Publications by authors named "B M Fredrik Pettersson"

242 Publications

Pre-medical dental evaluation and treatment of oral infection - a survey study among hospital-affiliated dentists in Sweden.

Acta Odontol Scand 2021 Jun 9:1-9. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Section of Oral Biology and Oral Pathology, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.

Objective: To examine how hospital-affiliated dentists assess risk and evaluate oral foci of infection in patients facing certain medical treatments, and whether the nature of upcoming medical treatment affects the choice of dental intervention.

Materials And Methods: A survey comprising six clinical cases (50 teeth) was sent to hospital-affiliated dentists in Sweden. A treatment option for the affected tooth/teeth in each case was selected whether the patient was facing heart valve surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, intravenous bisphosphonate treatment, solid organ transplantation or was diagnosed with endocarditis.

Results: Consensus in choice of dental treatment was high in 62%, moderate in 32% and low in 6% of the assessments. High variability of choice of treatment was seen for eight teeth whereas the remaining 42 teeth often received the same therapy regardless of medical issue. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were thought to entail the highest risk for oral infectious sequelae with a risk ranging from 1% to 100%.

Conclusion: Pre-medical dental evaluations and recommended treatments are often uniform with the exception of the management of asymptomatic root canal treated teeth with persisting apical radiolucency and heavily decayed molars. In many instances, dental diagnosis has a greater impact on choice of treatment than the underlying medical issue and associated implications thereof.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016357.2021.1934535DOI Listing
June 2021

Proposals for continued research to determine older adults' falls risk.

J Frailty Sarcopenia Falls 2020 Dec 1;5(4):89-91. Epub 2020 Dec 1.

Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

Early detection of older adults with an increased risk of falling could enable early onset of preventative measures. Currently used fall risk assessment tools have not proven sufficiently effective in differentiating between high and low fall risk in community-living older adults. There are a number of tests and measures available, but many timed and observation-based tools are performed on a flat floor without interaction with the surrounding. To improve falls prediction, measurements in other areas that challenge mobility in dynamic conditions and that take a persons' own perception of steadiness into account should be further developed and evaluated as single or combined measures. The tools should be easy to apply in clinical practice or used as a self-assessment by the older adults themselves.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.22540/JFSF-05-089DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7711736PMC
December 2020

Neither Timed Up and Go test nor Short Physical Performance Battery predict future falls among independent adults aged ≥75 years living in the community.

J Frailty Sarcopenia Falls 2020 Jun 1;5(2):24-30. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

Objectives: Previous research has shown that balance and gait difficulties are predictors of falls. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of two tools reporting on balance and gait among older community-living adults independent in personal activities of daily living (p-ADL).

Methods: Prospective study design. Baseline assessment included the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Following baseline, falls were recorded monthly for one year by 202 participants (70.1% women) who were independent in p-ADL, and at least 75 years old (79.2±3.5). ROC-curves were made and AUC were calculated.

Results: Forty-seven percent of the participants reported falls. AUCs calculated for TUG were 0.5 (95%CI: 0.5-0.6) for those with at least one fall, and 0.5 (95% CI: 0.5-0.6) for recurrent fallers. Corresponding figures for SPPB were 0.5 (95% CI: 0.5-0.6) and 0.5 (95% CI: 0.5-0.6).

Conclusion: This study does not support a recommendation to use the Timed Up and Go test or the Short Physical Performance Battery as tools for the identification of fall-prone persons among older adults living in the community. These results reinforce the need for further research into appropriate tools for identifying independent but fall-prone older adults.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.22540/JFSF-05-024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7272775PMC
June 2020

Effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme to prevent falls in older community-dwelling adults: study protocol for the Safe Step randomised controlled trial.

BMJ Open 2020 05 17;10(5):e036194. Epub 2020 May 17.

Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

Introduction: Exercise interventions have a strong evidence base for falls prevention. However, exercise can be challenging to implement and often has limited reach and poor adherence. Digital technology provides opportunities for both increased access to the intervention and support over time. Further knowledge needs to be gained regarding the effectiveness of completely self-managed digital exercise interventions. The main objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme, Safe Step, in combination with monthly educational videos with educational videos alone, on falls over 1 year in older community-dwelling adults.

Methods And Analysis: A two-arm parallel randomised controlled trial will be conducted with at least 1400 community-living older adults (70+ years) who experience impaired balance. Participants will be recruited throughout Sweden with enrolment through the project website. They will be randomly allocated to either the Safe Step exercise programme with additional monthly educational videos about healthy ageing and fall prevention, or the monthly education videos alone. Participants receiving the exercise intervention will be asked to exercise at home for at least 30 min, 3 times/week with support of the Safe Step application. The primary outcome will be rate of falls (fall per person year). Participants will keep a fall calendar and report falls at the end of each month through a digital questionnaire. Further assessments of secondary outcomes will be made through self-reported questionnaires and a self-test of 30 s chair stand test at baseline and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after study start. Data will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle.

Ethics And Dissemination: Ethical approval was obtained by The Regional Ethical Review Board in Umeå (Dnr 2018/433-31). Findings will be disseminated through the project web-site, peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences and through senior citizen organisations' newsletters.

Trial Registration Number: NCT03963570.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-036194DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7239551PMC
May 2020

Author Correction: Extensive genomic diversity among Mycobacterium marinum strains revealed by whole genome sequencing.

Sci Rep 2020 Mar 18;10(1):5246. Epub 2020 Mar 18.

Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Box 596, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24, Uppsala, Sweden.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-61218-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7078255PMC
March 2020