Publications by authors named "Badr Sokrat"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The RanBP2/RanGAP1-SUMO complex gates β-arrestin2 nuclear entry to regulate the Mdm2-p53 signaling axis.

Oncogene 2021 Mar 1;40(12):2243-2257. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Inserm, U1016, Institut Cochin, Paris, France.

Mdm2 antagonizes the tumor suppressor p53. Targeting the Mdm2-p53 interaction represents an attractive approach for the treatment of cancers with functional p53. Investigating mechanisms underlying Mdm2-p53 regulation is therefore important. The scaffold protein β-arrestin2 (β-arr2) regulates tumor suppressor p53 by counteracting Mdm2. β-arr2 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling displaces Mdm2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm resulting in enhanced p53 signaling. β-arr2 is constitutively exported from the nucleus, via a nuclear export signal, but mechanisms regulating its nuclear entry are not completely elucidated. β-arr2 can be SUMOylated, but no information is available on how SUMO may regulate β-arr2 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. While we found β-arr2 SUMOylation to be dispensable for nuclear import, we identified a non-covalent interaction between SUMO and β-arr2, via a SUMO interaction motif (SIM), that is required for β-arr2 cytonuclear trafficking. This SIM promotes association of β-arr2 with the multimolecular RanBP2/RanGAP1-SUMO nucleocytoplasmic transport hub that resides on the cytoplasmic filaments of the nuclear pore complex. Depletion of RanBP2/RanGAP1-SUMO levels result in defective β-arr2 nuclear entry. Mutation of the SIM inhibits β-arr2 nuclear import, its ability to delocalize Mdm2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and enhanced p53 signaling in lung and breast tumor cell lines. Thus, a β-arr2 SIM nuclear entry checkpoint, coupled with active β-arr2 nuclear export, regulates its cytonuclear trafficking function to control the Mdm2-p53 signaling axis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41388-021-01704-wDOI Listing
March 2021

Genetically encoded intrabody sensors report the interaction and trafficking of β-arrestin 1 upon activation of G-protein-coupled receptors.

J Biol Chem 2020 07 21;295(30):10153-10167. Epub 2020 May 21.

Department of Biological Sciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India

Agonist stimulation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) typically leads to phosphorylation of GPCRs and binding to multifunctional proteins called β-arrestins (βarrs). The GPCR-βarr interaction critically contributes to GPCR desensitization, endocytosis, and downstream signaling, and GPCR-βarr complex formation can be used as a generic readout of GPCR and βarr activation. Although several methods are currently available to monitor GPCR-βarr interactions, additional sensors to visualize them may expand the toolbox and complement existing methods. We have previously described antibody fragments (FABs) that recognize activated βarr1 upon its interaction with the vasopressin V2 receptor C-terminal phosphopeptide (V2Rpp). Here, we demonstrate that these FABs efficiently report the formation of a GPCR-βarr1 complex for a broad set of chimeric GPCRs harboring the V2R C terminus. We adapted these FABs to an intrabody format by converting them to single-chain variable fragments and used them to monitor the localization and trafficking of βarr1 in live cells. We observed that upon agonist simulation of cells expressing chimeric GPCRs, these intrabodies first translocate to the cell surface, followed by trafficking into intracellular vesicles. The translocation pattern of intrabodies mirrored that of βarr1, and the intrabodies co-localized with βarr1 at the cell surface and in intracellular vesicles. Interestingly, we discovered that intrabody sensors can also report βarr1 recruitment and trafficking for several unmodified GPCRs. Our characterization of intrabody sensors for βarr1 recruitment and trafficking expands currently available approaches to visualize GPCR-βarr1 binding, which may help decipher additional aspects of GPCR signaling and regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.RA120.013470DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7383381PMC
July 2020