Publications by authors named "B L Kumawat"

72 Publications

An interplay of resource availability, population size and mutation rate potentiates the evolution of metabolic signaling.

BMC Ecol Evol 2021 04 7;21(1):52. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Department of Molecular Reproduction, Development and Genetics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012, India.

Background: Asexually reproducing populations of single cells evolve through mutation, natural selection, and genetic drift. Environmental conditions in which the evolution takes place define the emergent fitness landscapes. In this work, we used Avida-a digital evolution framework-to uncover a hitherto unexplored interaction between mutation rates, population size, and the relative abundance of metabolizable resources, and its effect on evolutionary outcomes in small populations of digital organisms.

Results: Over each simulation, the population evolved to one of several states, each associated with a single dominant phenotype with its associated fitness and genotype. For a low mutation rate, acquisition of fitness by organisms was accompanied with, and dependent on, an increase in rate of genomic replication. At an increased mutation rate, phenotypes with high fitness values were similarly achieved through enhanced genome replication rates. In addition, we also observed the frequent emergence of suboptimal fitness phenotype, wherein neighboring organisms signaled to each other information relevant to performing metabolic tasks. This metabolic signaling was vital to fitness acquisition and was correlated with greater genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity in the population. The frequency of appearance of signaling populations increased with population size and with resource abundance.

Conclusions: Our results reveal a minimal set of environment-genotype interactions that lead to the emergence of metabolic signaling within evolving populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-021-01782-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8028831PMC
April 2021

Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia with Mental Impairment, Thin Corpus Callosum and Amyotrophy: A Road Map to SPG11 Contributors.

Ann Indian Acad Neurol 2020 May-Jun;23(3):384-386. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

Department of Neurology, SMS Medical College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/aian.AIAN_385_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7313566PMC
June 2020

Juvenile Onset Niemann-Pick Type C Disease with Refractory Seizures.

Ann Indian Acad Neurol 2019 Oct-Dec;22(4):539-540. Epub 2019 Oct 25.

Department of Neurology, S.M.S. Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/aian.AIAN_292_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6839306PMC
October 2019

Plasma Exchange as a First Line Therapy in Acute Attacks of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders.

Ann Indian Acad Neurol 2019 Oct-Dec;22(4):389-394. Epub 2019 Oct 25.

Department of Neurology, SMS Medical College, Jaipur, Rajeshthan, India.

Background And Aims: Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a demyelinating disorder of central nervous system with deleterious effects. At present Intravenous corticosteroids are used for the relapse as the first line of treatment, but with only a class evidence III-IV. Having an underlying humoral immune mechanism in the pathogenesis of NMOSD and as it is rightly said that "Time is Cord and Eyes", delaying the time to start plasma exchange (PLEX) awaiting favorable outcome in response to corticosteroids is detrimental for the patient. Hence, PLEX may be a promising first line therapeutic approach in the management of severe attacks of NMOSD. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of PLEX as the first line of treatment for the acute attacks in patients with NMOSD that is being largely used as an add-on therapy for more than 10 years, and also to define the time opportunity window for the starting of PLEX.

Methods: The study analysed the therapeutic efficacy and safety profile of PLEX as a first line therapy in 30 patients diagnosed with NMOSD over a period of 30 months. PLEX was performed using a Hemonetics Mobile Collection System plus machine with due written consent including the risks and benefits of the treatment that is being proposed to the patient/relative in their own language.

Results: A total of 30 patients were analysed, out of which 16 were females and rest males. 85% of the patients were in the age group of 25-35 years. All the patients had severe Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores at the baseline, and 73.33% showed significant improvement following PLEX. The only predictor of good outcome was the time to PLEX i.e shorter delay betters the outcome.

Conclusion: The study ascertained the importance of early PLEX as a therapeutic intervention in severe attacks of NMOSD irrespective of their Anti-Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) antibody status.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/aian.AIAN_365_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6839304PMC
October 2019

Central nervous system blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukaemia misdiagnosed as tubercular meningitis.

BMJ Case Rep 2018 Jun 12;2018. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Department of Neurology, Sawai Mansingh Medical College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.

Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) presenting with isolated Central Nervous System (CNS) blast crisis is an uncommon entity. A 22-year-old man, diagnosed with chronic phase CML in 2011 and was in haematological and cytogenetic remission until July 2016, had acute onset headache and vomiting with meningeal signs and was admitted elsewhere, investigated by brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and suspected to have tubercular meningitis, for which steroids and antitubercular medications were started. The patient's sensorium further deteriorated, and Ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery was done for hydrocephalus by a neurosurgeon. After 2 months of the illness, he was admitted to our hospital with a persistent headache, vomiting and altered sensorium. CSF for cytospin confirmed myeloid blasts. He was still in haematological remission. So, a diagnosis of isolated CNS blast crisis was made. The patient was started on triple intrathecal chemotherapy and cranial radiotherapy. He had improvement with treatment and is still in remission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2017-223923DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6011440PMC
June 2018