Publications by authors named "B Huppertz"

230 Publications

Placental Villous Explant Culture 2.0: Flow Culture Allows Studies Closer to the In Vivo Situation.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Jul 12;22(14). Epub 2021 Jul 12.

Division of Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Gottfried Schatz Research Center, Medical University of Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria.

During pregnancy, freely floating placental villi are adapted to fluid shear stress due to placental perfusion with maternal plasma and blood. In vitro culture of placental villous explants is widely performed under static conditions, hoping the conditions may represent the in utero environment. However, static placental villous explant culture dramatically differs from the in vivo situation. Thus, we established a flow culture system for placental villous explants and compared commonly used static cultured tissue to flow cultured tissue using transmission and scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) measurements. The data revealed a better structural and biochemical integrity of flow cultured tissue compared to static cultured tissue. Thus, this new flow system can be used to simulate the blood flow from the mother to the placenta and back in the most native-like in vitro system so far and thus can enable novel study designs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22147464DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8308011PMC
July 2021

Molecular characteristics of established trophoblast-derived cell lines.

Placenta 2021 May 4;108:122-133. Epub 2021 Mar 4.

Placenta Lab, Department of Obstetrics, Jena University Hospital, 07747, Jena, Germany. Electronic address:

Introduction: Research on human placental development and function lacks a conclusive in vivo model. To investigate the intracellular molecular mechanisms in trophoblast cells, different cell lines have been established during the last decades. So far, none of these accomplishes all features of primary trophoblast, thus their suitability as well as the transferability of the results has been discussed. The aim of this study is to assess molecular markers and features matching different trophoblast subpopulations in trophoblastic cell lines to provide orientation on their suitability and relevance for distinct research questions.

Methods: The commonly used trophoblastic cell lines, BeWo, JEG-3, HTR-8/SVneo, AC1-M59, AC1-M32, ACH-3P and Swan71 were selected. qPCR and immunoblotting were used to determine expression of characteristic molecular markers. C14MC, C19MC and miR-371-3 miRNA expression were investigated by real time PCR. Proliferation, migration and network stabilization assays were performed. Hormone secretion was determined by chemiluminescent-immunoassays. DNA profiles were obtained by Short Tandem Repeat (STR)-genotyping.

Results: Immortalized cell lines differ from choriocarcinoma-derived ones in the expression of HLA-G, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, VE-cadherin, cadherin-11, cytokeratin 7, vimentin, ADAM12 and PRG2. Compared to choriocarcinoma-derived cell lines, expression of C19MC and hormone secretion were almost absent in immortalized cell lines. Conversely, they express C14MC and exhibit higher migration and network stabilization.

Discussion: The data presented will help justify the use of a cell line to evaluate distinct features of trophoblast biology and pathology. In general, characteristics and markers of choriocarcinoma derived cell lines seem to be more similar to in vivo trophoblast than immortalized cell lines and thus might be regarded as more suitable models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.placenta.2021.02.022DOI Listing
May 2021

The endogenous exposome of the pregnant mother: Placental extracellular vesicles and their effect on the maternal system.

Mol Aspects Med 2021 Feb 18:100955. Epub 2021 Feb 18.

Division of Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Gottfried Schatz Research Center, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. Electronic address:

During pregnancy, there is an intense crosstalk between mother and placenta. During the entire time of pregnancy, the maternal system deals with a huge amount of foreign (fetal) material released from the placenta, which can be referred to as placental exposome. Besides the release of hormones and growth factors, the placenta releases a variety of extracellular vesicles into maternal blood. These vesicles contain specific molecules including proteins, lipids, DNA as well as miRNA, all of which may have specific sites and modes of action on maternal cells. During normal pregnancy, the fine-tuning of factors and vesicles helps maintaining a viable and healthy pregnancy. However, in pregnancy pathologies such as preeclampsia, quantity and quality of the placenta-derived vesicles are altered leading to a deleterious effect on the maternal vascular system. This review focuses on the different types of placenta-derived extracellular vesicles in pregnancy with special emphasis on the interplay between these placental vesicles and the maternal system. Additionally, it displays new techniques and ideas for the analysis of the placental exposome with placental extracellular vesicles as a key aspect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mam.2021.100955DOI Listing
February 2021

Perinatal Derivatives: Where Do We Stand? A Roadmap of the Human Placenta and Consensus for Tissue and Cell Nomenclature.

Front Bioeng Biotechnol 2020 17;8:610544. Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Department of Life Science and Public Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy.

Progress in the understanding of the biology of perinatal tissues has contributed to the breakthrough revelation of the therapeutic effects of perinatal derivatives (PnD), namely birth-associated tissues, cells, and secreted factors. The significant knowledge acquired in the past two decades, along with the increasing interest in perinatal derivatives, fuels an urgent need for the precise identification of PnD and the establishment of updated consensus criteria policies for their characterization. The aim of this review is not to go into detail on preclinical or clinical trials, but rather we address specific issues that are relevant for the definition/characterization of perinatal cells, starting from an understanding of the development of the human placenta, its structure, and the different cell populations that can be isolated from the different perinatal tissues. We describe where the cells are located within the placenta and their cell morphology and phenotype. We also propose nomenclature for the cell populations and derivatives discussed herein. This review is a joint effort from the COST SPRINT Action (CA17116), which broadly aims at approaching consensus for different aspects of PnD research, such as providing inputs for future standards for the processing and characterization and clinical application of PnD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fbioe.2020.610544DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7773933PMC
December 2020
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