Publications by authors named "Bader Aldeen Alhafez"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella infection in a patient with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and gastrostomy tube: a case report.

J Med Case Rep 2021 Aug 5;15(1):389. Epub 2021 Aug 5.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hospital Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, M112 Starling Loving Hall, 320 West 10th Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA.

Background: Infections with nontyphoidal Salmonella most commonly cause a self-limited gastroenteritis in humans and are the leading source of foodborne illness. In the USA, the incidence of culture-confirmed invasive Salmonella is extremely rare. Here, we present a unique case of enteric nontyphoidal Salmonella enteritidis infection that progressed to an invasive bacteremia in a patient with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and gastrostomy feeding tube.

Case Presentation: A 58-year-old Caucasian woman with a past medical history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with revision and recent gastrostomy feeding tube insertion was admitted with fever and diarrhea. During her inpatient stay, two sets of blood cultures grew Salmonella enteritidis and she was promptly treated with intravenous antibiotics. Her hospital course was also complicated by acute kidney injury. The patient recovered after treatment with a third-generation cephalosporin and supportive treatment.

Conclusion: We present an unusual case of nontyphoidal Salmonella enteritidis bacteremia complicated by acute kidney injury in a middle-aged woman with a previous history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and gastrostomy feeding tube insertion. Further investigation is needed to identify whether gastric surgeries or procedures are independent risk factors for invasive nontyphoidal salmonellosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13256-021-03003-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8340372PMC
August 2021

Interactions of hypertension, obesity, left ventricular hypertrophy, and heart failure.

Curr Opin Cardiol 2021 07;36(4):453-460

John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinic Foundation.

Purpose Of Review: Hypertension (HTN) and obesity are major risk factors for cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, leading to left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and heart failure (HF). In this review, we discuss the complex mechanisms and effects of HTN and obesity, and their treatments in LVH, ventricular function, and HF.

Recent Findings: Obesity and HTN impact the heart through overlapping neurohormonal pathways. However, the relationship between obesity and cardiomyopathy is more complex, and additional metabolic and hemodynamic pathways seem to contribute to cardiac dysfunction in these patients. Weight loss and blood pressure (BP) control help to prevent and reverse at least some of the damage caused by obesity and HTN even beyond what would be expected from solely the hemodynamic changes.

Summary: Obesity and HTN cause maladaptive changes in the heart that can lead to LVH and HF. Weight loss and BP control help to, at least partially, reverse some of these changes and improve clinical outcomes in patients with HF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HCO.0000000000000868DOI Listing
July 2021

Bariatric Surgery in Patients with Obesity and Ventricular Assist Devices Considered for Heart Transplantation: Systematic Review and Individual Participant Data Meta-analysis.

J Card Fail 2021 03 25;27(3):338-348. Epub 2020 Dec 25.

John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, Louisiana; The University of Queensland Ochsner Clinical School, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Background: Class II obesity (body mass index BMI ≥35 kg/m) is a contraindication to heart transplantation (HT). Although few single-center studies (case reports/series and small cohorts) have reported promising outcomes of bariatric surgery (BS) in patients with obesity and ventricular assist devices, low sample sizes have made their analysis and interpretation challenging.

Methods And Results: We conducted a systematic search in ClinicalTrials.gov, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed, Google Scholar, and most relevant bariatric and heart failure journals. We extracted baseline and outcome individual participant data for every ventricular assist device patient undergoing BS with reported postoperative BMI and their respective timepoints when BMI data were measured. Fourteen references with 29 patients were included. The mean age was 41.9 ± 12.2 years, 82.8% underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, and 39.3% had reported perioperative adverse events. The mean pre-BS BMI was 45.5 ± 6.6 kg/m and decreased significantly during follow-up (rho -0.671; P< .00001). Among 23 patients with documented listing status, 78.3% were listed for HT. Thirteen of 28 patients (46.4%) underwent HT at 14.4 ± 7.0 months. There were no reported deaths for the HT-free 1-year period. Median follow-up was 24 months (interquartile range, 12-30 months). Twenty-two of 28 patients (78.6%) achieved the composite outcome (BMI of<35 kg/m/HT/listing for HT/myocardial recovery) at 11 months (interquartile range, 3-17 months). Patients with a BMI<45 kg/m had a higher chance of achieving the composite outcome (P< .003).

Conclusions: BS may help patients with obesity and ventricular assist devices to lose a significant amount of weight and improve their candidacy for HT or even achieve myocardial recovery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cardfail.2020.12.011DOI Listing
March 2021

Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy in obese patients with ventricular assist devices: a data note.

BMC Res Notes 2020 Sep 17;13(1):439. Epub 2020 Sep 17.

The John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA, USA.

Objectives: Patients with end-stage heart failure (ESHF) treated with ventricular assist devices (VADs) tend to gain weight after implantation, which is associated with higher complication rates and is a contraindication for heart transplantation (HT). The objective was to analyze the outcomes of obese patients with ESHF and VADs who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) at Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans, which is the only program performing VADs and HT in the State of Louisiana, and also one of the largest VAD centers in the USA.

Data Description: This dataset contains detailed baseline, perioperative, and long-term data of patients with VADs undergoing LSG. These variables were collected retrospectively from electronic medical records. Patients who achieved ≥ 50% excess BMI loss, BMI ≤ 35 kg/m, listing for HT, HT, or myocardial recovery were identified and the timing to each of these milestones was documented. These data can be used alone or in combination with other datasets to achieve a larger sample size with more power for further analysis of these variables, which include the most important, standard, and objective bariatric and ESHF outcomes of patients with VADs undergoing LSG. Elaboration of composite outcomes is feasible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-020-05272-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7496210PMC
September 2020

Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy in Patients with Ventricular Assist Devices, Beyond Just Bridging to Heart Transplantation.

Obes Surg 2020 12 8;30(12):5123-5124. Epub 2020 Sep 8.

John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-020-04966-7DOI Listing
December 2020

Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy in Patients with Obesity and Ventricular Assist Devices: a Comprehensive Outcome Analysis.

Obes Surg 2021 02 25;31(2):884-890. Epub 2020 Aug 25.

John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA, USA.

We analyzed in detail the outcomes of eight patients with ventricular assist devices (VADs) and obesity who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) at a single heart transplant (HT) center. This comprehensive analysis included body mass index (BMI) trends from VAD implantation to the time of LSG; BMI and percentage of excess BMI lost during follow-up; adverse outcomes; and changes in echocardiographic parameters, fasting lipids, unplanned hospitalizations, and functional status. We also identified the patients who achieved the following outcomes: listing for HT, HT, 50% excess BMI loss, and BMI < 35 kg/m. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy seems to be a reasonable and effective intervention to help patients with VADs and obesity to decrease excess BMI and become candidates for HT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-020-04948-9DOI Listing
February 2021

Bariatric surgery in obese patients with ventricular assist devices.

BMC Res Notes 2020 Aug 14;13(1):382. Epub 2020 Aug 14.

John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA, USA.

Objectives: Patients with end-stage heart failure (ESHF) treated with ventricular assist devices (VADs) tend to gain weight, which may prevent them from receiving heart transplantation (HT) if their body mass index (BMI) reaches ≥ 35 kg/m. The objective was to synthesize all cases available in the literature and describe the most important outcomes of bariatric surgery (BS) in VAD patients, including BMI trends, reaching a BMI < 35 kg/m, listing for HT, achieving HT, myocardial recovery, and mortality. These data were obtained for an individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis and include available IPD for every case in the scientific literature describing VAD patients undergoing BS during VAD support with documented postoperative BMI (and time of measurement) during follow-up.

Data Description: These data include baseline, periprocedural, and long-term outcomes for the 29 patients meeting selection criteria. The composite outcome includes reaching a BMI < 35 kg/m, listing for HT, receiving HT, and myocardial recovery, indicating significant BMI loss associated with major ESHF outcomes. As multiple centers are becoming more experienced in this field, the present data can be merged with their databases to form larger samples that will allow to perform further statistical analysis to identify outcome predictors and improve clinical protocols and outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-020-05221-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7427728PMC
August 2020

Aortic arch tortuosity, a novel biomarker for thoracic aortic disease, is increased in adults with bicuspid aortic valve.

Int J Cardiol 2019 06 17;284:84-89. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Department of Internal Medicine, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 6431 Fannin Street, MSB 1.150, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

Introduction: Arterial tortuosity has emerged as a predictor of adverse outcomes in congenital aortopathies using 3D reconstructed images. We validated a new method to estimate aortic arch tortuosity on 2D CT. We hypothesize that arch tortuosity may identify bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) patients at high risk to develop thoracic aortic aneurysms or aortic dissections (TAD).

Methods: BAV subjects with chest CT scans were retrospectively identified in our clinical records and matched to tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) controls by age, gender, and presentation with TAD. Subjects with prior ascending aortic intervention were excluded. Measurements included aortic arch tortuosity, length, angle, width and height. Total aortic tortuosity was estimated in subjects with available abdominal images.

Results: 120 BAV and 234 TAV subjects were included. Our 2D measurements were highly correlated with 3D midline arch measurements and had high inter- and intra-observer reliability. Compared to TAV, BAV subjects had increased arch tortuosity (median 1.76 [Q1-Q3: 1.62-1.95] vs. 1.63 [1.53-1.78], P < 0.01), length (149 [136-160] vs. 135 [122-152] mm, P < 0.01), height (46 [41-53] vs. 39 [34-47] mm, P < 0.01), and vertex acuity (70 [61-77] vs. 75 [68-81] degree, P < 0.01). In a multivariable analysis, arch tortuosity remained independently associated with BAV after adjusting for aortic diameter and other clinical characteristics.

Conclusions: We found that aortic arch tortuosity is significantly increased in BAV and may identify BAV patients who are at increased risk for TAD. Further studies to evaluate the association between tortuosity and clinical outcomes are in progress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.10.052DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6436988PMC
June 2019
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