Publications by authors named "Babak Daneshfard"

34 Publications

: A Safe Remedy for Functional Dyspepsia in Persian Medicine.

Adv Pharm Bull 2021 Jan 7;11(1):8-9. Epub 2020 Nov 7.

Health Policy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.34172/apb.2021.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7961218PMC
January 2021

Transformation of Medical Education at the Era of COVID-19 Pandemic: Shiraz Experience.

Oman Med J 2021 Jan 31;36(1):e233. Epub 2021 Jan 31.

Traditional Medicine Clinical Trial Research Center, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5001/omj.2021.82DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7931176PMC
January 2021

Obesity and Infertility: Persian Medicine Perspective.

J Reprod Infertil 2021 Jan-Mar;22(1):73-74

Traditional Medicine Clinical Trial Research Center, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18502/jri.v22i1.4999DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7903667PMC
March 2021

Early description of amniotomy in medieval Persia.

J Obstet Gynaecol Res 2021 Mar 5;47(3):1064-1067. Epub 2021 Jan 5.

Traditional Medicine Clinical Trial Research Center, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.

Aim: Artificial rupture of the amniotic membranes during the labor, which is called amniotomy, is a common procedure in modern obstetric and midwifery protocols. There is no definite agreement regarding the timing of amniotomy in a delayed labor. In this study, we have discussed the history of amniotomy in medieval Persia mentioning the Persian medicine recommendations in this regard.

Methods: We studied main Persian medicine textbooks such as Canon of Medicine by Avicenna to investigate the history of labor management and amniotomy indications. In addition, amniotomy in current literature was studied using PubMed and Google Scholar databases.

Results: Persian medicine has recommended artificial rupture of membranes for labor augmentation based on its own theories. Methods for facilitation of the labor have been divided into two groups: one group before and the other during the labor. Avicenna has carefully explained the indication of amniotomy. He has recommended artificial rupture of membranes in cases of intact membranes with cervical dilatation and fetal descent. A needle or a kind of surgical knife called Mabzaa had been introduced for this procedure.

Conclusions: It seems that Iranian physicians are the first scholars who have introduced the amniotomy for labor management in the 11th century. Persian medicine recommendations for labor facilitation should be considered in future studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jog.14638DOI Listing
March 2021

Effect of topical marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) on atopic dermatitis in children: A pilot double-blind active-controlled clinical trial of an in-silico-analyzed phytomedicine.

Phytother Res 2021 Mar 9;35(3):1389-1398. Epub 2020 Oct 9.

Traditional Medicine Clinical Trial Research Center, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing eczematous skin disease, which primarily affects infants and young children. Due to the side effects of commonly used drugs for its treatment, the development of safer therapeutic strategies is needed. There are many reports on the topical use of marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) for a range of skin diseases in Persian medicine. The main aim of the present investigation was evaluating the efficacy of marshmallow in children with mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis. Another aim of the study was screening the anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory potential of phytocomponents against target proteins, including TNF-alpha, IL6, and PDEs A, B, and D enzymes with PDB IDs: 2AZ5, 1P9M, 3I8V, 4KP6, and 1Y2K, respectively, along with their respective standard ligands using computational docking analysis. A pilot clinical trial was designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of Althaea officinalis in children with AD. The diagnosis of AD was made according to the criteria of Hanifin and Rajka. Children between 3 months and 12 years old were participated in this trial and randomly allocated into two parallel intervention and control groups. The intervention group used Althaea officinalis 1% ointment while the positive control group used Hydrocortisone 1% ointment twice a day for a week and after that, three times per week for a period of 3 weeks. The severity of AD was measured using the SCORAD score at the end of each assessment visits. A total number of 22 patients completed the study. A significant decrease of the SCORAD score was observed in both groups. At the end of the study, this score change, which indicates the improvement of the patients was significantly higher in the intervention group in comparison to the baseline (p-value = .015) and week 1 (p-value = .018). In the docking analysis of the study, 33 phytochemical compounds were identified, which were docked into the active site of IL6, TNF-alpha, and human PDE4 isoenzymes. Affinity toward the selected enzymes was significantly higher in glycosylated compounds. The results of this pilot study showed that the efficacy of Althaea officinalis 1% ointment in a decrease of disease severity is more than Hydrocortisone 1% in children with AD. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding. Moreover, the docking analysis revealed that the inhibitory activity of compounds with free hydroxyl groups such as glycosylated compounds was better than others, probably due to the hydrogen bond interaction of hydroxyl groups of the ligands with the enzymes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6899DOI Listing
March 2021

Complementary and Alternative Medicine-related Drug-induced Liver Injury in Iran.

J Clin Transl Hepatol 2020 Mar 30;8(1):106-107. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Health Policy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14218/JCTH.2020.00008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7132019PMC
March 2020

Effect of chamomile on chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in pediatric leukemia patients: A randomized triple-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Avicenna J Phytomed 2020 Jan-Feb;10(1):58-69

Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objective: Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is one of the main side effects of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment. In this trial, we evaluated the efficacy of chamomile in management of neutropenia.

Materials And Methods: This randomized triple-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in 2-18-year-old children with ALL. Participants in each group daily received 2.5 ml of either chamomile syrup or placebo syrup for a period of 30 days. Participants' white blood cell (WBC), and absolute neutrophil count (ANC), as well as their quality of life were evaluated.

Results: The study was completed with a total of 40 patients. An increasing trend of ANC was observed in the treatment group despite the decreasing trend in placebo group, which was statistically significant between the two groups (P Interaction=0.019, 95% confidence intervals=15.076-171.324). No serious side effects were reported.

Conclusion: Using chamomile syrup as a complementary therapy in children with leukemia could improve their immunity (as it increased WBC) by minimizing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6941685PMC
January 2020

The effect of Delphinium denudatum (Jadwar) on fatigue: A randomized double blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Complement Ther Med 2019 Oct 30;46:29-35. Epub 2019 May 30.

Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objectives: Fatigue is a common problem in modern-day life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Delphinium denudatum (Jadwar) on fatigue.

Methods: This study was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial between healthy normal university students. In each group, participants were given one capsule of either WEACURE® (containing 500 mg of Jadwar root powder) or placebo for 15 consecutive days. Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) questionnaire was used before and after the intervention to evaluate different aspects of fatigue.

Results: A total number of 64 participants completed the study. Data analysis showed decrease in the scores of all five domains of fatigue in Jadwar group (13.31 ± 3.05-7.75 ± 2.66, 12.31 ± 3.55-7.63 ± 2.62, 12.22 ± 4.26-6.97 ± 2.06, 11.56 ± 4.21 to 7.28 ± 2.37, 12.91 ± 3.09-7.34 ± 2.13 in general fatigue, physical fatigue, reduced activity, reduced motivation, and mental fatigue domains, respectively) which was statistically significant (P value<0.0001). This situation was significantly superior to the placebo group. Prescribed dosage of WEACURE® capsule was well tolerated.

Conclusion: As a complementary tonic agent, Jadwar have a potential to reduce fatigue in normal population. However, objective evaluation of its anti-fatigue effect should be further evaluated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2019.05.027DOI Listing
October 2019

Insomnia in Traditional Persian Medicine.

Acta Med Hist Adriat 2019 06;17(1):45-54

Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Zand street, 7134845794, Shiraz, Iran.

Insomnia is a common complaint in outpatient clinics. It usually affects quality of life neg-atively, especially in severe cases. Nowadays, routine medical interventions comprise pharmacological approaches and cognitive behavioral therapy. Common medications used by af-flicted patients are not competent enough in addition to their annoying side effects. It would naturally denote the need for considering novel strategies for treating insomniac patients. Approach to insomnia in traditional Persian medicine (TPM) has been cited in a scrutinized manner focusing on its main causes. Accordingly, its treatment is tailored based on the constitution of the patient, intensity of the disease, and type of the cause. In this paper we have discussed the causes of insomnia, diagnostic approach, and various medical interventions proposed in valid sources of TPM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.31952/amha.17.1.2DOI Listing
June 2019

"Eye of the Tiger" in a Non-Responsive Neuropsychiatric Patient: A Case Report.

Acta Med Iran 2018 Jan;56(1):71-73

Student's Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with hereditary properties. It usually occurs in young adolescents with extrapyramidal symptoms besides disturbed mental function. In this study, we present a 23-year-old neuropsychiatric patient who primarily misdiagnosed to have conversion disorder. She had 5-year history of progressive dysarthria and generalized abnormal movements. After detecting the pathognomonic sign of "eye of the tiger" diagnosis was confirmed. The patient was discharged. She had satisfactory condition in her follow-up. Such a rare syndrome should be considered in patients with similar presentation, and upon the diagnosis, PKAN2 gene study should be done to detect possible new mutations.
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January 2018

Prolegomena to a True Integrative Medical Paradigm.

Altern Ther Health Med 2019 Mar;25(2)

When a paradigm starts to show signs of failure to cope with significant questions in any basic/applied branch of human knowledge, there come on the scene those who have perused the related literature enough to either answer those major questions according to the established paradigm or proffer a (wholly) new way of looking at things. In the latter case, the history of science tells us, a paradigm shift takes place. Modern medicine cannot be proven to be totally disconnected from its traditional roots. Where traditional medicine came to give its place to present-day conventional medicine, a number of humanistic aspects of healing, in addition to some axioms of old wisdom, were actually lost. Employing a personalized strategy by considering the patient's specific conditions, integrative medicine endeavors to apply all appropriate interventions from a whole set of science branches to bring back health. However, this does not remain fully without its own challenges from almost all sides. Complementary and alternative medicine, on the one hand, and evidence-based medicine, on the other, have their own rightful say in the affair. Delving deep into the details of medical history's ups and downs, and examining-from the philosophy of medicine's and philosophy of science's standpoints-the pros and cons of integrative medicine, this present treatise makes a systemic, interdisciplinary effort to put forward the best possible paradigmatology in a methodical way as far as the demands of society are concerned.
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March 2019

A review on botanicals with wound healing activity for pemphigus vulgaris perspective of traditional Persian medicine and conventional medicine.

Avicenna J Phytomed 2017 Nov-Dec;7(6):486-494

Department of Traditional Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Objective: As a rare autoimmune disease, pemphigus vulgaris has a poor prognosis especially in lack of proper medical support. This blistering disease involves both the skin and mucus membranes. The challenge is improving the healing process of skin lesions of which, superimposed infections are among the main causes of the disease mortality. Accordingly, we aimed to assess the treatment options suggested by traditional Persian medicine (TPM) and compare them with current findings.

Materials And Methods: We studied the main clinical and pharmaceutical textbooks of TPM (Kitāb al-hāwīfī al-tibb, the Canon of Medicine, Eksir-e-Aazam, Tuhfat al-mu'minīn, Makhzan al-adviyah (focusing on the skin chapter and respective herbal remedies for the inflamed skin and ulcers. Additionally, scientific databases such as PubMed, Science direct, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched for the current pharmacological evidence. In the studied books, the term "hot ulcers" was found close to what is known as "Pemphigus vulgaris".

Results: Reported medicinal herbs possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, wound healing, and antibacterial activities reported by recent studies. Therefore, they could be introduced as novel natural remedies for pemphigoid wounds.

Conclusion: Taken as a whole, the review of traditional remedies for hot ulcers in Persian medical and pharmaceutical literature may open a new window toward developing new topical treatments for this disease.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5745532PMC
January 2018

Ibn Mandevaih Isfahani (949-983(?) AD), a physician from Isfahan's medical school.

J Med Biogr 2020 Aug 26;28(3):126-131. Epub 2017 Oct 26.

Student Research Committee, 48435Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Essence of Parsiyan Wisdom Institute, Phytopharmaceutical Technology and Traditional Medicine Incubator, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

There have arisen a number of prominent Iranian-Islamic physicians throughout the history of the fertile medicine landscape of Iran, some of whom are not very well known. Abu Ali Ahmad ibn Abd al-Rahman Mandevaih Isfahani (949-983(?) AD) was a great medical figure with scientific activities in the Hospital of Isfahan and al-Adudi Hospital of Baghdad in the golden age of Iranian-Islamic history, culture, and civilization during the reign of the Buyid dynasty and Abbasid Caliphate. He was also a prominent physician during the reign of Adud al-Dawla Deylami (949-983 AD). This present research has as its objectives the studying of the scientific life of ibn Mandevaih Isfahani and his works in this field. The works of this scientist and scholar reflect his skill and expertise in literature, philosophy, medicine, and medicine-related fields including ophthalmology and pharmacology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0967772017719144DOI Listing
August 2020

Parameters Contributing to Aging: Avicenna's Viewpoints.

Acta Med Iran 2017 07;55(7):480-481

Research Center for Traditional Medicine and History of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. AND Essence of Parsiyan Wisdom Institute, Phytopharmaceutical Technology and Traditional Medicine Incubator, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

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July 2017

DRY CUPPING IN CHILDREN WITH FUNCTIONAL CONSTIPATION: A RANDOMIZED OPEN LABEL CLINICAL TRIAL.

Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med 2016 3;13(4):22-28. Epub 2016 Jul 3.

Department of Pediatrics, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.

Background: As a common disease in pediatrics, constipation poses a high burden to the community. In this study, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of dry cupping therapy (an Eastern traditional manipulative therapy) in children with functional constipation.

Materials And Methods: One hundred and twenty children (4-18 years old) diagnosed as functional constipation according to ROME III criteria were assigned to receive a traditional dry cupping protocol on the abdominal wall for 8 minutes every other day or standard laxative therapy (Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 40% solution without electrolyte), 0.4 g/kg once daily) for 4 weeks, in an open label randomized controlled clinical trial using a parallel design with a 1:1 allocation ratio. Patients were evaluated prior to and following 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks of the intervention commencement in terms of the ROME III criteria for functional constipation.

Results: There were no significant differences between the two arms regarding demographic and clinical basic characteristics. After two weeks of the intervention, there was a significant better result in most of the items of ROME III criteria of patients in PEG group. In contrast, after four weeks of the intervention, the result was significantly better in the cupping group. There was no significant difference in the number of patients with constipation after 4 and 8 weeks of the follow-up period.

Conclusion: This study showed that dry cupping of the abdominal wall, as a traditional manipulative therapy, can be as effective as standard laxative therapy in children with functional constipation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21010/ajtcam.v13i4.4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5566148PMC
September 2017

Drinking water in traditional Persian medicine: Do's and don'ts.

Electron Physician 2017 May 25;9(5):4330-4331. Epub 2017 May 25.

MD, Ph.D. Candidate of Traditional Persian Medicine, Essence of Parsiyan Wisdom Institute, Phytopharmaceutical Technology and Traditional Medicine Incubator, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Water is the main component of our body and its balance is vital for maintaining normal physiology. Accordingly, adequate fluid intake in the daily diet is very important for a healthy life. Nevertheless, there is a controversy about what the suitable amount of water that we need to drink is. In this paper, we aimed to discuss this important issue based on the doctrine of traditional Persian medicine (TPM) and our clinical experience in a practical manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.19082/4330DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5498696PMC
May 2017

Severe Acro-osteolysis in a Case of Limited Cutaneous Scleroderma.

Iran J Public Health 2017 Jan;46(1):146-147

Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5401929PMC
January 2017

Biological Effects and Clinical Applications of Dwarf Elder ( Sambucus ebulus L): A Review.

J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med 2017 10 11;22(4):996-1001. Epub 2017 Apr 11.

5 Noncommunicable Diseases Research Center, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran.

Dwarf elder ( Sambucus ebulus L) is one of the best known medicinal herbs since ancient times. In view of its benefits as a widely applicable phytomedicine, it is still used in folk medicine of different parts of the world. In addition to its nutritional values, dwarf elder contains different phytochemicals among which flavonoids and lectins are responsible for most of its therapeutic effects. Dwarf elder has been used for different ailments including: joint pains, cold, wounds, and infections. Nevertheless, recent evidence has revealed its potentials for making attempts at treating cancer and metabolic disorders. This review aimed to provide a comprehensive description of dwarf elder regarding its traditional uses and modern findings which may contribute to the development of novel natural-based therapeutic agents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2156587217701322DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5871274PMC
October 2017

Efficacy of topical chamomile oil for mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Complement Ther Clin Pract 2017 Feb 30;26:61-67. Epub 2016 Nov 30.

Department of Traditional Pharmacy, School of Traditional Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of topical chamomile oil in patients with mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS).

Method: Eighty six patients with electrodiagnostic criteria of mild and moderate CTS were enrolled in this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial and received wrist splint plus topical chamomile oil or placebo for 4 weeks. They were evaluated at the baseline and end of the study regarding functional and symptomatic scores, dynamometry, and electrodiagnostic indexes.

Results: Dynamometry, functionality, and symptom severity scores of the patients were significantly improved in the chamomile oil group compared with the placebo group (P = 0.040, P = 0.0001, P = 0.017, respectively). Additionally, compound latency of the median nerve in the chamomile oil group significantly decreased (P = 0.035) compared to the placebo group. Other electerodiagnostic measurements did not change significantly.

Conclusion: Complementary treatment with topical chamomile oil may have some benefits for patients with mild and moderate CTS, both subjectively and objectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2016.11.010DOI Listing
February 2017

Early Description of Diet-Induced Blistering Skin Diseases in Medieval Persia: Avicenna's Point of View.

Skinmed 2016;14(5):367-370. Epub 2016 Oct 1.

Departments of Pharmacognosy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering skin disease that is strongly associated with different environmental factors. Among these, nutritional factors are considered to trigger pemphigus; however, their role may be underestimated. Investigated more recently in conventional medicine, this causative bond between dietary factors and blistering skin diseases was mentioned by Persian scholars such as Avicenna a thousand years ago. Avicenna, a well-known Persian physician and philosopher, who could be considered a pioneer in dermatology, discussed skin diseases in a chapter in . He accounted for some nutritional triggers for skin blisters (mentioned as "hot swellings"), such as onion, garlic, leek, pepper, and wine. His precise description of causative factors based on principles of traditional Persian medicine (TPM) is appreciable and might well lead us to find more efficient ways for the prevention and treatment of blistering skin diseases.
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September 2018

Porosity and Health: Perspective of Traditional Persian Medicine.

Iran J Med Sci 2016 May;41(3 Suppl):S47

Department of Traditional Persian Medicine, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: The authors of this manuscript aimed to show the importance of porosity and condensation in health according to traditional Persian medicine (TPM) with consideration of new evidence in conventional medicine.

Methods: Cardinal traditional medical and pharmacological texts were searched for the traditional terms of takhalkhol (porosity) and takassof (condensity) focused on preventive methods. The findings were classified and compared with new medical findings.

Results: According to traditional Persian medicine, porosity and condensity are the two crucial items that contribute to human health. Somatotype is a taxonomy based on embryonic development, which may be considered in parallel with porosity and condensation. However, these terms are not completely the same. There are many causes for acquired porosity comprising hot weather, too much intercourse, rage, starvation, and heavy exercises. In general, porosity increases the risk of diseases as it makes the body organs vulnerable to external hot and cold weather. On the other hand, the porose organs are more susceptible to accumulation of morbid matters because the cellular wastes cannot be evacuated in the normal way. There are some common points between traditional and conventional medicine in the context of porosity and condensity. The relation between diet and somatotype is an example.

Conclusion: Condensity and porosity are the two basic items cited in the TPM resources and contribute to health maintenance and disease prevention of body organs. Creating a balance between these two states in different body organs, strongly contributes to disease prevention, treatment and diminishing chronic diseases period. Choosing proper modality including diet, drug therapy, and manual therapy depends on the amount porosity and stiffness of the considered organ and the preferred porosity of the affected organ keeping in a normal healthy state.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5103555PMC
May 2016

Avicenna's View on Optimal Daily Water Intake.

Iran J Med Sci 2016 May;41(3 Suppl):S23

Essence of Parsiyan Wisdom Institute, Traditional Medicine and Medicinal Plant Incubator, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Department of Traditional Persian Medicine, School of Traditional Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: Fluid intake is an essential factor in having a normal homeostasis. However, proper amount of daily water intake in a healthy individual is controversial. There is a prevalent thought that we all have to drink eight glasses of water daily, however, it lacks enough supportive evidence at least for healthy individuals. Here, we try to clarify this topic from the perspective of Avicenna and traditional Persian medicine (TPM).

Methods: The most important traditional Persian medical encyclopedia, Al-Qanun fil-Tibb (Canon of Medicine), was reviewed. Furthermore, Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, IranMedex, and Science Iranian Database (SID) focusing on the keywords "traditional medicine", "water intake", "fluid'', and "complementary and alternative medicine" were reviewed to find relevant information.

Results: Avicenna believed that the demand for daily water is not the same in different individuals. The determinant variables mentioned in his book, The Canon of Medicine, comprises mizaj (temperament), health status, age, sex, season, place, habits, occupation, etc. He believed that water in extra amount quenches the hararat-e-ghariezi, which is the basal internal heat to convey normal homeostasis and metabolism in the body.

Conclusion: Several factors determine the actual need of any person to drink water. Consequently, recommending a specific amount of daily water intake for all is illogical. Moreover, important recommendations of TPM sages on an appropriate amount of water intake should be considered to prevent associated disorders.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5103529PMC
May 2016

Finger Printlessness in Scleroderma.

Iran J Public Health 2016 Jun;45(6):835-6

Research Center for Traditional Medicine and History of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Essence of Parsiyan Wisdom Institute, Phytopharmaceutical Technology and Traditional Medicine Incubator, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Dept. of Traditional Persian Medicine, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5026847PMC
June 2016

Optimal fluid intake in daily diet: Avicenna's view.

J Integr Med 2016 Jul;14(4):241-4

Essence of Parsiyan Wisdom Institute, Phytopharmaceutical Technology and Traditional Medicine Incubator, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Adequate daily water consumption is an important factor of keeping regular homeostasis. However, the best quantity of daily water consumption for a healthy individual is not virtually stated in the literature. Despite the dearth of evidence-based recommendations, it is commonly thought that ingesting eight glasses of water a day is good for a healthy person. Avicenna had a unique viewpoint. He believed that daily water intake depended on numerous elements together with age, intercourse, body temperament, season, occupation and various internal and external elements. He also cited a few essential and useful measures regarding proper water consumption, which have additionally been emphasized in Islamic hadiths.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2095-4964(16)60262-5DOI Listing
July 2016

Green Urine in Traditional Persian Medicine: Differential Diagnosis and Clinical Relevance.

J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med 2017 Apr 8;22(2):232-236. Epub 2016 Jul 8.

2 Essence of Parsiyan Wisdom Institute, Phytopharmaceutical and Traditional Medicine Incubator, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

The color of urine is an important factor in urine examination, which can help physicians differentiate various diseases. Today, it is known that certain dyes, drug intoxications, and diseases can induce green urine discoloration. In the view of traditional Persian medicine, which is based on humoral medicine, green urine discoloration is generally referred to the dominance of coldness in the body. In fact, it is considered to be a result of a special kind of humoral imbalance and fluid depletion or retention in the human body. Persian scholars believed that green urine could be an indicator of intoxication or a predictor of an imminent spasm or convulsion in pediatric patients. Further investigations could result in finding new diagnostic scales of urine color based on the teachings of traditional Persian medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2156587216641828DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5871183PMC
April 2017

Epidemiology of stroke in Shiraz, Iran.

Iran J Neurol 2015 Jul;14(3):158-63

Shiraz Neuroscience Research Center AND Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: Stroke is the main cause of physical disability and the second leading cause of death worldwide. Two-thirds of all strokes occur in the developing countries. Despite being preventable, stroke is increasingly becoming a major health issue in these countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of stroke in Shiraz, Iran, one of the main referral centers in the southwestern part of Iran.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on all stroke patients admitted to the Namazee Hospital, affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, between August 2010 and January 2011. Patients' demographic data, atherosclerosis risk factors, type of stroke, drug history, outcomes, and neurological signs were recorded. Chi-square test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, t-test, and Mann-Whitney U-test were used to analyze the data.

Results: A total of 305 patients with stroke, aged 27-97 years (mean ± SD = 68.33 ± 12.99), 269 patients (88.2%) had ischemic stroke (IS) and 36 (11.8%) had hemorrhagic stroke (HS). 133 patients (43.6%) were men and 172 (56.4%) were women. 11.4% of the patients with IS and 40.6% with HS died during hospitalization, causing 12.1% death in all stroke patients [Odds ratio (Or) = 5.34, 95% Confidence intervals (CI) = 2.35-12.11]. Hypertension, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, and recurrent stroke were the most common risk factors.

Conclusion: This study provides evidence that the epidemiology of stroke in the southwestern part of Iran may be similar to other places. However, it seems necessary and helpful to design a registration system for patients with stroke in Shiraz Namazee Hospital.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4662689PMC
July 2015

Pelvic Thrusting in a Case of Psychogenic Seizure.

Iran J Public Health 2015 Jul;44(7):1031-2

Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4645759PMC
July 2015

A pilot randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial on topical chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) oil for severe carpal tunnel syndrome.

Complement Ther Clin Pract 2015 Nov 12;21(4):223-8. Epub 2015 Aug 12.

Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center and Department of Phytopharmaceuticals (Traditional Pharmacy), School of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Research Office for the History of Persian Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of standardized topical Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) oil in patients with severe carpal tunnel syndrome, as a complementary treatment.

Method: A pilot randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted. Twenty six patients with documented severe carpal tunnel syndrome were treated in two parallel groups with a night splint plus topical chamomile oil or placebo. They were instructed to use their prescribed oil for 4 weeks, twice daily. Symptomatic and functional status of the patients and their electrodiagnostic parameters were evaluated when enrolled and after the trial period, as our outcome measures.

Results: A significant improvement of symptomatic and functional status of patients in the chamomile oil group was observed (p = 0.019 and 0.016, respectively) compared with those in the placebo group. However, electrodiagnostic parameters showed no significant changes between the two groups.

Conclusion: Chamomile oil improved symptomatic and functional status of patients with severe carpal tunnel syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2015.08.001DOI Listing
November 2015

Chorasmia Medical School from the beginning until the Mongol invasion.

J Med Ethics Hist Med 2015 14;8:11. Epub 2015 Nov 14.

MD, PhD Student in Traditional Persian Medicine, Research Center for Traditional Medicine and History of Medicine, AND Essence of Parsiyan Wisdom Institute, Traditional Medicine and Medicinal Plant Incubator, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

In research on the history of medicine, less attention is paid to the subject of historical geography. Considering the importance of this subject in the history of science, this paper discusses one of the most important science centers in the world. This outstanding medical research center was located in Gorganch city, Chorasmia area, in the Eastern part of the Islamic. Chorasmia medical school was one of the important Iranian medical schools before the Mongols' attack. Its history (305-1231 A.D.) can be divided into three eras; Ale Iraq, Ale Ma'mun, and era of the Khwarazmian dynasty. This geographical area in the Northeast of Iran has escaped the notice of researchers in recent studies. The presence of great Persian physicians and scientists throughout history in this area indicates its scientific importance. The present article focuses on Chorasmia Medical School since its establishment until the Mongols' attack.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4920981PMC
June 2016