Publications by authors named "Bénédicte Neven"

185 Publications

Single-cell analysis of FOXP3 deficiencies in humans and mice unmasks intrinsic and extrinsic CD4 T cell perturbations.

Nat Immunol 2021 Apr 8. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

Department of Immunology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

FOXP3 deficiency in mice and in patients with immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked (IPEX) syndrome results in fatal autoimmunity by altering regulatory T (T) cells. CD4 T cells in patients with IPEX syndrome and Foxp3-deficient mice were analyzed by single-cell cytometry and RNA-sequencing, revealing heterogeneous T-like cells, some very similar to normal T cells, others more distant. Conventional T cells showed no widespread activation or helper T cell bias, but a monomorphic disease signature affected all CD4 T cells. This signature proved to be cell extrinsic since it was extinguished in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice and heterozygous mothers of patients with IPEX syndrome. Normal T cells exerted dominant suppression, quenching the disease signature and revealing in mutant T-like cells a small cluster of genes regulated cell-intrinsically by FOXP3, including key homeostatic regulators. We propose a two-step pathogenesis model: cell-intrinsic downregulation of core FOXP3-dependent genes destabilizes T cells, de-repressing systemic mediators that imprint the disease signature on all T cells, furthering T cell dysfunction. Accordingly, interleukin-2 treatment improved the T-like compartment and survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41590-021-00910-8DOI Listing
April 2021

Sustained remission after haploidentical bone marrow transplantation in a child with refractory systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Pediatr Rheumatol Online J 2021 Mar 12;19(1):27. Epub 2021 Mar 12.

Pediatric Hematology-Immunology and Rheumatology Department, Necker-Enfants-Malades University Hospital, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75015, Paris, France.

Background: Some patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) and severe, refractory disease achieved remission through intensive immunosuppressive treatment followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, disease relapsed in most cases. More recently selected SJIA patients received allogenic HSCT from a HLA-identical sibling or a HLA matched unrelated donor. While most transplanted patients achieved sustained SJIA remission off-treatment, the procedure-related morbidity was high.

Case Report: A girl presented SJIA with a severe disease course since the age of 15 months. She was refractory to the combination of methotrexate and steroids to anti-interleukin (IL)-1, then anti-IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors, and thalidomide. Given the high disease burden and important treatment-related toxicity the indication for a haploidentical HSCT from her mother was validated, as no HLA matched donor was available. The patient received a T replete bone marrow graft at the age of 3.7 years. Conditioning regimen contained Rituximab, Alemtuzumab, Busulfan, and Fludarabine. Cyclophosphamide at D + 3 and + 4 post HSCT was used for graft-versus-host-disease prophylaxis, followed by Cyclosporin A and Mycophenolate Mofetil. Post HSCT complications included severe infections, grade 3 intestinal graft-versus-host-disease, autoimmune thyroiditis, and immune thrombocytopenia. Three years after HSCT, the child is alive and well, notwithstanding persistent hypothyroidy requiring substitution. Immune thrombocytopenia had resolved. Most importantly, SJIA was in complete remission, off immunosuppressive drugs.

Conclusion: Allogenic HSCT may be a therapeutic option, even with a HLA haplo-identical alternative donor, in patients with inflammatory diseases such as SJIA. Despite increased experience with this treatment, the risk of life-threatening complications restrains its indication to selected patients with severe, refractory disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12969-021-00523-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7953742PMC
March 2021

Two Novel Homozygous Mutations in Phosphoglucomutase 3 Leading to Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, Skeletal Dysplasia, and Malformations.

J Clin Immunol 2021 Feb 3. Epub 2021 Feb 3.

INSERM UMR1163, Imagine Institute, Université de Paris, Paris, France.

Phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3) deficiency is a rare congenital disorder of glycosylation. Most of patients with autosomal recessive hypomorphic mutations in PGM3 encoding for phosphoglucomutase 3 present with eczema, skin and lung infections, elevated serum IgE, as well as neurological and skeletal features. A few PGM3-deficient patients suffer from a more severe disease with nearly absent T cells and severe skeletal dysplasia. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing on two kindred to identify the underlying genetic etiology of a severe combined immunodeficiency with developmental defect. We report here two novel homozygous missense variants (p.Gly359Asp and p.Met423Thr) in PGM3 identified in three patients from two unrelated kindreds with severe combined immunodeficiency, neurological impairment, and skeletal dysplasia. Both variants segregated with the disease in the two families. They were predicted to be deleterious by in silico analysis. PGM3 enzymatic activity was found to be severely impaired in primary fibroblasts and Epstein-Barr virus immortalized B cells from the kindred carrying the p.Met423Thr variant. Our findings support the pathogenicity of these two novel variants in severe PGM3 deficiency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-021-00985-wDOI Listing
February 2021

Expanding the Nude SCID/CID Phenotype Associated with FOXN1 Homozygous, Compound Heterozygous, or Heterozygous Mutations.

J Clin Immunol 2021 Jan 19. Epub 2021 Jan 19.

Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Pediatrics Section, Federico II University of Naples, via S. Pansini 5, 80131, Naples, Italy.

Human nude SCID is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of immunity (IEI) characterized by congenital athymia, alopecia, and nail dystrophy. Few cases have been reported to date. However, the recent introduction of newborn screening for IEIs and high-throughput sequencing has led to the identification of novel and atypical cases. Moreover, immunological alterations have been recently described in patients carrying heterozygous mutations. The aim of this paper is to describe the extended phenotype associated with FOXN1 homozygous, compound heterozygous, or heterozygous mutations. We collected clinical and laboratory information of a cohort of 11 homozygous, 2 compound heterozygous, and 5 heterozygous patients with recurrent severe infections. All, except one heterozygous patient, had signs of CID or SCID. Nail dystrophy and alopecia, that represent the hallmarks of the syndrome, were not always present, while almost 50% of the patients developed Omenn syndrome. One patient with hypomorphic compound heterozygous mutations had a late-onset atypical phenotype. A SCID-like phenotype was observed in 4 heterozygous patients coming from the same family. A spectrum of clinical manifestations may be associated with different mutations. The severity of the clinical phenotype likely depends on the amount of residual activity of the gene product, as previously observed for other SCID-related genes. The severity of the manifestations in this heterozygous family may suggest a mechanism of negative dominance of the specific mutation or the presence of additional mutations in noncoding regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-021-00967-yDOI Listing
January 2021

Long term follow-up of pediatric-onset Evans syndrome: broad immunopathological manifestations and high treatment burden.

Haematologica 2021 Jan 14. Epub 2021 Jan 14.

Centre de Référence National des Cytopénies Auto-immunes de l'Enfant (CEREVANCE), Bordeaux, France; Pediatric Oncology Hematology Unit, University Hospital, Plurithématique CIC (CICP), Centre d'Investigation Clinique (CIC) 1401, INSERM Bordeaux.

Pediatric-onset Evans syndrome (pES) is defined by both immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) before the age of 18 years. There have been no comprehensive long-term studies of this rare disease, which can be associated to various immunopathological manifestations (IMs). We report outcomes of the 151 patients with pES and more than 5 years of follow-up from the nationwide French prospective OBS'CEREVANCE cohort. Median age at final follow-up was 18.5 (6.8-50.0) years and the median follow-up period was 11.3 (5.1-38.0) years. At 10 years, ITP and AIHA were in sustained complete remission in 54.5% and 78.4% of patients, respectively. The frequency and number of clinical and biological IMs increased with age: at 20 years old, 74% had at least one clinical cIM. A wide range of cIMs occurred, mainly lymphoproliferation, dermatological, gastrointestinal/hepatic and pneumological IMs. The number of cIMs was associated with a subsequent increase in the number of second-line treatments received (other than steroids and immunoglobulins; hazard ratio, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-1.60; p = 0.0002, Cox proportional hazards method). Survival at 15 years after diagnosis was 84%. Death occurred at a median age of 18 (1.7-31.5) years, and the most frequent cause was infection. The number of second-line treatments and severe/recurrent infections were independently associated with mortality. In conclusion, longterm outcomes of pES showed remission of cytopenias but frequent IMs linked to high secondline treatment burden. Mortality was associated to drugs and/or underlying immunodeficiencies, and adolescents-young adults are a high-risk subgroup.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2020.271106DOI Listing
January 2021

Life-Saving, Dose-Adjusted, Targeted Therapy in a Patient with a STAT3 Gain-of-Function Mutation.

J Clin Immunol 2021 Jan 11. Epub 2021 Jan 11.

Pediatric Immunohematology and Rheumatology Department, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), 149 rue de Sèvres, F-75015, Paris, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-020-00914-3DOI Listing
January 2021

Differential Expression of Interferon-Alpha Protein Provides Clues to Tissue Specificity Across Type I Interferonopathies.

J Clin Immunol 2021 Apr 7;41(3):603-609. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Université de Paris, Imagine Institute, Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Neuroinflammation, 24 boulevard du Montparnasse, 75015, Paris, France.

Whilst upregulation of type I interferon (IFN) signaling is common across the type I interferonopathies (T1Is), central nervous system (CNS) involvement varies between these disorders, the basis of which remains unclear. We collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from patients with Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI), presumed monogenic T1Is (pT1I), childhood systemic lupus erythematosus with neuropsychiatric features (nSLE), non-IFN-related autoinflammation (AI) and non-inflammatory hydrocephalus (as controls). We measured IFN-alpha protein using digital ELISA. Eighty-two and 63 measurements were recorded respectively in CSF and serum of 42 patients and 6 controls. In an intergroup comparison (taking one sample per individual), median CSF IFN-alpha levels were elevated in AGS, SAVI, pT1I, and nSLE compared to AI and controls, with levels highest in AGS compared to all other groups. In AGS, CSF IFN-alpha concentrations were higher than in paired serum samples. In contrast, serum IFN was consistently higher compared to CSF levels in SAVI, pT1I, and nSLE. Whilst IFN-alpha is present in the CSF and serum of all IFN-related diseases studied here, our data suggest the primary sites of IFN production in the monogenic T1I AGS and SAVI are, respectively, the CNS and the periphery. These results inform the diagnosis of, and future therapeutic approaches to, monogenic and multifactorial T1Is.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-020-00952-xDOI Listing
April 2021

Somatic reversion of pathogenic DOCK8 variants alters lymphocyte differentiation and function to effectively cure DOCK8 deficiency.

J Clin Invest 2021 Feb;131(3)

Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Inborn errors of immunity cause monogenic immune dysregulatory conditions such as severe and recurrent pathogen infection, inflammation, allergy, and malignancy. Somatic reversion refers to the spontaneous repair of a pathogenic germline genetic variant and has been reported to occur in a number of inborn errors of immunity, with a range of impacts on clinical outcomes of these conditions. DOCK8 deficiency due to biallelic inactivating mutations in DOCK8 causes a combined immunodeficiency characterized by severe bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, as well as allergic disease and some cancers. Here, we describe the clinical, genetic, and cellular features of 3 patients with biallelic DOCK8 variants who, following somatic reversion in multiple lymphocyte subsets, exhibited improved clinical features, including complete resolution of infection and allergic disease, and cure over time. Acquisition of DOCK8 expression restored defective lymphocyte signalling, survival and proliferation, as well as CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity, CD4+ T cell cytokine production, and memory B cell generation compared with typical DOCK8-deficient patients. Our temporal analysis of DOCK8-revertant and DOCK8-deficient cells within the same individual established mechanisms of clinical improvement in these patients following somatic reversion and revealed further nonredundant functions of DOCK8 in human lymphocyte biology. Last, our findings have significant implications for future therapeutic options for the treatment of DOCK8 deficiency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI142434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7843233PMC
February 2021

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Hepatitis-associated Aplastic Anemia Following Liver Transplantation for Nonviral Hepatitis: A Retrospective Analysis and a Review of the Literature by the Severe Aplastic Anemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (SAAWP-EBMT).

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2020 Dec 2. Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Hopital St. Louis, Paris.

Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAAA) has been reported in 23% to 33% of patients who received orthotopic liver transplantation (LT) for acute liver disease of unknown origin (nonviral hepatitis). In this situation, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) might be a curative option. Here the authors report on 6 patients who received HSCT after LT for nonviral HAAA hepatitis. The outcomes were interpreted in the context of recently reported immune suppressive therapy (IST) outcomes in 8 patients with HAAA and to HSCT outcomes in patients with HAAA who recovered from hepatitis without undergoing LT. All patients transplanted by using HLA-identical sibling donors (3 out of 6) were alive and had normal liver function and hematopoiesis without graft versus host disease. Both patients receiving bone marrow from a matched unrelated donor (MUD) experienced extensive graft versus host disease that was fatal for one patient. Thereby, the authors conclude that HSCT can be considered as a first-choice treatment for this category of patients when HLA-identical donors are available. When no HLA-identical donor is available, IST should be applied as HSCT with other donor sources might be reserved for IST nonresponders or poor responders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPH.0000000000001991DOI Listing
December 2020

Different Clinical Presentations and Outcomes of Disseminated Varicella in Children With Primary and Acquired Immunodeficiencies.

Front Immunol 2020 5;11:595478. Epub 2020 Nov 5.

Service d'Immunologie et Hématologie Pédiatrique, Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Paris, France.

Primary infection with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox, a benign and self-limited disease in healthy children. In patients with primary or acquired immunodeficiencies, primary infection can be life-threatening, due to rapid dissemination of the virus to various organs [lung, gastrointestinal tract, liver, eye, central nervous system (CNS)]. We retrospectively described and compared the clinical presentations and outcomes of disseminated varicella infection (DV) in patients with acquired (AID) (= 7) and primary (PID) (= 12) immunodeficiencies. Patients with AID were on immunosuppression (mostly steroids) for nephrotic syndrome, solid organ transplantation or the treatment of hemopathies, whereas those with PID had combined immunodeficiency (CID) or severe CID (SCID). The course of the disease was severe and fulminant in patients with AID, with multiple organ failure, no rash or a delayed rash, whereas patients with CID and SICD presented typical signs of chickenpox, including a rash, with dissemination to other organs, including the lungs and CNS. In the PID group, antiviral treatment was prolonged until immune reconstitution after bone marrow transplantation, which was performed in 10/12 patients. Four patients died, and three experienced neurological sequelae. SCID patients had the worst outcome. Our findings highlight substantial differences in the clinical presentation and course of DV between children with AID and PID, suggesting differences in pathophysiology. Prevention, early diagnosis and treatment are required to improve outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.595478DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7674974PMC
November 2020

Overview of STING-Associated Vasculopathy with Onset in Infancy (SAVI) Among 21 Patients.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2021 Feb 18;9(2):803-818.e11. Epub 2020 Nov 18.

Pediatric Hematology-Immunology and Rheumatology Department, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP Centre Université de Paris, Paris, France; Université de Paris, Imagine Institute, Laboratory of Immunogenetics of Pediatric Autoimmunity, INSERM UMR 1163, Paris, France. Electronic address:

Background: Gain-of-function mutations in STING1 underlie a type I interferonopathy termed SAVI (STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy). This severe disease is variably characterized by early-onset systemic inflammation, skin vasculopathy, and interstitial lung disease (ILD).

Objective: To describe a cohort of patients with SAVI.

Methods: Assessment of clinical, radiological and immunological data from 21 patients (17 families) was carried out.

Results: Patients carried heterozygous substitutions in STING1 previously described in SAVI, mainly the p.V155M. Most were symptomatic from infancy, but late onset in adulthood occurred in 1 patient. Systemic inflammation, skin vasculopathy, and ILD were observed in 19, 18, and 21 patients, respectively. Extensive tissue loss occurred in 4 patients. Severity of ILD was highly variable with insidious progression up to end-stage respiratory failure reached at teenage in 6 patients. Lung imaging revealed early fibrotic lesions. Failure to thrive was almost constant, with severe growth failure seen in 4 patients. Seven patients presented polyarthritis, and the phenotype in 1 infant mimicked a combined immunodeficiency. Extended features reminiscent of other interferonopathies were also found, including intracranial calcification, glaucoma and glomerular nephropathy. Increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes and interferon α protein was constant. Autoantibodies were frequently found, in particular rheumatoid factor. Most patients presented with a T-cell defect, with low counts of memory CD8+ cells and impaired T-cell proliferation in response to antigens. Long-term follow-up described in 8 children confirmed the clinical benefit of ruxolitinib in SAVI where the treatment was started early in the disease course, underlying the need for early diagnosis. Tolerance was reasonably good.

Conclusion: The largest worldwide cohort of SAVI patients yet described, illustrates the core features of the disease and extends the clinical and immunological phenotype to include overlap with other monogenic interferonopathies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2020.11.007DOI Listing
February 2021

Vasculitis as a Major Morbidity Factor in Patients With Partial RAG Deficiency.

Front Immunol 2020 21;11:574738. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

University of South Florida at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital, Saint Petersburg, FL, United States.

Vasculitis can be a life-threatening complication associated with high mortality and morbidity among patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs), including variants of severe and combined immunodeficiencies ((S)CID). Our understanding of vasculitis in partial defects in recombination activating gene (RAG) deficiency, a prototype of (S)CIDs, is limited with no published systematic evaluation of diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. In this report, we sought to establish the clinical, laboratory features, and treatment outcome of patients with vasculitis due to partial RAG deficiency. Vasculitis was a major complication in eight (13%) of 62 patients in our cohort with partial RAG deficiency with features of infections and immune dysregulation. Vasculitis occurred early in life, often as first sign of disease (50%) and was complicated by significant end organ damage. Viral infections often preceded the onset of predominately non-granulomatous-small vessel vasculitis. Autoantibodies against cytokines (IFN-α, -ω, and IL-12) were detected in a large fraction of the cases tested (80%), whereas the majority of patients were anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) negative (>80%). Genetic diagnosis of RAG deficiency was delayed up to 2 years from the onset of vasculitis. Clinical cases with sole skin manifestation responded well to first-line steroid treatment, whereas systemic vasculitis with severe end-organ complications required second-line immunosuppression and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for definitive management. In conclusion, our data suggest that vasculitis in partial RAG deficiency is prevalent among patients with partial RAG deficiency and is associated with high morbidity. Therefore, partial RAG deficiency should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with early-onset systemic vasculitis. Diagnostic serology may be misleading with ANCA negative findings, and search for conventional autoantibodies should be extended to include those targeting cytokines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.574738DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7609967PMC
October 2020

Infections in Patients with Chronic Granulomatous Disease Treated with Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Blockers for Inflammatory Complications.

J Clin Immunol 2021 Jan 4;41(1):185-193. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Necker-Enfants Malades University Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France.

Purpose: Management of inflammatory complications of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is challenging. The aim of this study was to assess safety, with a focus on infections, and effectiveness of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) blockers in CGD patients.

Methods: A retrospective, single-center cohort study of CGD patients treated by anti-TNF-α agents at Necker-Enfants Malades University Hospital (Paris, France) and registered at the French National Reference Center for Primary Immunodeficiencies (CEREDIH).

Results: Between 2006 and 2019, 14 (X-linked: n = 10, 71.4%; autosomal-recessive: n = 4, 28.6%) CGD patients with gastrointestinal (n = 12, 85.7%), pulmonary (n = 10, 71.4%), cutaneous (n = 3, 21.4%), and/or genitourinary (n = 2, 14.3%) inflammatory manifestations received one or more doses of infliximab because of steroid-dependent (n = 7, 50%), refractory (n = 4, 28.6%) inflammatory disease or as first-line drug (n = 2, 14.3%; missing data, n = 1). All patients received adequate antimicrobial prophylaxis. Infliximab achieved complete (n = 2, 14.3%) or partial (n = 9, 64.3%) response in 11 (78.6%) patients. Seven (50%) patients were switched to adalimumab. During anti-TNF-α treatment, 11 infections (pneumonia, adenitis, invasive candidiasis, each n = 2; intra-abdominal abscess, bacteremic salmonellosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa-related folliculitis, cat-scratch disease, proven pulmonary mucormycosis, each n = 1) occurred in 7 (50%) patients. All infectious complications had a favorable outcome. Anti-TNF-α treatment was definitively stopped because of infection in two patients. Nine (64.3%) patients finally underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. No death occurred during follow-up.

Conclusions: Anti-TNF-α treatment could improve the outcome of severe inflammatory complications in CGD patients, but increases their risk of infections. We suggest that anti-TNF-α treatment might be of short-term benefit in selected CGD patients with severe inflammatory complications awaiting hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-020-00901-8DOI Listing
January 2021

Early-onset autoimmunity associated with SOCS1 haploinsufficiency.

Nat Commun 2020 10 21;11(1):5341. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Université de Paris, Imagine institute, laboratory of Immunogenetics of Pediatric Autoimmune Diseases, INSERM UMR 1163, 24 boulevard du Montparnasse, 75015, Paris, France.

Autoimmunity can occur when a checkpoint of self-tolerance fails. The study of familial autoimmune diseases can reveal pathophysiological mechanisms involved in more common autoimmune diseases. Here, by whole-exome/genome sequencing we identify heterozygous, autosomal-dominant, germline loss-of-function mutations in the SOCS1 gene in ten patients from five unrelated families with early onset autoimmune manifestations. The intracellular protein SOCS1 is known to downregulate cytokine signaling by inhibiting the JAK-STAT pathway. Accordingly, patient-derived lymphocytes exhibit increased STAT activation in vitro in response to interferon-γ, IL-2 and IL-4 that is reverted by the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. This effect is associated with a series of in vitro and in vivo immune abnormalities consistent with lymphocyte hyperactivity. Hence, SOCS1 haploinsufficiency causes a dominantly inherited predisposition to early onset autoimmune diseases related to cytokine hypersensitivity of immune cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-18925-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7578789PMC
October 2020

Coronavirus disease 2019 in patients with inborn errors of immunity: An international study.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2021 Feb 24;147(2):520-531. Epub 2020 Sep 24.

Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, UNSW Sydney, Darlinghurst, Australia. Electronic address:

Background: There is uncertainty about the impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in individuals with rare inborn errors of immunity (IEI), a population at risk of developing severe coronavirus disease 2019. This is relevant not only for these patients but also for the general population, because studies of IEIs can unveil key requirements for host defense.

Objective: We sought to describe the presentation, manifestations, and outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection in IEI to inform physicians and enhance understanding of host defense against SARS-CoV-2.

Methods: An invitation to participate in a retrospective study was distributed globally to scientific, medical, and patient societies involved in the care and advocacy for patients with IEI.

Results: We gathered information on 94 patients with IEI with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Their median age was 25 to 34 years. Fifty-three patients (56%) suffered from primary antibody deficiency, 9 (9.6%) had immune dysregulation syndrome, 6 (6.4%) a phagocyte defect, 7 (7.4%) an autoinflammatory disorder, 14 (15%) a combined immunodeficiency, 3 (3%) an innate immune defect, and 2 (2%) bone marrow failure. Ten were asymptomatic, 25 were treated as outpatients, 28 required admission without intensive care or ventilation, 13 required noninvasive ventilation or oxygen administration, 18 were admitted to intensive care units, 12 required invasive ventilation, and 3 required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Nine patients (7 adults and 2 children) died.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that (1) more than 30% of patients with IEI had mild coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and (2) risk factors predisposing to severe disease/mortality in the general population also seemed to affect patients with IEI, including more younger patients. Further studies will identify pathways that are associated with increased risk of severe disease and are nonredundant or redundant for protection against SARS-CoV-2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2020.09.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7832563PMC
February 2021

Nocardiosis Associated with Primary Immunodeficiencies (Nocar-DIP): an International Retrospective Study and Literature Review.

J Clin Immunol 2020 11 12;40(8):1144-1155. Epub 2020 Sep 12.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Centre d'Infectiologie Necker -Pasteur, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Necker-Enfants Malades University Hospital, Université de Paris, Paris, France.

Purpose: Nocardiosis is a life-threatening infectious disease. We aimed at describing nocardiosis in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID).

Methods: This international retrospective cohort included patients with PID and nocardiosis diagnosed and/or published from Jan 1, 2000, to Dec 31, 2016. To identify nocardiosis cases, we analyzed PID databases from the French National Reference Center for PID (Paris, France) and the National Institute of Health (NIH, United States of America) and we performed a literature review on PubMed.

Results: Forty-nine cases of nocardiosis associated with PID were included: median age at diagnosis of nocardiosis was 19 (0-56) years and most cases were observed among chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients (87.8%). Median time from symptoms to diagnosis of Nocardia infection was 20 (2-257) days. Most frequent clinical nocardiosis presentation was pneumonia (86.7%). Twelve-month mortality rate was 4.2%, and 11.9% of patients experienced a possible recurrence of infection. Nocardiosis more frequently led to the diagnosis of PID among non-CGD patients than in CGD patients. Non-CGD patients experienced more cerebral nocardiosis and more disseminated infections, but mortality and recurrence rates were similar. Highest incidences of nocardiosis among PID cohorts were observed among CGD patients (0.0057 and 0.0044 cases/patient-year in the USA and in France, respectively), followed by IL-12p40 deficiency.

Conclusions: Among 49 cases of nocardiosis associated with PID, most patients had CGD and lung involvement. Both mortality and recurrence rates were low.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-020-00866-8DOI Listing
November 2020

Rapid identification and characterization of infected cells in blood during chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

J Exp Med 2020 11;217(11)

Laboratory of Lymphocyte Activation and Susceptibility to EBV Infection, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale UMR 1163, Imagine Institute, Paris, France.

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) preferentially infects epithelial cells and B lymphocytes and sometimes T and NK lymphocytes. Persistence of EBV-infected cells results in severe lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). Diagnosis of EBV-driven T or NK cell LPD and chronic active EBV diseases (CAEBV) is difficult, often requiring biopsies. Herein, we report a flow-FISH cytometry assay that detects cells expressing EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs), allowing rapid identification of EBV-infected cells among PBMCs. EBV-infected B, T, and/or NK cells were detectable in various LPD conditions. Diagnosis of CAEBV in 22 patients of Caucasian and African origins was established. All exhibited circulating EBV-infected T and/or NK cells, highlighting that CAEBV is not restricted to native American and Asian populations. Proportions of EBV-infected cells correlated with blood EBV loads. We showed that EBV-infected T cells had an effector memory activated phenotype, whereas EBV-infected B cells expressed plasma cell differentiation markers. Thus, this method achieves accurate and unambiguous diagnoses of different forms of EBV-driven LPD and represents a powerful tool to study their pathophysiological mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.20192262DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7596820PMC
November 2020

Mutations in COPA lead to abnormal trafficking of STING to the Golgi and interferon signaling.

J Exp Med 2020 11;217(11)

Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Neuroinflammation, Imagine Institute, Paris, France.

Heterozygous missense mutations in coatomer protein subunit α, COPA, cause a syndrome overlapping clinically with type I IFN-mediated disease due to gain-of-function in STING, a key adaptor of IFN signaling. Recently, increased levels of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) were described in COPA syndrome. However, the link between COPA mutations and IFN signaling is unknown. We observed elevated levels of ISGs and IFN-α in blood of symptomatic COPA patients. In vitro, both overexpression of mutant COPA and silencing of COPA induced STING-dependent IFN signaling. We detected an interaction between COPA and STING, and mutant COPA was associated with an accumulation of ER-resident STING at the Golgi. Given the known role of the coatomer protein complex I, we speculate that loss of COPA function leads to enhanced type I IFN signaling due to a failure of Golgi-to-ER STING retrieval. These data highlight the importance of the ER-Golgi axis in the control of autoinflammation and inform therapeutic strategies in COPA syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.20200600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7596811PMC
November 2020

β-Glucan-induced reprogramming of human macrophages inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation in cryopyrinopathies.

J Clin Invest 2020 09;130(9):4561-4573

Immunology of Fungal Infections, Department of Mycology, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

Exposure of mononuclear phagocytes to β-glucan, a naturally occurring polysaccharide, contributes to the induction of innate immune memory, which is associated with long-term epigenetic, metabolic, and functional reprogramming. Although previous studies have shown that innate immune memory induced by β-glucan confers protection against secondary infections, its impact on autoinflammatory diseases, associated with inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion, remains poorly understood. In particular, whether β-glucan-induced long-term reprogramming affects inflammasome activation in human macrophages in the context of these diseases has not been explored. We found that NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1β production were reduced in β-glucan-reprogrammed macrophages. β-Glucan acted upstream of the NLRP3 inflammasome by preventing potassium (K+) efflux, mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) generation, and, ultimately, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) oligomerization and speck formation. Importantly, β-glucan-induced memory in macrophages resulted in a remarkable attenuation of IL-1β secretion and caspase-1 activation in patients with an NLRP3-associated autoinflammatory disease, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Our findings demonstrate that β-glucan-induced innate immune memory represses IL-1β-mediated inflammation and support its potential clinical use in NLRP3-driven diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI134778DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7456248PMC
September 2020

New dosing nomogram and population pharmacokinetic model for young and very young children receiving busulfan for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation conditioning.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2020 10 24;67(10):e28603. Epub 2020 Jul 24.

Département de Biologie et Pathologie Médicale, Service de Pharmacologie, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.

Background: Busulfan (Bu) is the cornerstone of conditioning regimens prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, widely used in both adults and children for the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Despite an intravenous formulation, interindividual variability (IIV) remains high and optimal exposure difficult to achieve, especially in neonates and infants.

Procedure: To ensure both efficacy and safety, we set up in 2005 an observational study designed for children not fully assessed during the drug registration procedure. From a large cohort of 540 patients, we developed a Bu population pharmacokinetic model based on body weight (BW) and maturation concepts to reduce IIV and optimize exposure. A new dosing nomogram was evaluated to better fit the population pharmacokinetic model.

Results: Bu clearance IIV was significantly decreased from 61.3% (covariate-free model) to 28.6% when combining BW and maturation function. Median Bu area under the curve (AUC) was 1179 µmol/L × min compared to 1025 with the EMA dosing nomogram for children <9 kg. The target AUC was reached for each BW strata, significantly increasing the percentages of patients achieving reaching the targeted AUC as compared to FDA schedule.

Conclusion: This new model made it possible to propose a novel dosing nomogram that better considered children below 16 kg of BW and allowed better initial exposure as compared to existing dosing schedules. This nomogram, which would be easy to use to determine an optimal dosing schedule in daily practice, will need to be validated in clinical routine. Therapeutic drug monitoring remains strongly advisable for small children and those with specific diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.28603DOI Listing
October 2020

Hematopoietic cell transplantation in chronic granulomatous disease: a study of 712 children and adults.

Blood 2020 09;136(10):1201-1211

Department of Paediatric Immunology, Great North Children's Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency resulting in life-threatening infections and inflammatory complications. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) can cure the disease, but the indication to transplant remains controversial. We performed a retrospective multicenter study of 712 patients with CGD who underwent allo-HCT transplantation from March 1993 through December 2018. We studied 635 children (aged <18 years) and 77 adults. Median follow-up was 45 months. Median age at transplantation was 7 years (range, 0.1-48.6). Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) at 3 years were 85.7% and 75.8%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, older age was associated with reduced survival and increased chronic graft-versus-host disease. Nevertheless, OS and EFS at 3 years for patients ≥18 years were 76% and 69%, respectively. Use of 1-antigen-mismatched donors was associated with reduced OS and EFS . No significant difference was found in OS, but a significantly reduced EFS was noted in the small group of patients who received a transplant from a donor with a >1 antigen mismatch. Choice of conditioning regimen did not influence OS or EFS. In summary, we report an excellent outcome after allo-HCT in CGD, with low incidence of graft failure and mortality in all ages. Older patients and recipients of 1-antigen-mismatched grafts had a less favorable outcome. Transplantation should be strongly considered at a younger age and particularly in the presence of a well-matched donor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2020005590DOI Listing
September 2020

Ruxolitinib in children with steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease: A retrospective multicenter study of the pediatric group of SFGM-TC.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2020 09 2;67(9):e28233. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital of Rennes, Rennes, France.

Background: We conducted a national multicenter retrospective study in France to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of ruxolitinib in children with steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

Procedure: Patients were recruited from the 15 pediatric transplantation centers. Transplanted patients were eligible if they met the following criteria: aged ≤ 18 years at transplantation, receiving a myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, having an aGVHD of grade ≥2, and treated with ruxolitinib for steroid-refractory aGVHD.

Results: Twenty-nine patients received ruxolitinib for steroid-refractory aGVHD. Six patients achieved a complete response at day 28 after the start of treatment but finally 19 patients (65.5%) achieved a complete response (CR) with a median delay of 41 days (5-93 days). Two patients had a partial response. All patients who achieved CR or partial response discontinued corticosteroid treatment. Eight patients showed treatment failure. The overall response rate was 72.4%. Twenty-three of 29 patients were alive at a median follow-up of 685 days (177-1042 days) after the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Viral replication was observed in 41.4% of cases. We did not observe severe hematological adverse events and cytopenia requiring a modification of ruxolitinib doses always resolved. The median initial dose of ruxolitinib was 12.6 mg/m /day with an important range. We could not demonstrate any relationship between initial dose and effectiveness.

Conclusion: Ruxolitinib may constitute a promising second-line treatment for children with steroid-refractory aGVHD that should be validated in a prospective large-scale pharmacokinetic and efficacy trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.28233DOI Listing
September 2020

Extended clinical and immunological phenotype and transplant outcome in CD27 and CD70 deficiency.

Blood 2020 12;136(23):2638-2655

Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Rare and Undiagnosed Diseases, Vienna, Austria.

Biallelic mutations in the genes encoding CD27 or its ligand CD70 underlie inborn errors of immunity (IEIs) characterized predominantly by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated immune dysregulation, such as chronic viremia, severe infectious mononucleosis, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), lymphoproliferation, and malignancy. A comprehensive understanding of the natural history, immune characteristics, and transplant outcomes has remained elusive. Here, in a multi-institutional global collaboration, we collected the clinical information of 49 patients from 29 families (CD27, n = 33; CD70, n = 16), including 24 previously unreported individuals and identified a total of 16 distinct mutations in CD27, and 8 in CD70, respectively. The majority of patients (90%) were EBV+ at diagnosis, but only ∼30% presented with infectious mononucleosis. Lymphoproliferation and lymphoma were the main clinical manifestations (70% and 43%, respectively), and 9 of the CD27-deficient patients developed HLH. Twenty-one patients (43%) developed autoinflammatory features including uveitis, arthritis, and periodic fever. Detailed immunological characterization revealed aberrant generation of memory B and T cells, including a paucity of EBV-specific T cells, and impaired effector function of CD8+ T cells, thereby providing mechanistic insight into cellular defects underpinning the clinical features of disrupted CD27/CD70 signaling. Nineteen patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) prior to adulthood predominantly because of lymphoma, with 95% survival without disease recurrence. Our data highlight the marked predisposition to lymphoma of both CD27- and CD70-deficient patients. The excellent outcome after HSCT supports the timely implementation of this treatment modality particularly in patients presenting with malignant transformation to lymphoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2020006738DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7735164PMC
December 2020

Chronic Granulomatous Disease with the McLeod Phenotype: a French National Retrospective Case Series.

J Clin Immunol 2020 07 19;40(5):752-762. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Pediatric Immuno-Hematology and Rheumatology Unit, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Necker-Enfants Malades University Hospital, Paris, France.

Background: X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the CYBB gene (located on Xp21.1). Patients with large deletions on chromosome Xp21.1 can present with the McLeod phenotype and also Duchenne muscular dystrophy or retinitis pigmentosa. The objective of the present study was to describe a series of French patients with CGD and the McLeod phenotype.

Methods: We retrospectively collected data from the medical records of 8 patients with CGD and the McLeod phenotype registered at the French National Reference Center for blood types.

Results: The median age at diagnosis of CGD was 1.2 years, the median age at diagnosis of the McLeod phenotype was 4.5 years, and the median length of follow-up was 15.2 years. Four patients displayed allo-immunization, with anti-KEL20 and anti-XK1 (formerly known as anti-KL) antibodies. Five of the 6 patients with available blood smears had acanthocytosis. Neuropsychiatric, muscle-related, and ocular manifestations were present in 4, 2, and 1 of the patients, respectively. Three of the 4 patients having undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are alive. Overall, 5 patients are alive, and 3 are alive and well.

Conclusion: This is the largest yet descriptive study of a series of patients with X-linked CGD and the McLeod phenotype. Although this disease combination is rare, the timely, accurate diagnosis of the McLeod phenotype is critical because of the serious post-transfusion complications. However, HSCT can be considered in these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-020-00791-wDOI Listing
July 2020

STING Gain-of-Function Disrupts Lymph Node Organogenesis and Innate Lymphoid Cell Development in Mice.

Cell Rep 2020 06;31(11):107771

Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address:

STING gain-of-function causes autoimmunity and immunodeficiency in mice and STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI) in humans. Here, we report that STING gain-of-function in mice prevents development of lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. We show that the absence of secondary lymphoid organs is associated with diminished numbers of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), including lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. Although wild-type (WT) α4β7 progenitors differentiate efficiently into LTi cells, STING gain-of-function progenitors do not. Furthermore, STING gain-of-function impairs development of all types of ILCs. Patients with STING gain-of-function mutations have fewer ILCs, although they still have lymph nodes. In mice, expression of the STING mutant in RORγT-positive lineages prevents development of lymph nodes and reduces numbers of LTi cells. RORγT lineage-specific expression of STING gain-of-function also causes lung disease. Since RORγT is expressed exclusively in LTi cells during fetal development, our findings suggest that STING gain-of-function prevents lymph node organogenesis by reducing LTi cell numbers in mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2020.107771DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7372600PMC
June 2020

Improving the diagnostic efficiency of primary immunodeficiencies with targeted next-generation sequencing.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2021 Feb 10;147(2):734-737. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

University of Paris, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) Unité Mixte de Recherche (UMR) 1163, Imagine Institute, Paris, France; Study Center for Primary Immunodeficiencies, Necker Hospital for Sick Children-Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris, France; Laboratory of Lymphocyte Activation and Susceptibility to EBV infection, INSERM-UMR 1163, Paris, France; Pediatric Immuno-Hematology and Rheumatology Unit, Necker Hospital for Sick Children, AP-HP, Paris, France; French National Reference Center for Primary Immune Deficiencies, Le Centre de Référence Déficits Immunitaires Héréditaires, Necker Hospital for Sick Children, AP-HP, Paris, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2020.05.046DOI Listing
February 2021

Cutaneous barrier leakage and gut inflammation drive skin disease in Omenn syndrome.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2020 11 18;146(5):1165-1179.e11. Epub 2020 Apr 18.

Milan Unit, Institute for Genetic and Biomedical Research (IRGB) National Research Council (CNR), Milan, Italy; Humanitas Clinical and Research Center IRCCS, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. Electronic address:

Background: Severe early-onset erythroderma and gut inflammation, with massive tissue infiltration of oligoclonal activated T cells are the hallmark of Omenn syndrome (OS).

Objective: The impact of altered gut homeostasis in the cutaneous manifestations of OS remains to be clarified.

Methods: We analyzed a cohort of 15 patients with OS and the 129Sv/C57BL/6 knock-in Rag2 (Rag2) mouse model. Homing phenotypes of circulating lymphocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were examined in the sera by ELISA and in skin biopsies by immunohistochemistry and in situ RNA hybridization. Experimental colitis was induced in mice by dextran sulfate sodium salt.

Results: We show that memory/activated T cells from patients with OS and from the Rag2 mouse model of OS abundantly express the skin homing receptors cutaneous lymphocyte associated antigen and CCR4 (Ccr4), associated with high levels of chemokine C-C motif ligands 17 and 22. Serum levels of LPS are also elevated. A broad T1/T2/T17 inflammatory signature is detected in the periphery and in the skin. Increased Tlr4 expression in the skin of Rag2 mice is associated with enhanced cutaneous inflammation on local and systemic administration of LPS. Likewise, boosting colitis in Rag2 mice results in increased frequency of Ccr4 splenic T cells and worsening of skin inflammation, as indicated by epidermal thickening, enhanced epithelial cell activation, and dermal infiltration by T1 effector T cells.

Conclusions: These results support the existence of an interplay between gut and skin that can sustain skin inflammation in OS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2020.04.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7649331PMC
November 2020