Publications by authors named "Babatunde A Akodu"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Perspectives on the current state of Nigeria's emergency care system among participants of an emergency medicine symposium: a qualitative appraisal.

BMJ Open 2021 08 18;11(8):e043869. Epub 2021 Aug 18.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Introduction: Emergency care systems provide timely and relevant care to the acutely ill and injured. Published commentaries have characterised deficiencies in the Nigerian emergency care system and offered potential solutions but have not included the perspectives of the Nigerian public. A more inclusive approach that includes feedback from the public may help improve the Nigerian emergency care system through better understanding of the needs, values and expectations of the community.

Methods: Participants of an emergency medicine symposium participated in focus group discussions that were randomly divided into small groups led by two trained facilitators. These facilitators asked open-ended, semistructured questions to lead discussions in the English language. Participant responses were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim into transcripts. Two independent investigators employed conventional content analysis to code the transcripts until thematic saturation was achieved.

Results: Three descriptive themes emerged characterising the current state of Nigeria's emergency care system as it relates to prehospital care delivery, hospital care delivery and health system governance: rudimentary, vulnerable and disconnected. At the prehospital level, concepts revolved around emergency recognition and response, ambulance and frontline providers, and cultural norms. At the hospital level, concepts centred around the health workforce, clinical competency, hospital capacity and the burden of financial hardship. At the health system level, concepts concentrated on healthcare access and healthcare financing. Opportunities for emergency care system improvement at each component level were identified and explored.

Conclusions: The participants in this study identified shortcomings and opportunities to improve prehospital care, hospital care and health system governance. The results of this study may help healthcare professionals, policy makers and community leaders identify gaps in the emergency care system and offer solutions in harmony with the needs, values and expectations of the community. If successful, these community-informed interventions may serve as a model to improve emergency care systems throughout Africa.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-043869DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8375725PMC
August 2021

Comparison of respiratory and skin disorders between residents living close to and far from Solous landfill site in Lagos State, Nigeria.

Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med 2021 Apr 30;13(1):e1-e7. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Department of Community Health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos.

Background: Solid waste dump sites have proven to have potentially high risk to human health as it serves as a source of air, soil and underground water pollution.

Aim: This study aimed to assess and compare the knowledge, respiratory disorders and skin disorders between residents living close to and far from landfill sites in Lagos State, Nigeria.

Setting: Igando (a community within 5 km close to) and Badagry (a community beyond 5 km from) Solous Landfill sites in Lagos state, Nigeria.

Methods: A comparative cross-sectional study amongst 103 respondents recruited from each of the two study sites by multistage sampling method was carried out. Data were collected using pretested, structured, interviewer-administered questionnaire, and analysed using Microsoft Excel 2007, EPI Info 7 and WinPepi statistical software packages. Student t-test, Fisher's exact and Chi-square tests were carried out. The p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: The mean age of Igando and Badagry respondents was 34.18 ± 10.21 years and 32.62 ± 9.84 years, respectively. The two communities differed significantly (p 0.0001) with respect to distance of workplace from landfill site and duration of stay in the residential location. The mean knowledge score of respondents on respiratory and skin disorders associated with solid waste dump site close to landfill sites (82.53 ± 20.60) was statistically significantly higher than those of respondents far from landfill sites (71.84 ± 20.57) (p = 0.0003). Respiratory and skin disorders experiences of respondents close to landfill sites were statistically significantly (p 0.0001) higher than those of residents far from landfill sites with respect to wheezing, frequent sneezing, unpleasant odour, fever and skin rashes.

Conclusion: Respiratory and skin disorders experienced by respondents close to landfill sites are higher than those of residents far from landfill sites. Landfill sites should not be located close to human settlements.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v13i1.2677DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8111640PMC
April 2021

Knowledge, attitude and compliance towards travel vaccines among Nigerian travellers at an international airport.

Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med 2019 Nov 11;11(1):e1-e9. Epub 2019 Nov 11.

Department of Community Health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos.

Background: The risk of contracting a travel-related disease does not only depend on the destination of travel and length of the trip, but also on the traveller's own health status. Travel vaccines avert the increase of communicable disease. Awareness of traveller's behaviours and their attitudes concerning infectious diseases can inform policy aimed at protecting the individual travellers, their contacts and the communities into which they travel.

Aim: This study on travel vaccine was aimed to determine the level of knowledge, attitude and compliance to travel vaccines.

Setting: This study was conducted among Nigerian travellers at Murtala Mohammed International Airport, Ikeja, Nigeria.

Methods: It was a cross-sectional descriptive study using systematic sampling technique, with the aid of interviewer-administered questionnaire to select 198 respondents for the study. The statistical software EPI-Info 7 was used for data analysis.

Results: The mean age of respondents was 35.34 + 9.91 years and majority (58.1%) of the respondents were men. Majority (54.0%) were married and (43.4%) had tertiary education. About 35.9% were travelling to other African countries, 9.6% to Middle Eastern countries, 16.2% to Europe, 13.6% to North America and 7.6% to Australia. Their main purpose of travel was for employment or working (22.2%), business activities (20.7%), touring (16.2%) and visiting families and relatives (15.7%). About a half (41.4%) had good knowledge of travel vaccines, majority (83.8%) had positive attitude and majority (66.2%) had been vaccinated for yellow fever before travel.

Conclusion: Significant associations exist between tribe, religion, education and knowledge of travel vaccines.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v11i1.2063DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7081832PMC
November 2019
-->