Publications by authors named "B Tan"

3,858 Publications

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Regulatory Mechanism and Experimental Verification of Patchouli Alcohol on Gastric Cancer Cell Based on Network Pharmacology.

Front Oncol 2021 1;11:711984. Epub 2021 Sep 1.

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China.

Background: is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) that is frequently used to treat various gastrointestinal diseases. Patchouli alcohol (PA), a compound extracted from the , has been shown to have anti-tumor efficacy in human colorectal cancer. However, the mechanism of PA's anticancer effect on gastric cancer (GC) remains unknown.

Methods: We used the public database to obtain the potential targets of PA and genes related to GC. Bioinformatic analyses, such as the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), Gene Ontology (GO), and protein-protein interactions (PPI), were used for analyzing the potential signal pathways and targets. Cell experiments were also conducted to further explain the impact and molecular mechanism of PA on GC, as well as to confirm the findings of network pharmacology.

Results: Using network pharmacological analysis, 161 possible targets were identified for the treatment of GC. Network analysis and functional enrichment analysis show that PA produced a marked effect in the treatment of GC through multi-targets and multi-pathways, especially the MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal pathways. In addition, PA showed the inhibition of GC cell proliferation, migration and invasion in cell experiments. According to our findings, PA could also cause G0/G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in GC cells.

Conclusion: Using network pharmacology, we aim to uncover the possible molecular mechanism of PA on GC treatment in this research. Cell experiments were also conducted to confirm the therapeutic effect of PA on GC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2021.711984DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8440821PMC
September 2021

Fermented Cottonseed Meal as a Partial Replacement for Soybean Meal Could Improve the Growth Performance, Immunity and Antioxidant Properties, and Nutrient Digestibility by Altering the Gut Microbiota Profile of Weaned Piglets.

Front Microbiol 2021 1;12:734389. Epub 2021 Sep 1.

College of Animal Science and Technology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, China.

The study investigated the impact of fermented cottonseed meal (FCSM) on growth performance, immunity and antioxidant properties, nutrient digestibility, and gut microbiota of weaned piglets by replacing soybean meal with FCSM in the diet. The experimental piglets were fed with either the soybean meal diet (SBM group) or fermented cottonseed meal diet (FCSM group) for 14days after weaning. The digestibility of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), gross energy (GE), amino acids and nitrogen was higher in the FCSM diet than those in the SBM diet (<0.05). The piglets in the FCSM group showed greater growth performance and lower diarrhea rate than those in the SBM group (<0.05). The concentration of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and antioxidase, intestinal and hepatic antioxidase were increased and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the serum was decreased in those piglets in the FCSM group compared to those piglets in the SBM group (<0.05). The piglets in the FCSM group had a higher concentration of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in their ileum and cecum and a higher Simpson index of ileum than piglets in the SBM group (<0.05). The relative abundance of and in ileum and , , and in cecum were enhanced in piglets fed with the FCSM diet, whereas the relative abundance of and were increased in piglets fed with the SBM diet. Overall, FCSM replacing SBM improved the growth performance, immunity and antioxidant properties, and nutrient digestibility; possibly the alterant gut microbiota and its metabolism of weaned piglets. Graphical AbstractFermented cottonseed meal as a partial replacement for soybean meal could improve the growth performance, immunity and antioxidant properties, and nutrient digestibility by altering the gut microbiota profile of weaned piglets. SBM, soybean meal; FCSM, fermented cottonseed meal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2021.734389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8440953PMC
September 2021

International Changes in COVID-19 Clinical Trajectories Across 315 Hospitals and 6 Countries: a 4CE Consortium Study.

J Med Internet Res 2021 Sep 2. Epub 2021 Sep 2.

Institute for Biomedical Informatics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, US.

Background: Many countries have experienced two predominant waves of COVID-19-related hospitalizations. Comparing the clinical trajectories of patients hospitalized in separate waves of the pandemic enables further understanding of the evolving epidemiology, pathophysiology, and healthcare dynamics of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Objective: In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed electronic health record (EHR) data from patients with SARS-CoV-2 infections hospitalized in participating healthcare systems representing 315 hospitals across six countries. We compared hospitalization rates, severe COVID-19 risk, and mean laboratory values between patients hospitalized during the first and second waves of the pandemic.

Methods: Using a federated approach, each participating healthcare system extracted patient-level clinical data on their first and second wave cohorts and submitted aggregated data to the central site. Data quality control steps were performed at the central site to correct for implausible values and harmonize units. Statistical analyses were performed by computing individual healthcare system effect sizes and synthesizing these using random effects meta-analyses to account for heterogeneity. We focused the laboratory analysis on C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, fibrinogen, procalcitonin, D-dimer, and creatinine based on their reported associations with severe COVID-19.

Results: Data were available for 79,613 patients, of which 32,467 were hospitalized in the first wave and 47,146 in the second wave. The prevalence of male patients and patients aged 50-69 decreased significantly between the first and second wave. Patients hospitalized in the second wave had a 9.9% reduction in risk of severe COVID-19 compared to patients hospitalized in the first wave (95% CI: 8.5-11.3%). Demographic subgroup analyses indicated that patients aged 26-49 and 50-69; male and female patients; and Black patients had significantly lower risk for severe disease in the second wave compared to the first wave. At admission, the mean values of CRP were significantly lower in the second wave compared to the first. On the seventh hospital day, mean values of CRP, ferritin, fibrinogen, and procalcitonin were significantly lower in the second wave compared to the first. In general, countries exhibited variable changes in laboratory testing rates from the first to the second wave. At admission, there was a significantly higher testing rate for D-dimer in France, Germany, and Spain.

Conclusions: Patients hospitalized in the second wave were at significantly lower risk for severe COVID-19. This corresponded to mean laboratory values in the second wave that were more likely to be in typical physiological ranges on the seventh hospital day compared to the first wave. Our federated approach demonstrated the feasibility and power of harmonizing heterogeneous EHR data from multiple international healthcare systems to rapidly conduct large-scale studies to characterize how COVID-19 clinical trajectories evolve.

Clinicaltrial:
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/31400DOI Listing
September 2021

Neoadjuvant intraperitoneal and systemic paclitaxel combined with apatinib and S-1 chemotherapy for conversion therapy in gastric cancer patients with positive exfoliative cytology: a prospective study.

J Gastrointest Oncol 2021 Aug;12(4):1416-1427

The Third Department of Surgery, the Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China.

Background: To explore the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant intraperitoneal and systemic (NIPS) paclitaxel chemotherapy combined with apatinib and S-1 in the treatment of gastric cancer patients with positive exfoliative cytology.

Methods: Patients with gastric cancer (PCY) who were confirmed to have free cancer cells (FCCs) in the abdominal cavity after laparoscopic exploration from April 2018 to August 2019 were enrolled. All patients underwent NIPS chemotherapy using paclitaxel combined with apatinib and S-1 treatment. Laparoscopic exploration was performed after 3 cycles of conversion therapy. The primary study endpoint was the FCC negative rate, and the secondary study endpoints were overall survival time (OS), progression-free survival time (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and safety indicators.

Results: Out of 312 advanced gastric cancer patients who underwent laparoscopic exploration, 36 patients with PCY gastric cancer were identified and enrolled in this study. After 3 cycles of conversion therapy, the ORR was 80.56% and the DCR was 94.44%. All patients underwent secondary laparoscopic exploration, and the FCC conversion rate was 77.78%. All patients with negative FCC underwent R0 surgical resection, with a median follow-up time of 11.4 months. The median survival time was 15.5 months, and the 1-year OS was 80.55%. The median PFS was 14.4 months, and the 1-year PFS was 75.00%. Treatment-related grade 3 adverse reactions were mainly leukopenia and neutropenia. No grade 4 adverse reactions were observed. There were no reported deaths related to chemotherapy or surgery in the study cohort.

Conclusions: NIPS with paclitaxel combined with apatinib and S-1 treatment may increase the FCC negative rate of PCY gastric cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jgo-21-375DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8421905PMC
August 2021

The Role of Polyphenols in Regulation of Heat Shock Proteins and Gut Microbiota in Weaning Stress.

Oxid Med Cell Longev 2021 6;2021:6676444. Epub 2021 Sep 6.

Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha, 410125 Hunan, China.

Gut microbiota is the natural residents of the intestinal ecosystem which display multiple functions that provide beneficial effects on host physiology. Disturbances in gut microbiota in weaning stress are regulated by the immune system and oxidative stress-related protein pathways. Weaning stress also alters gut microbiota response, limits digestibility, and influences animal productive performance through the production of inflammatory molecules. Heat shock proteins are the molecular chaperones that perform array functions from physiological to pathological point of view and remodeling cellular stress response. As it is involved in the defense mechanism, polyphenols ensure cellular tolerance against enormous stimuli. Polyphenols are nature-blessed compounds that show their existence in plenty of amounts. Due to their wider availability and popularity, they can exert strong immunomodulatory, antioxidative, and anti-inflammatory activities. Their promising health-promoting effects have been demonstrated in different cellular and animal studies. Dietary interventions with polyphenols may alter the gut microbiome response and attenuate the weaning stress related to inflammation. Further, polyphenols elicit health-favored effects through ameliorating inflammatory processes to improve digestibility and thereby exert a protective effect on animal production. Here, in this article, we will expand the role of dietary polyphenol intervention strategies in weaning stress which perturbs gut microbiota function and also paid emphasis to heat shock proteins in gut health. This review article gives new direction to the feed industry to formulate diet containing polyphenols which would have a significant impact on animal health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/6676444DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8440081PMC
September 2021
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