Publications by authors named "B T P Hijmans-Kersten"

4 Publications

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The association between treatment and systemic inflammation in acromegaly.

Growth Horm IGF Res 2021 Apr-Jun;57-58:101391. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Objective: Acromegaly is characterized by an excess of growth hormone (GH) and insulin like growth-factor 1 (IGF1), and it is strongly associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Both acute and long-lasting pro-inflammatory effects have been attributed to IGF1. Previous results suggest the presence of systemic inflammation in treated patients. Here we assessed the association between treatment of acromegaly, systemic inflammation and vascular function.

Design: Ex vivo cytokine production and circulating inflammatory markers were assessed in peripheral blood from treated and untreated acromegaly patients (N = 120), and compared them with healthy controls. A more comprehensive prospective inflammatory and vascular assessment was conducted in a subgroup of six treatment-naive patients with follow-up during treatment.

Results: Circulating concentrations of VCAM1, E-selectin and MMP2 were higher in patients with uncontrolled disease, whereas the concentrations of IL18 were lower. In stimulated whole blood, cytokine production was skewed towards a more pro-inflammatory profile in patients, especially those with untreated disease. Prospective vascular measurements in untreated patients showed improvement of endothelial function during treatment.

Conclusions: Acromegaly patients are characterized by a pro-inflammatory phenotype, most pronounced in those with uncontrolled disease. Treatment only partially reverses this pro-inflammatory bias. These findings suggest that systemic inflammation could contribute to the increased risk of CVD in acromegaly patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ghir.2021.101391DOI Listing
April 2021

Persistent inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with treated acromegaly.

Endocr Connect 2019 Dec;8(12):1553-1567

R Netea-Maier, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Radboudumc, Nijmegen, Netherlands.

Objective: Acromegaly is characterized by an excess of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors are common in acromegaly and often persist after treatment. Both acute and long-lasting pro-inflammatory effects have been attributed to IGF1. Therefore, we hypothesized that inflammation persists in treated acromegaly and may contribute to CVD risk.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we assessed cardiovascular structure and function, and inflammatory parameters in treated acromegaly patients. Immune cell populations and inflammatory markers were assessed in peripheral blood from 71 treated acromegaly patients (with controlled or uncontrolled disease) and 41 matched controls. Whole blood (WB) was stimulated with Toll-like receptor ligands. In a subgroup of 21 controls and 33 patients with controlled disease, vascular ultrasound measurements were performed.

Results: Leukocyte counts were lower in patients with controlled acromegaly compared to patients with uncontrolled acromegaly and controls. Circulating IL18 concentrations were lower in patients; concentrations of other inflammatory mediators were comparable with controls. In stimulated WB, cytokine production was skewed toward inflammation in patients, most pronounced in those with uncontrolled disease. Vascular measurements in controlled patients showed endothelial dysfunction as indicated by a lower flow-mediated dilatation/nitroglycerine-mediated dilatation ratio. Surprisingly, pulse wave analysis and pulse wave velocity, both markers of endothelial dysfunction, were lower in patients, whereas intima-media thickness did not differ.

Conclusions: Despite treatment, acromegaly patients display persistent inflammatory changes and endothelial dysfunction, which may contribute to CVD risk and development of CVD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/EC-19-0430DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6933829PMC
December 2019

Vascular Function and Structure in Veteran Athletes after Myocardial Infarction.

Med Sci Sports Exerc 2017 01;49(1):21-28

1Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Physiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS; 2Research Institute for Sports and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UNITED KINGDOM; and 3Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Neurology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS.

Purpose: Although athletes demonstrate lower cardiovascular risk and superior vascular function compared with sedentary peers, they are not exempted from cardiac events (i.e., myocardial infarction [MI]). The presence of an MI is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and impaired vascular function. We tested the hypothesis that lifelong exercise training in post-MI athletes, similar as in healthy controls, is associated with a superior peripheral vascular function and structure compared with a sedentary lifestyle in post-MI individuals.

Methods: We included 18 veteran athletes (ATH) (>20 yr) and 18 sedentary controls (SED). To understand the effect of lifelong exercise training after MI, we included 20 veteran post-MI athletes (ATH + MI) and 19 sedentary post-MI controls (SED + MI). Participants underwent comprehensive assessment using vascular ultrasound (vascular stiffness, intima-media thickness, and endothelium (in)dependent mediated dilatation). Lifetime risk score was calculated for a 30-yr risk prediction of cardiovascular disease mortality of the participants.

Results: ATH demonstrated a lower vascular stiffness and smaller femoral intima-media thickness compared with SED. Vascular function and structure did not differ between ATH + MI and SED + MI. ATH (4.0% ± 5.1%) and ATH + MI (6.1% ± 3.7%) had a significantly better lifetime risk score compared with their sedentary peers (SED: 6.9% ± 3.7% and SED + MI: 9.3% ± 4.8%). ATH + MI had no secondary events versus two recurrent MI and six elective percutaneous coronary interventions within SED + MI (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Although veteran post-MI athletes did not have a superior peripheral vascular function and structure compared with their sedentary post-MI peers, benefits of lifelong exercise training in veteran post-MI athletes relate to a better cardiovascular risk profile and lower occurrence of secondary events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000001075DOI Listing
January 2017

Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training versus Continuous Training on Physical Fitness, Cardiovascular Function and Quality of Life in Heart Failure Patients.

PLoS One 2015 30;10(10):e0141256. Epub 2015 Oct 30.

Radboud university medical center, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Physiology, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Liverpool John Moores University, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Introduction: Physical fitness is an important prognostic factor in heart failure (HF). To improve fitness, different types of exercise have been explored, with recent focus on high-intensity interval training (HIT). We comprehensively compared effects of HIT versus continuous training (CT) in HF patients NYHA II-III on physical fitness, cardiovascular function and structure, and quality of life, and hypothesize that HIT leads to superior improvements compared to CT.

Methods: Twenty HF patients (male:female 19:1, 64±8 yrs, ejection fraction 38±6%) were allocated to 12-weeks of HIT (10*1-minute at 90% maximal workload-alternated by 2.5 minutes at 30% maximal workload) or CT (30 minutes at 60-75% of maximal workload). Before and after intervention, we examined physical fitness (incremental cycling test), cardiac function and structure (echocardiography), vascular function and structure (ultrasound) and quality of life (SF-36, Minnesota living with HF questionnaire (MLHFQ)).

Results: Training improved maximal workload, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) related to the predicted VO2peak, oxygen uptake at the anaerobic threshold, and maximal oxygen pulse (all P<0.05), whilst no differences were present between HIT and CT (N.S.). We found no major changes in resting cardiovascular function and structure. SF-36 physical function score improved after training (P<0.05), whilst SF-36 total score and MLHFQ did not change after training (N.S.).

Conclusion: Training induced significant improvements in parameters of physical fitness, although no evidence for superiority of HIT over CT was demonstrated. No major effect of training was found on cardiovascular structure and function or quality of life in HF patients NYHA II-III.

Trial Registration: Nederlands Trial Register NTR3671.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0141256PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4627811PMC
June 2016