Mechanics Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, No. 79 Yingze Street, Taiyuan 030024, China. Electronic address:

Pressure therapy has been widely used in clinical practice for the prevention or treatment of hypertrophic scars resulted from aberrations in wound healing. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of this process are only partially understood. In the present study, we established a Bama minipig model to observe the effect of pressure intervention on wound healing and scar formation. Transcriptome sequencing was performed to analyze the gene expression profiles in the injured and pressure-treated tissues. Furthermore, expression of the critical factors associated with IGF-1/IGF-1R pathways including PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK and collagens were further analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) and Western blot. We observed that the mRNA expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were down-regulated in the pressure treated groups. Following pressure intervention, the trend in expression of PI3K/AKT decreased, whereas that of MEK/ERK expression increased, when quantified by q-PCR. Moreover, the level of PI3K protein expression decreased significantly after pressure treatment for one month but there was no significant difference in AKT protein expression. Interestingly, the trend in MEK/ERK protein expression was opposite to that indicated by q-PCR analysis. Furthermore, collagen I and III mRNA clearly declined after one month pressure treatment. Taken together, these results indicated that pressure intervention alleviated scar formation may via inhibiting the IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling pathway and collagen expression in the Bama minipig model.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2018.09.002DOI Listing
March 2019

RNA-seq-based analysis of the hypertrophic scarring with and without pressure therapy in a Bama minipig model.

Sci Rep 2018 08 7;8(1):11831. Epub 2018 Aug 7.

Institute of Applied Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, 030024, China.

Pressure therapy has been proved to be an effective treatment for hypertrophic scars in a clinical setting. However, evidence-based data are controversial and the precise mechanism of action of this technique remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms of pressure therapy for hypertrophic scars. We established a Bama minipig (Sus scrofa) model of hypertrophic scarring in which the scars were treated with pressure to explore the mechanism of action of the treatment. There were 568 differentially expressed genes (289 upregulated, 279 downregulated) after pressure therapy at 90 days post-injury, whereas only 365 genes were differentially expressed (250 upregulated, 115 downregulated) at 120 days post-injury. These genes were associated with metabolic pathways, ECM-receptor interaction, the PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling pathways, focal adhesion and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. In addition, the qRT-PCR results indicated that the trend of gene expression following pressure therapy was mostly consistent across the two methods. In conclusion, our systematic analysis of the transcriptome has provided a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in pressure therapy and offers an important basis for further studies of the complex signaling pathways regulated by the treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-29840-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6081447PMC
August 2018
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