Publications by authors named "B J Huizinga"

16 Publications

SHEA neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) white paper series: Practical approaches to disease prevention.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2020 11 14;41(11):1251-1257. Epub 2020 Sep 14.

Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2020.51DOI Listing
November 2020

Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of microbial consortia from a biogenic gas field in Alaska's Cook Inlet basin.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2012 May 16;78(10):3599-605. Epub 2012 Mar 16.

Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Filter-collected production water samples from a methane-rich gas field in the Cook Inlet basin of Alaska were investigated using whole-cell rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA tag pyrosequencing. Both techniques were consistent in determining the microbial community composition, including the archaeal or bacterial dominance of samples. The archaeal community is dominated by the obligate methylotrophic methanogen genus Methanolobus as well as the nutritional generalist methanogen genus Methanosarcina, which is capable of utilizing acetate, CO(2), and methyl-bearing compounds. The most-abundant bacterial groups are Firmicutes, notably of the Acetobacterium genus, and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides species (CFBs) affiliated with the order Bacteroidales. We observed spatial variation among samples in both the percentage of members of Archaea compared to that of members of Bacteria and the dominant members of the bacterial community, differences which could not be explained with the available geochemical data. Based upon the microbial community composition and the isotopic signature of methane associated with the Cook Inlet basin site, we propose a simplified reaction network beginning with the breakdown of coal macromolecules, followed by fermentation and methylotrophic and acetoclastic methane production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.07122-11DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3346356PMC
May 2012

Field and laboratory studies on the bioconversion of coal to methane in the San Juan Basin.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2012 Jul 11;81(1):26-42. Epub 2012 Jan 11.

Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA.

The bioconversion of coal to methane in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, was investigated. Production waters were analyzed via enrichment studies, metabolite-profiling, and culture-independent methods. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the presence of methanogens potentially capable of acetoclastic, hydrogenotrophic, and methylotrophic metabolisms, predominantly belonging to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales. Incubations of produced water and coal readily produced methane, but there was no correlation between the thermal maturity and methanogenesis. Coal methanogenesis was greater when samples with a greater richness of Firmicutes were utilized. A greater archaeal diversity was observed in the presence of several aromatic and short-chain fatty acid metabolites. Incubations amended with lactate, hydrogen, formate, and short-chain alcohols produced methane above un-amended controls. Methanogenesis from acetate was not observed. Metabolite profiling showed the widespread occurrence of putative aromatic ring intermediates including benzoate, toluic acids, phthalic acids, and cresols. The detection of saturated and unsaturated alkylsuccinic acids indicated n-alkane and cyclic alkane/alkene metabolism. Microarray analysis complemented observations based on hybridization to functional genes related to the anaerobic metabolism of aromatic and aliphatic substrates. These data suggest that coal methanogenesis is unlikely to be limited by methanogen biomass, but rather the activation and degradation of coal constituents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2011.01272.xDOI Listing
July 2012

Comparison of ultrasonography and physical examination in the diagnosis of incisional hernia in a prospective study.

Hernia 2012 Feb 11;16(1):53-7. Epub 2011 Aug 11.

VieCuri Medical Centre of Northern Limburg, Venlo, The Netherlands.

Purpose: Incisional hernia is a frequent complication of abdominal surgery (incidence 2-20%). Diagnosis by physical examination is sometimes difficult, especially in small incisional hernias or in obese patients. The additional diagnostic value of standardized ultrasonography was evaluated in this prospective study.

Methods: A total of 456 patients participating in a randomized trial comparing two suture materials for closure of the abdominal fascia underwent physical examination and ultrasonography at 6-month intervals. Wound complaints and treatment of incisional hernia were also noted. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests (SPSS). Interest variability analysis was performed.

Results: During a median follow-up of 31 months, 103 incisional hernias were found. A total of 82 incisional hernias were found by physical examination and an additional 21 with ultrasonography. Six of these additional hernias were symptomatic and only one of the additional hernias received operative treatment. The false-negative rates for physical examination and ultrasonography were 25.3 and 24.4%, respectively. Interest variability was low, with a Kappa of 0.697 (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: There are no clear diagnostic criteria for incisional hernia available in the literature. Standardized combination of ultrasonography with physical examination during follow-up yields a significant number of, mostly asymptomatic, hernias, which would not be found using physical examination alone. This is especially relevant in research settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10029-011-0865-2DOI Listing
February 2012

Randomized clinical trial comparing polypropylene or polydioxanone for midline abdominal wall closure.

Br J Surg 2011 May 19;98(5):633-9. Epub 2011 Jan 19.

Department of General Surgery, Orbis Medical Centre, PO Box 5500, 6130 MB Sittard, The Netherlands.

Background: Incisional hernia is a frequent complication of abdominal surgery, often requiring surgical intervention. This prospective randomized trial compared suture materials for closure of the fascia after abdominal surgery.

Methods: In 456 patients the abdominal fascia was closed with either non-absorbable (polypropylene; Prolene(®)) or absorbable (polydioxanone; PDS(®)) suture material. Follow-up was by clinical examination and ultrasonography at 6-month intervals. Outcome measures were incisional hernia, surgical-site infection and suture sinus.

Results: Some 223 patients were analysed after closure with Prolene(®) and 233 after PDS(®) . Median follow-up was 32 and 31 months respectively. There was no significant difference in the incidence of incisional hernia between the groups: 20·2 per cent (45 of 223) for Prolene(®) and 24·9 per cent (58 of 233) with PDS(®) (P = 0·229). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a cumulative rate after 4 years of 23·7 and 30·2 per cent for Prolene(®) and PDS(®) respectively (P = 0·222). Secondary outcome measures showed no significant differences.

Conclusion: The incidence of incisional hernia in both groups was higher than expected from previous literature. There were no significant differences between the two suture methods.

Registration Number: ISRCTN65599814 (http://www.clinical-trials.com).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bjs.7398DOI Listing
May 2011
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