Publications by authors named "B L McGraw"

37 Publications

Aerodigestive adverse effects during intravenous pentamidine infusion for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia prophylaxis.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2021 01 26;68(1):e28714. Epub 2020 Sep 26.

Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, Michigan.

Aerodigestive adverse effects (AD-AE) during intravenous pentamidine (IV-P) infusion for Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia prophylaxis are uncommon in retrospective chart review studies. We conducted a survey in patients on IV-P, which included 31 specific questions. Twenty-five patients were included in the analysis; AD-AE were observed in 22 (88%) with recurrence of symptoms in 88% participants with subsequent infusions. Five leading symptoms were congestion (48%), lip tingling (32%), nausea (28%), tongue tingling (24%), vomiting, and throat swelling (17%); multiple symptoms were reported in 72% of the patients. In conclusion, AD-AE of IV-P infusion are common, self-limited, and tend to be recurrent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.28714DOI Listing
January 2021

Cross-sectional analysis of adhesion in individuals with sickle cell disease using a standardized whole blood adhesion bioassay to VCAM-1.

Blood Cells Mol Dis 2020 03 6;81:102397. Epub 2019 Dec 6.

Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, United States of America; Division of Critical Care Medicine, Detroit, MI, United States of America; Department of Physiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, United States of America. Electronic address:

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by frequent and unpredictable vaso-occlusive episodes (VOEs) that lead to severe pain, organ damage, and early death. Lack of reliable biomarkers that objectively define VOEs remains a critical barrier to improving the care for SCD patients. VOEs result from a complex interplay of cell-cell interactions that promote micro-vascular occlusion. Earlier studies demonstrated that sickle erythrocytes are more adherent than non-sickle erythrocytes and established a direct link between adhesion and frequency of VOEs. We developed a standardized, flow-based adhesion bioassay to assess the adhesive properties of SCD blood samples. The current study provides a cross-sectional analysis of steady state adhesion in SCD patients presenting at monthly out-patient hematology visits. Steady state adhesion varied from patient-to-patient. Adhesion positively correlated with reticulocyte percent and WBC count although there was no significant relationship between adhesion and platelets or hemoglobin in this study. Additionally, steady state adhesion indices were significantly lower in SCD subjects receiving hydroxyurea therapy when compared to the untreated group. The well-plate based microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay described in this report may provide a platform to identify SCD subjects with severe disease phenotypes, predict impending VOEs, and monitor response to current and developing therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bcmd.2019.102397DOI Listing
March 2020

Comparison of partial replacement of fishmeal with soybean meal and EnzoMeal on growth performance of Asian seabass Lates calcarifer.

Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol 2019 Feb 9;216:29-37. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

College of Science and Engineering, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia. Electronic address:

This study explored the impact of fishmeal replacement by commercial soybean meal (SM) and EnzoMeal (EZM) on Asian seabass Lates calcarifer growth performance using six diets. The six diets comprised two sources of plant proteins with three levels each, including 300 g kg soybean meal (SM30), 300 g kg EnzoMeal (EZM30), 400 g kg soybean meal (SM40), 400 g kg EnzoMeal (EZM40), 500 g kg soybean meal (SM50), and 500 g kg EnzoMeal (EZM50). The soybean level was shown to significantly affect the final fish weight, weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR), survival, feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR), and apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC). Further, the plant meal type significantly affected the final weight, weight gain, feed intake, ADC, and body lipid content. The highest final weight was observed in the SM30 group, and the lowest final weight was in the EZM50 group. Fish fed EZM had lower body weight than those fed soybean meal at the same inclusion level. However, once the fish had adapted to the EZM diet the fish weight variation was low. At the 300 g kg and 400 g kg inclusion levels the fish fed EZM showed significantly higher ADC than those fed soybean. The pepsin activity of fish fed EZM at 300 g kg and 400 g kg was higher than those fed soybean meal at the same levels. The enterocyte height in the hindgut of fish fed SM40 and SM50 was significantly higher than those fed EZM40 and EZM50, respectively. This study indicates that EZM could be a potential source of plant protein to replace fishmeal in fish feed as it contains high protein and low anti-nutritional factors. However, the major endpoint measurements on fish performance suggest that low feed intake constrains further EZM inclusion beyond 300 g kg in the diet.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpc.2018.10.006DOI Listing
February 2019

Detection of Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Turfgrass Canopy Activity With the Use of a Novel Fluorescent Marking System Suggests Opportunities for Improved Mechanical Control.

Environ Entomol 2018 12;47(6):1525-1531

Department of Plant Science, Pennsylvania State University, 243 Agricultural Sciences and Industries Building, University Park, PA.

The annual bluegrass weevil, Listronotus maculicollis Kirby, is a severe pest of short-mown turfgrasses in eastern North America. Previous research has demonstrated that adults can be removed from golf course putting greens during mowing. However, the impact of mechanical control on adult removal diminishes with increases in mowing height. Therefore, to optimize adult removal we sought to describe adult presence on top of the turfgrass canopy to identify periods when mowing would be most effective. Growth chamber studies using time-lapse photography revealed that greatest activity occurred between 15 and 20°C, with few weevils active on the surface when temperatures were less than 10°C. A mark-release technique combining fluorescent marks with still photography was used to assess adult movement in the field. This novel mark-recapture system confirmed laboratory findings that adult activity on top of the turfgrass canopy was greatest during the day and strongly correlated with temperature early in the season (April, May). However, adult presence on the surface in early summer was greatest briefly after sunrise, then declined during the mid-morning when temperatures exceeded 21°C. The effect of temperature on surface activity was best described by a second-order polynomial function, which predicts maximum adult surface activity between 14 and 17°C. Our findings suggest that adult surface activity is strongly associated with temperature and not photophase, and therefore, monitoring populations and scheduling mowing with the intent to remove adults need to be adjusted seasonally with changes in temperature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ee/nvy156DOI Listing
December 2018

Mowing Height Influences Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Oviposition Behavior and Mechanical Removal From Golf Course Putting Greens, but Not Larval Development.

J Econ Entomol 2017 10;110(5):2165-2171

Department of Plant Science, Pennsylvania State University, 243 Agricultural Sciences and Industries Bldg., University Park, PA 16802.

The annual bluegrass weevil, Listronotus maculicollis (Kirby), is a highly destructive pest of golf course turfgrass in eastern North America. Previous research has demonstrated that females prefer to oviposit within short-mown turfgrasses (<1.25 cm), and these offspring have improved fitness traits compared with larvae developing in higher-mowed turf. However, damage to putting green turf (<3.55 mm) is rarely reported. We investigated whether this phenomenon was due to adult removal through mowing or an inability of larvae to develop within a shortened plant. Greenhouse studies revealed that between 26% and 38% of adults were removed when turf was mowed at 2.54 mm (0.100 in), but the effect diminished with increasing mowing heights. The majority of adults survived mowing, indicating a potential for adults to reinvade turf stands adjacent to areas where grass clippings are discarded. Females oviposited in all mowing height treatments in laboratory and field experiments. However, behavior was influenced by plant height, as significantly fewer eggs were placed inside of the turfgrass stem at the lowest mowing height. Larval development was not affected by egg placement or turf height, and significant numbers of larvae were capable of developing to damaging stages (fourth- and fifth-instar larvae) in all treatments. Our findings suggest that L. maculicollis poses a threat to putting green-height turf, but the probability of damage occurring and need for insecticide applications may be lessened on low-mown surfaces. Future studies are needed to determine factors that influence L. maculicollis movement within the turfgrass canopy to optimize mechanical control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jee/tox192DOI Listing
October 2017
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