Publications by authors named "Bünyamin Kaplan"

20 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cytogenetic damage of radiotherapy in long-term head and neck cancer survivors.

Int J Radiat Biol 2016 07 26;92(7):364-70. Epub 2016 Apr 26.

e Department of Radiation Oncology , Erciyes University Medical School , Kayseri ;

Purpose: To evaluate cytogenetic damage of radiotherapy (RT) and chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in long-term head and neck cancer survivors.

Materials And Methods: This study included 20 patients treated with RT (10 patients) or CRT (10 patients) for head and neck cancer. Nine healthy volunteers were included as control subjects. Cytochalasin B-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to evaluate cytogenetic damage. To evaluate micronucleus (MN) by CBMN, the venous blood samples were drawn median 68 months (range 60-239 months) after the completion of treatment (RT or CRT) for head and neck cancer.

Results: Nuclear division index (NDI) and number of MN in mononuclear and binuclear lymphocytes were significantly higher in patients with head and neck cancer than in control subjects [1.19 (1.08-1.47) vs. 1.07 (1.04-1.14), p < 0.001; 11.0 (2.0-22.0) vs. 1.0 (0-3.0), p < 0.001 and 15.0 (5.0-45.0) vs. 9.0 (2.0-15.0), p = 0.020, respectively]. NDI and number of MN in mononuclear lymphocytes were significantly lower in control subjects compared patients received CRT and those received only RT, but there was no significant difference between patients received CRT and those received only RT. Number of MN in binuclear lymphocytes was significantly lower in control subjects compared to patients received CRT, but there was no significant difference between control subjects and those received only RT. Also there was no significant difference between patients received CRT and those received only RT in terms of number of MN in binuclear lymphocytes.

Conclusions: MN frequency of mononuclear and binuclear lymphocytes in medical follow-up of patients with head and neck cancer after RT could be important in evaluating cytogenetic damage of RT. However, further investigations are needed to provide quantitative correlations between MN yields and the clinical features in post-radiotherapy period.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09553002.2016.1175680DOI Listing
July 2016

Effect on long-term survival of psychiatric disorder, inflammation, malnutrition, and radiotherapy-related toxicity in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

J BUON 2015 May-Jun;20(3):886-93

Department of Radiation Oncology, Kayseri Education and Research Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey.

Purpose: To evaluate the effects on the long-term survival of psychiatric disorders, inflammation, malnutrition, and radiotherapy (RT)-related toxicity in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

Methods: Included were 47 patients who received RT for non-metastatic locally advanced head and neck cancer. The diagnosis of psychiatric disorder was made by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders (4th edn) (DSM-IV) criteria. Malnutrition was defined as weight loss >5% of baseline during RT. Interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). RT-related acute toxicity was evaluated once a week using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTC) version 2.0.

Results: The mean patient age was 57.3±11.4 years (range 33-80); 42 (89.4%) patients were male. Mean disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 53 and 55 months, respectively. Mean DFS was significantly lower in patients with psychiatric disorder compared with those without (35 vs 59 months, p=0.013) and the same applied for mean OS (41 vs 61 months, p=0.008). There was no significant difference between patients with and without malnutrition in terms of OS. Similarly, no significant difference was seen between patients with and without RT-related toxicities in terms of OS. Age, psychiatric disorder, T status, and stage differed significantly between these groups (p<0.10) in univariate analysis. The multivariate Cox regression analysis identified that the OS was significantly associated only with psychiatric disorder (odds ratio/OR: 3.22, 95% confidence interval/CI: 1.29-8.41, p=0.013).

Conclusion: Psychiatric disorders had unfavorable effects on OS in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Inflammation, malnutrition and RT-related toxicity had no significant impact on OS.
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August 2015

Is Human Kallikrein 11 in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated Chemoradiotherapy Associated with Survival?

Cancer Res Treat 2016 Jan 13;48(1):98-105. Epub 2015 Mar 13.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, Kayseri, Turkey.

Purpose: Involvement of human kallikreins (hKs) in human cancers has been reported and several hKs are promising biomarkers of various cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of hK11 expression in patients with non-metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Materials And Methods: The study included 44 patients with NSCLC. hK11 expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining.

Results: The estimation of disease-free and overall survival by Kaplan-Meier was 11 months and 17 months, respectively. The estimation of overall survival by Kaplan-Meier was significantly higher in patients with hK11 strongly positive (2+) than in those with hK11 weakly positive (1+) (20 months vs. 11 months, p=0.032). Although not statistically different, the estimation of disease-free survival by Kaplan-Meier was higher in patients with hK11 strongly positive (2+) than in those with hK11 weakly positive (1+) (12 months vs. 9 months, p=0.113). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the overall survival rates were significantly associated with response to chemoradiotherapy and the degree of staining with hK11.

Conclusion: The stronger hK11 expression in NSCLC appears to be associated with better survival rates. hK11 may be a prognostic biomarker of NSCLC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4143/crt.2014.364DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4720107PMC
January 2016

Prognostic value of SPARC expression in unresectable NSCLC treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014 ;15(20):8911-6

Department of Radiation Oncology, Sutcu Imam University Medical Faculty, Kahramanmaras, Turkey E-mail :

Background: The aim of the present study was to determine the predictive/prognostic value of the secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) in cases of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer.

Materials And Methods: The study included 84 patients with Stage IIIA-B non-small cell lung cancer, undergoing simultaneous chemoradiotherapy including radiotherapy at a dose of 66 Gy and weekly docataxel (20 mg/m2) and cisplatin (20 mg/m2). SPARC expression was studied in biopsy material by immunohistochemical methods and correlations with treatment responses or survival were evaluated.

Results: Median overall survival was 16±2.73 (11.55-20.46) months for low expression vs 7±1.79 months (7.92-16.08) months for high expression (p=0.039), while median local control was 13±2.31 (8.48-17.5) months for low expression vs 6±0.85 (4.34-7.66) months for high expression (p=0.045) and median progression-free survival was 10±2.31 (5.48-14.5) months for low expression vs 6±1.10 (3.85-8.15) months for high expression (p=0.022). In both univariate and multivariate analyses, high SPARC expression was associated with significantly shorter overall survival (p=0.003, p=0.007, respectively), local control (p=0.008, p=0.036) and progression-free survival (p=0.004, p=0.029) when compared to low SPARC expression. No significant difference was detected between high and low SPARC expression groups regarding age, sex, T stage, N stage, histopathology and stage-related patient characteristics.

Conclusions: High SPARC expression was identified as a poor prognostic factor in cases with locally advanced NSCLC treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2014.15.20.8911DOI Listing
July 2015

Lack of sunlight exposure influence on primary glioblastoma survival.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014 ;15(10):4165-8

Department of Medical Oncology, Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Antalya, Turkey E-mail :

Background: The prognosis of primary glioblastoma (GBM) is poor. Approximately 2/3 of primary brain tumor diagnoses are GBM, of which 95% are primary lesions. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether more sunlight exposure has an effect on survival of patients with primary GBM.

Materials And Methods: A total of 111 patients with primary GBM were enrolled from Kayseri in inner Anatolia which has a cold climate (n: 40) and Mersin in Mediterranean region with a warm climate and more sunlight exposure (n: 71). The patients with primary GBM were divided into two groups as Kayseri and Mersin and compared for progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).

Results: The PFS values were 7.0 and 4.7 months for Kayseri and Mersin groups, respectively (p=0.10) and the respective OS values were 13.3 and 9.4 months (p=0.13). We did not found any significant difference regarding age, sex, comorbidity, smoking, surgery, resurgery, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy and palliative chemotherapy between the groups.

Conclusions: We found that more sunlight exposure had no impact on prognosis of patients with primary GBM, adding inconsistency to the literature about the relationship between sunlight and GBM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2014.15.10.4165DOI Listing
May 2015

ABO blood groups are not associated with treatment response and prognosis in patients with local advanced non- small cell lung cancer.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2013 ;14(6):3945-8

Department of Radiation Oncology, Kayseri Education and Research Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey.

Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, late diagnosis being the main obstacle to improving the outcomes with stage at diagnosis as an important prognostic factor. Relationships between ABO blood groups and risk of benign or malignant diseases have been observed and in this study, we aimed to investigate whether they might affect prognosis and response to chemoradiotherapy in patients with local advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Materials And Methods: Eighty-one patients with non-metastatic local advanced NSCLC were included in the study. ABO blood groups were A in 45 (55.6%), B in 7 (8.6%), AB in 8 (9.9%), and O in 21 (25.9%) patients. The patients were also divided two groups according to blood group A (45 patients) and non-A (B, AB and O; 36 patients). Response to chemoradiotherapy was complete remission in 10 (12.3%), disease regression in 42 (51.9%), stable disease in 12 (14.8%), and disease progression in 17 (21.0%) patients.

Results: There was no significant difference among ABO blood group categories or between patients with A blood group and those with non-A blood group in terms of responses to chemoradiotherapy (p>0.05). There were also no significant differences regarding overall and disease-free survival rates.

Conclusion: The ABO blood group system has no significant effect on prognosis and response to chemoradiotherapy in patients with non-metastatic NSCLC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2013.14.6.3945DOI Listing
February 2014

Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin followed by consolidation chemotherapy in locally advanced unresectable non-small cell lung cancer.

Ann Thorac Med 2013 Apr;8(2):109-15

Department of Radiation Oncology, Erciyes University, School of Medicine, Kayseri, Turkey.

Objectives: To evaluate treatment results and toxicities in patients who received concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by consolidation with docetaxel and cisplatin in locally advanced unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Methods: Ninety three patients were included in this retrospective study. The patients received 66 Gy radiotherapy and weekly 20 mg/m(2) docetaxel and 20 mg/m(2) cisplatin chemotherapy concomitantly. One month later than the end of CRT, consolidation chemotherapy with four cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) and cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) were administered at each 21 days.

Results: Median age of the patients was 57 (range, 30-74). Following concomitant CRT, 14 patients (15%) showed complete and 50 patients (54%) showed partial response (total response rate was 69%). The median follow-up was 13 months (range: 2-51 months). The median overall survival was 18 months (95% confidential interval [CI]: 13.8-22.1 months); local control was 15 months (95% CI: 9.3-20.6 months); progression-free survival was 9 months (95% CI: 6.5-11.4 months). Esophagitis in eight (9%) patients, neutropenia in seven (8%) patients and pneumonitis in eight (9%) patients developed as grade III-IV toxicity due to concomitant CRT.

Conclusion: Concomitant CRT with docetaxel and cisplatin followed by docetaxel and cisplatin consolidation chemotherapy might be considered as a feasible, and well tolerated treatment modality with high response rates despite the fact that it has not a survival advantage in patients with locally advanced unresectable NSCLC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1817-1737.109824DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3667439PMC
April 2013

The MRI findings of iris metastasis in patients with breast cancer.

Acta Inform Med 2012 Dec;20(4):259-60

Department of Medical Oncology, Acıbadem Kayseri Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey.

Breast cancer and lung cancer are the most common tumors that metastasize to iris. The metastasis of iris was generally diagnosed on ophthalmologic examination. In this case, we reported iris metastasis of patients with adenocarcinoma of breast cancer and MRI findings. We report a case of a 51-year-old. She was diagnosed breast cancer two years ago. After adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and trastuzumab, she was admitted to hospital with the complaints of headache on February 2012. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI ) revealed multiple brain metastasis. Whole brain radiotherapy and palliative chemotherapy were applied to the patients. In follow-up, on ophthalmological examination, there was a solid lesion on iris. The orbital MRI was performed and it revealed the thickness on iris of left eye. After diagnostic procedure final pathological rewiev reported that invasive ductal carcinom metastasis. Iris metastasis may be considered by MRI findings following: The thickness on iris and contrast enhanced lesion. This reason may be resulted that the fine niddle aspiration biopsy for diagnosis of iris metastasis is not need.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5455/aim.2012.20.259-260DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3558288PMC
December 2012

Prealbumin is a more sensitive marker than albumin to assess the nutritional status in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

Contemp Oncol (Pozn) 2013 28;17(3):276-80. Epub 2013 Jun 28.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, Kayseri, Turkey.

Aim Of The Study: The aim of this prospective study was to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and to evaluate a more sensitive marker to assess the nutritional status in patients undergoing RT for head and neck cancer.

Material And Methods: The prospective study included 51 (mean age of 57.6 ±11.2 years) patients undergoing RT for head and neck cancer. Malnutrition was defined as weight loss > 5% of baseline.

Results: Forty-six (90.2%) of 51 patients were male. Malnutrition developed in 33 (64.7%) patients during RT. Mean prealbumin level was significantly lower in patients with malnutrition than in those without malnutrition (17 ±5 g/dl vs. 22 ±5 g/dl, respectively, p = 0.004). On the other hand, there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of other nutrition parameters including total protein, albumin, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose (p > 0.05). The percentage of weight loss negatively correlated with prealbumin (r = -0.430, p = 0.002), but not with other nutrition parameters including total protein, albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and glucose (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: The prevalence of malnutrition was high in patients with head and neck cancer. Prealbumin was a more sensitive marker than albumin to assess the nutritional status in these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/wo.2013.35281DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934060PMC
March 2014

The experience of symptoms and information needs of cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

J Cancer Educ 2012 Mar;27(1):46-53

Erciyes University Halil Bayraktar Health Services Vocational College, Kayseri, Turkey.

The aim was to determine the symptoms and information needs of cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). The study population consisted of 345 RT patients accrued over 6 months. Patients' needs for information, sources of information, levels of satisfaction with information, symptoms and demographic factors were assessed by questionnaire and personal interview. Chi-square tests were used to test the correlation between patient variables and information needs/experiences. Most patients (80.9%) experienced RT side effects--fatigue, nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite were the most frequent. More than half of the patients had not received information about RT; however, patients (83.2%) who had problems during the treatment wanted to have information (P < 0.05). The majority of the patients receiving information identified doctors as the primary source. The patients' prioritized needs for information were all the aspects of their diagnosis and treatment and side effects of RT. Overall, the results indicate that most patients require information about their treatment and also experienced a variety of symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13187-011-0254-7DOI Listing
March 2012

Whole abdominal field versus standard field radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer.

J Radiat Res 2011 19;52(2):168-75. Epub 2011 Feb 19.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, Kayseri, Turkey.

Purpose: To compare standard radiotherapy field (SRTF) with whole abdomen irradiation (WAI), used in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy following curative surgery in patients with gastric cancer.

Methods And Material: Ninety patients were included in the study and divided into two treatment arms. In the first treatment arm, SRTF, including 45 Gy radiation to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes, was performed in 45 patients. In the second treatment arm, a total of 45.2 Gy RT was delivered; 20 Gy to the whole abdomen followed by 25.2 Gy RT to the tumor and regional lymph nodes, in 45 patients. An intravenous bolus dose of 250 mg/m(2)/week 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was administered concomitantly with RT in both treatment arms. Patients who completed concomitant chemoradiotherapy, received adjuvant treatment, including 4 cycles of 5-FU (425 mg/m(2)) and folinic acid (20 mg/m(2)) in 4 week intervals.

Results: Median age was 56 years (range: 22-81), 89% of the patients (n = 80) had serosal involvement, 78% (n = 70) were node positive. The rate of hematological (40% vs. 16%, p = 0.010) and gastrointestinal toxicities (80% vs. 53%, p = 0.010) were higher, and performance loss (60% vs. 29%, p = 0.003) was greater in the second treatment arm. Number of patients who experienced Grade 3 and Grade 4 gastrointestinal toxicities (especially diarrhea) were higher in the second treatment arm (4% vs. 16%, p = 0.049). The median follow-up was 19 months (range: 7-96). The median 5-year survival was 29% and 17%, locoregional control was 30% and 25%, and disease-free survival was 27% and 16% in the first and second treatment arms, respectively. There was no significant difference between the treatment groups in terms of survival, locoregional control and disease-free survival rates (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: Whole abdomen irradiation was not found to be superior to standard field radiotherapy used in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy in gastric cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1269/jrr.10075DOI Listing
July 2011

Zoledronic acid concurrent with either high- or reduced-dose palliative radiotherapy in the management of the breast cancer patients with bone metastases: a phase IV randomized clinical study.

Support Care Cancer 2010 Jun 31;18(6):691-8. Epub 2009 May 31.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Ankara 06100, Turkey.

Introduction: In this prospective study, the efficacy and safety of radiotherapy combined with zoledronic acid was evaluated.

Materials And Methods: Breast cancer patients with painful bone metastases were randomized to either high- or reduced-dose radiotherapy. All patients received zoledronic acid (4 mg) every 28 days from the beginning of radiotherapy. Analgesic and pain scores in addition to visual analog score (VAS) for treatment satisfaction and whole-body bone scintigraphy were evaluated.

Results And Conclusion: No significant differences could be found in analgesic or pain scores and bone scintigraphy results between the groups. Our results suggest that reduced-dose radiotherapy produces similar response rates and response durations when used concomitantly with zoledronic acid.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-009-0663-xDOI Listing
June 2010

Patterns of care for lung cancer in radiation oncology departments of Turkey.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2008 Dec 15;72(5):1530-7. Epub 2008 Aug 15.

Dokuz Eylul University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir, Turkey.

Purpose: To determine the patterns of care for lung cancer in Turkish radiation oncology centers.

Methods And Materials: Questionnaire forms from 21 of 24 (87.5%) centers that responded were evaluated.

Results: The most frequent histology was non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (81%). The most common postoperative radiotherapy (RT) indications were close/(+) surgical margins (95%) and presence of pN2 disease (91%). The most common indications for postoperative chemotherapy (CHT) were ">/= IB" disease (19%) and the presence of pN2 disease (19%). In Stage IIIA potentially resectable NSCLC, the most frequent treatment approach was neoadjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) (57%). In Stage IIIA unresectable and Stage IIIB disease, the most frequent approach was definitive concomitant CHRT (91%). In limited SCLC, the most common treatment approach was concomitant CHRT with cisplatin+etoposide for cycles 1-3, completion of CHT to cycles 4-6, and finally prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with complete response (71%). Six cycles of cisplatin + etoposide CHT and palliative thoracic RT, when required, was the most commonly used treatment (81%) in extensive SCLC. Sixty-two percent of centers did not have endobronchial brachytherapy (EBB) facilities.

Conclusion: There is great variation in diagnostic testing, treatment strategies, indications for postoperative RT and CHT, RT features, and EBB availability for LC cases. To establish standards, national guidelines should be prepared using a multidisciplinary approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.03.035DOI Listing
December 2008

Clinicopathologic characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in central Anatolia, in Turkey.

Yonsei Med J 2006 Feb;47(1):22-33

Department of Hematology-Oncology, Erciyes University School of Medicine, 38039 Kayseri, Turkey.

Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is a common presentation of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The main controversy arises when many aspects of its classification and management are under discussion, particularly regarding roles for surgical resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinicopathologic characteristics and the therapeutic outcome of primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We carried out a retrospective analysis of 74 patients who were presented to our center with histopathological diagnosis of primary gastro-intestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma between 1990 and 2001. All patients have been staged according to Lugano Staging System. For histopathological classification, International Working Formulation was applied. The treatment choice concerning the surgical or non-surgical management was decided by the initially acting physician. Treatment modalities were compared using the parameters of age, sex, histopathological results, stage, and the site of disease. Of the 74 patients, 31 were female and 43 were male, with a median age of 49 years (range 15-80). The stomach was the most common primary site and was seen in 51 of 74 patients (68.9%). The intermediate and high grade lymphomas constituted 91.9% of the all cases. In a median follow-up of 29 months (range 2-128), 20 out of 74 patients died. There was a three year overall survival rate in 65.4% of all patients. The three year overall survival rate was better in stage I and II1 patients who were treated with surgery plus chemotherapy (+/-RT) than those treated with chemotherapy alone (93.7% vs. 55.6%, p < 0.05). The stage and presence of B symptoms affected the disease free survival and overall survival significantly, but the histopathologic grade only affected the overall survival. On the basis of these results, we suggest that surgical resection is necessary before chemotherapy in early stage (stage I and II1) patients with gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas because of the significant survival advantage it would bring to the patient.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2687578PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3349/ymj.2006.47.1.22DOI Listing
February 2006

Assessment of quality of life of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with EORTC QLQ-C30 and H&N-35 modules.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2005 Dec 19;63(5):1347-53. Epub 2005 Sep 19.

Turkish Oncology Group (TOG)--Head and Neck Cancer Working Party, Hacettepe University, Sihhiye, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: The current study reports on long-term quality of life (QoL) status after conventional radiotherapy in 187 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients from 14 centers in Turkey.

Patients And Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, who were treated in 14 centers in Turkey with minimum 6 months of follow-up and were in complete remission, were asked to complete Turkish versions of EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire and the HN-35 module. Each center participated with the required clinical data that included age at diagnosis, gender, symptoms on admission, follow-up period, treatment modalities, radiotherapy dose, and AJCC 1997 tumor stage. Each patient's 33 QoL scores, which included function, global health status, and symptoms, were calculated as instructed in EORTC QLQ-C30 scoring manual. All of the scales and single-item measures range from 0 to 100. A high score represents a higher response level. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U nonparametric tests were used for comparisons.

Results: One hundred eighty-seven patients with median age of 46 years (range, 16-79 years) participated and completed the questionnaires. Median follow-up time was 3.4 years (range, 6 months-24 years). All patients have received external-beam radiotherapy. Beside external-beam radiotherapy, 59 patients underwent brachytherapy boost, 70 patients received concomitant chemotherapy, and 95 patients received adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Most of the patients in the analysis (75%) were in advanced stage (Stage III, n = 85 [45.4%]; Stage IV, n = 55 [29%]). Mean global health status was calculated as 73. Parameters that increased global health status were male gender, early-stage disease, and less than 4-year follow-up (p < 0.05). Functional parameters were better in males and in early-stage disease. Factors that yielded better symptom scores were short interval after treatment (10 scores), male gender (7 scores), and lower radiation dose (6 scores). Neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy did not have any effect on QoL, whereas concomitant chemotherapy adversely affected 5 symptom scores.

Conclusion: Quality of life is adversely affected in our nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with combined therapies. The factors that adversely affect quality of life are advanced tumor stage, female gender, and long-term follow-up. Further controlled studies to evaluate both preradiotherapy and postradiotherapy status are necessary to clarify the contribution of each treatment modality to QoL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.05.057DOI Listing
December 2005

Ifosfamide, mesna, and interferon-alpha2A combination chemoimmunotherapy in malignant mesothelioma: results of a single center in central anatolia.

Med Oncol 2004 ;21(4):359-66

Medical Oncology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, Kayseri, Turkey.

Our aim was to determine the efficacy of ifosfamide, mesna, and interferon alpha combination therapy in malignant mesothelioma (MM) patients. Fourty-two patients (39 evaluable) with histologically proven MM were enrolled into this study from January 1999 to October 2002. The drug schedule consisted of a combination of ifosfamide, 3000 mg/m2 1-3 d intravenous infusion (iv), the uroprotective agent mesna, 3000 mg/m2 1-3 d iv every 3 wk, and interferon alpha2a, 4.5 MU subcutaneously (sc) 3 d/wk for 6 mo as first-line chemotherapy. Overall, 140 cycles were administered to the 39 patients (median, 3.5 cycles; range, 1 to 6 cycles). Among the 39 patients, 8 partial remissions (PR) (21%) were observed. Thirteen patients (33%) had stable disease for at least 8 wk and 18 (46%) had progressive disease. Overall survival (OAS) and progression free survival (PFS) for all patients were 10.0 +/- 2.9 mo (95%CI 4.3-15.7) and 5.0 +/- 1.9 mo (95%CI 1.38-8.62), respectively. One and two year survival rates were calculated as 39% and 5%, respectively. All of the PR patients had the epithelial type of MM. Their survival time was 21.0 +/- 5.7 mo (95% CI 9.9-32.1) and significantly longer than that of nonresponders (p=0.0061). The toxicity of the drug combination was mild and well tolerated. There were no treatment-related deaths. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were seen in 10 patients (26%) and 3 patients (8%), respectively. Chemotherapy was stopped in three patients because of renal function deficiency. One of these patients who had peritoneal MM required hemodialysis. In conclusion, this combination therapy showed encouraging antitumor activity with modest toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/MO:21:4:359DOI Listing
March 2005

Preliminary results of a phase II study of weekly paclitaxel (PTX) and carboplatin (CBDCA) administered concurrently with thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) followed by consolidation chemotherapy with PTX/CBDCA for stage III unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Am J Clin Oncol 2004 Dec;27(6):603-10

Department of Radiation Oncology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, Kayseri, Turkey.

Concurrent chemoradiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of unresectable NSCLC. This phase II study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of paclitaxel (PTX) and carboplatin (CBDCA) at a recommended dose, based on other previous phase I studies. Twenty-two unresectable stage III NSCLC patients participated in this trial. Of those 22 patients, 19 were evaluable, with a median age of 57 (with ages ranging between 42 and 74), in stages IIIA/IIIB: 6/13. Every patient displayed adequate organ functions. Treatment consisted of a 1-hour i.v. infusion of 50 mg/m2 of PTX followed by a half-hour infusion of CBDCA AUC 2 administered weekly concurrently with radiation treatment, every first day of those weeks in which the patient underwent radiotherapy. Concurrent thoracic radiation therapy was performed in daily doses of 2 Gy to a total dose of 66 Gy over a period of 6.5 weeks. After completion of chemoradiotherapy, consolidation chemotherapy was administered via a 3-hour i.v. infusion of 175 mg/2 PTX on days 1 and 22, in combination with a 1-hour i.v. infusion of CBDCA AUC 6 on days 1 and 22, q 4 weeks for 4 cycles. The overall response rate was 78.9% (95% CI: 62-87.7) with 5 CR (26.3%), 10 PR (52.6%), 2 SD (15.8%), and 1 PD (5.3%). The median survival rate of the patients was 13.9 months, and the 1-year survival rate was 65.1%. Toxicity was moderate: grade 2 neutropenia was seen in 8, and grade 3 neutropenia in 5 patients. Grade 2 thrombocytopenia was seen in 3 patients, and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was not observed. Nonhematologic toxicities were moderate: esophagitis was the most common, and significant toxicity was noted in this study (89.4%). Grade 1 asthenia/fatigue was observed in 5, and grade 2 asthenia/fatigue in 3 patients; furthermore, grade 1 peripheral neuropathy was seen in 4 of the cases and grade 2 peripheral neuropathy in 3 of the cases. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly PTX/CBDCA, followed by consolidation chemotherapy with the same regimen in patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC is feasible and well tolerated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.coc.0000135739.37072.ffDOI Listing
December 2004

Effects of amifostine on acute toxicity from concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer: report of a randomized comparative trial.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2004 Apr;58(5):1369-77

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Purpose: To determine the ability of amifostine to reduce the severity and/or incidence of the acute toxicities of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer.

Methods And Materials: Patients with inoperable, nonmetastatic non-small-cell lung cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy were randomized to one of two treatment groups. Arm 1 patients received thoracic RT (total dose, 69.6 Gy in 58 fractions of 1.2 Gy b.i.d. 5 d/wk), plus oral etoposide (50 mg b.i.d. 30 min before thoracic RT for 10 days, repeated on Day 29) and cisplatin (50 mg/m2 i.v. on Days 1, 8, 29, and 36). Arm 2 patients received the same treatment plus amifostine (500 mg i.v. 20-30 min before any treatment the first 2 days of each week). Acute effects were assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria.

Results: Sixty-two patients were enrolled between November 1998 and January 2001. The minimal follow-up was 24 months, and the median follow-up of living patients was 31 months. The patient and tumor characteristics were equally distributed between the patients in the two arms. The median survival time was 20 months in Arm 1 patients and 19 months in Arm 2 patients. The maximal esophageal toxicity was mild (Grade 1) in 23%, moderate (Grade 2) in 42%, and severe (Grade 3-4) in 35% of patients in Arm 1; the corresponding rates for the Arm 2 patients were 48%, 35%, and 16% (p = 0.021). Severe pneumonitis occurred in 16% of the Arm 1 and none of the Arm 2 patients (p = 0.020, chi-square test). Neutropenic fever occurred in 39% of Arm 1 and 16% of Arm 2 patients (p = 0.046, chi-square test). Mild hypotension, dysgeusia, and sneezing were significantly more frequent among the patients in Arm 2.

Conclusion: Amifostine reduced the severity and incidence of acute esophageal, pulmonary, and hematologic toxicity resulting from concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy and RT. Amifostine had no apparent effect on survival in these patients with unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer, suggesting that it does not have a tumor-protective effect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2003.10.005DOI Listing
April 2004

Outcomes and patterns of failure in bronchial carcinoid tumors.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2003 Jan;55(1):125-31

Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Purpose: To clarify the natural history, prognosis, and treatment failure patterns for bronchial carcinoid tumors according to their clinical and histopathologic features.

Methods: The charts of 241 patients from our institution with bronchial carcinoid tumors were reviewed. Thirty-four patients had no follow-up, yielding a study population of 206. Of the 206 patients, 62 had atypical carcinoid (AC) and 144 had typical carcinoid (TC) tumors.

Results: The 5-, 10-, and 20-year disease-specific survival rates were lower in patients with AC (60.1%, 36.8%, and 28.1%, respectively) than in those with TC (79.0%, 62.9%, and 38.8%, respectively; p = 0.0002). Predictors of poor outcome included more advanced stage (p <0.00001), male gender (p = 0.019), symptoms at presentation (p = 0.013), and age >or=60 years (p = 0.02). Stage I AC was associated with a median disease-free survival of 96 months compared with 222 months for Stage I TC (p = 0.0002) and had an actuarial 22% locoregional failure rate 5 years after surgery compared with 6% for Stage I TC (p = 0.022). The disease-free survival for Stage II and III AC was worse than that for Stage II or III TC, but the difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.15). Locoregional failure was also prominent in Stage II and III AC. Second malignancies were common in patients with bronchial carcinoids (56 of 206 patients).

Conclusion: Stage-for-stage, the outcome is worse for patients with AC than for those with TC. Locoregional failure is common after curative resection, even for early-stage AC. Second cancers are common in patients with carcinoid tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0360-3016(02)03796-3DOI Listing
January 2003