Publications by authors named "Azita Dilmaghani"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A novel method for the development of plasmid DNA-loaded nanoliposomes for cancer gene therapy.

Drug Deliv Transl Res 2021 Jul 28. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Drug Applied Research Center & Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

We aimed to develop a simple yet novel method to prepare plasmid DNA-loaded nanoliposomes for cancer gene therapy. Murine interleukin-12 (mIL-12) pDNA-loaded nanoliposomes were prepared via novel freeze-drying of a monophase solution method. The physicochemical characteristics, cytotoxicity, and transfection efficiency of the prepared nanoliposomes in murine CT-26 colon carcinoma cells were evaluated. Furthermore, tumor progression and survival rate in CT-26 colon carcinoma-bearing BALB/c mice subsequent to direct intratumoral injections were investigated over a period of 40 days. Using this preparation method, nanoliposomes with particle size of around 300 nm and zeta potential of 96.5 mV were obtained. The transmission electron microscope results showed that the liposomes were nano-sized and almost spherical. The agarose gel retardation assay revealed the pDNA encapsulation in the nanoliposomes. The nanoliposomes with 72.4% encapsulation efficiency and low cell toxicity could significantly improve mIL-12 expression by approximately 25-fold relative to the naked mIL-12 pDNA. There was a significant tumor growth inhibition after repeated injections of mIL-12 pDNA-loaded nanoliposomes. This is the first study on the freeze-drying of a monophase solution method as a simple yet novel technique for the preparation of pDNA-loaded nanoliposomes. Given the ease of preparation method and promising in vitro and in vivo characteristics, this investigation demonstrates advances in pDNA lipid formulation for cancer gene therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13346-021-01034-0DOI Listing
July 2021

Synthesis and application of [email protected] double hydroxide as an anti-inflammatory drugs nanocarrier.

J Nanobiotechnology 2020 Oct 29;18(1):155. Epub 2020 Oct 29.

Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Background: Magnetic nanocomposites with a core-shell nanostructure have huge applications in different sciences especially in the release of the drugs, because of their exclusive physical and chemical properties. In this research, [email protected] double hydroxide [email protected] nanostructure was synthesized by the facile experiment and is used as novel drug nanocarrier.

Methods: Magnetic nanospheres were synthesized by a facile one-step solvothermal route, and then, layered double hydroxide nanoflakes were prepared on the magnetic nanospheres by coprecipitation experiment. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by FTIR, XRD, SEM, VSM, and TEM, respectively. After intercalation with Ibuprofen and Diclofenac as anti-inflammatory drugs and using exchange anion experiment, the basal spacing of synthesized layered double hydroxides was compared with brucite nanosheets from 0.48 nm to 2.62 nm and 2.22 nm, respectively.

Results: The results indicated that Ibuprofen and Diclofenac were successfully intercalated into the interlay space of LDHs via bridging bidentate interaction. In addition, in-vitro drug release experiments in pH 7.4, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed constant release profiles with Ibuprofen and Diclofenac as model drugs with different lipophilicity, water solubility, size, and steric effect.

Conclusion: The [email protected] and [email protected] had the advantage of the strong interaction between the carboxyl groups with higher trivalent cations by bridging bidentate, clarity, and high thermal stability. It is confirmed that [email protected] multicore-shell nanostructure may have potential application for constant drug delivery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12951-020-00718-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7596963PMC
October 2020

Microbial Alpha-Amylase Production: Progress, Challenges and Perspectives.

Adv Pharm Bull 2020 Jul 11;10(3):350-358. Epub 2020 May 11.

Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Alpha-amylase reputes for starch modification by breaking of 1-4 glycosidic bands and is widely applied in different industrial sectors. Microorganisms express unique alpha-amylases with thermostable and halotolerant characteristics dependent on the microorganism's intrinsic features. Likewise, genetic engineering methods are applied to produce enzymes with higher stability in contrast to wild types. As there are widespread application of α-amylase in industry, optimization methods like RSM are used to improve the production of the enzyme ex vivo. This study aimed to review the latest researches on the production improvement and stability of α-amylase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.34172/apb.2020.043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7335993PMC
July 2020

In Silico Study and Optimization of Bacillus megaterium alpha-Amylases Production Obtained from Honey Sources.

Curr Microbiol 2020 Oct 18;77(10):2593-2601. Epub 2020 May 18.

Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

This study aimed to screen alpha-amylase producing microorganisms from honey as a low water activity medium, a suitable source for selecting stable and cost-beneficial bacterial enzyme production systems. Plackett-Burman method was used to select twelve effective factors including pH, inoculum size, temperature, time, corn starch, KHPO, peptone, MgSO, CaCl, NaCl, glycerin, and yeast extract concentrations on bacterial alpha-amylases production yield. The Box-Behnken method was utilized to optimize the level of selected significant factors. The stability of bacterial alpha-amylases was also determined in low pH and high-temperature conditions. In addition, in silico study was used to create the alpha-amylase structure and study the stability in high-temperature and low water available condition. Among all isolated and characterized microorganisms, Bacillus megaterium produced the highest amount of alpha-amylases. The in silico data showed the enzyme 3D structure similarity to alpha-amylase from Halothermothrix orenii and highly negative charge amino acids on its surface caused the enzyme activity and stability in low water conditions. Based on Box-Behnken results, the temperature 35 °C, pH 6 and starch 40 g/l were determined as the optimum level of significant factors to achieve the highest alpha-amylases unit (101.44 U/ml). This bacterial alpha-amylases enzyme showed stability at pH 5 and a range of temperatures from 40 to 60 °C that indicates this enzyme may possess the potential for using in industrial processes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00284-020-02019-xDOI Listing
October 2020

The oncogenic roles of bacterial infections in development of cancer.

Microb Pathog 2020 Apr 30;141:104019. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Molecular Medicine Research Center, Biomedicine Institute, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address:

Initiation of cancer is interconnected with different factors like infections. It has been estimated that infections, particularly viruses, participate in about 20% of all cancers. Bacteria as the most common infectious agents are also reported to be emerging players in the establishment of malignant cells. Microbial infections are able to modulate host cell transformation for promoting malignant features through the production of carcinogenic metabolites participating in inflammation responses, disruption of cell metabolism, and integrity and also genomic or epigenetic manipulations. It seems that the best example of the role of bacteria in cancer promotion is Helicobacter pylori infection, which is related to gastric cancer. World Health Organization (WHO) describes bacterium as class I carcinogens. Several bacterial infections have been reported in association with prevalent cancers. In this review, we will summarize the role of known bacterial infections in the initiation of the main common cancers, which show high mortality in the world. Examining the microbiomes in cancer patients is important and necessary to better understand the pathogenesis of this disease and also to plan therapeutic interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2020.104019DOI Listing
April 2020

Investigation of pectin/starch hydrogel as a carrier for oral delivery of probiotic bacteria.

Int J Biol Macromol 2017 Apr 17;97:536-543. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Polymer Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Maragheh, Maragheh, Iran.

The present study highlights the fabrication of novel food-grade hydrogel particles based on pectin and starch for probiotic colon delivery. Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC:13643 (L. plantarum) cells were encapsulated in pectin/starch hydrogels by extrusion method. Four batches were formulated with different ratios of starch/pectin solutions. Optical and scanning electron microscopy obviously showed the random distribution of L. plantarum throughout the hydrogel network. The viability of encapsulated cells in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and bile salt solution was significantly higher when compared to nonencapsulated cells. Results demonstrated that encapsulated cells in pectin/starch hydrogels were resistant against adverse conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract and bile salt solution compared to non-encapsulated cells. After sequential exposure to simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) for 2h almost complete death of free cells was observed however the numbers of surviving cells were 5.15 and 6.67 Log CFU/g for pectin and pectin/starch hydrogel, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2017.01.060DOI Listing
April 2017

Effector diversification within compartments of the Leptosphaeria maculans genome affected by Repeat-Induced Point mutations.

Nat Commun 2011 Feb 15;2:202. Epub 2011 Feb 15.

INRA-Bioger, UR1290, Avenue Lucien Brétignières, BP 01, Thiverval-Grignon F-78850, France.

Fungi are of primary ecological, biotechnological and economic importance. Many fundamental biological processes that are shared by animals and fungi are studied in fungi due to their experimental tractability. Many fungi are pathogens or mutualists and are model systems to analyse effector genes and their mechanisms of diversification. In this study, we report the genome sequence of the phytopathogenic ascomycete Leptosphaeria maculans and characterize its repertoire of protein effectors. The L. maculans genome has an unusual bipartite structure with alternating distinct guanine and cytosine-equilibrated and adenine and thymine (AT)-rich blocks of homogenous nucleotide composition. The AT-rich blocks comprise one-third of the genome and contain effector genes and families of transposable elements, both of which are affected by repeat-induced point mutation, a fungal-specific genome defence mechanism. This genomic environment for effectors promotes rapid sequence diversification and underpins the evolutionary potential of the fungus to adapt rapidly to novel host-derived constraints.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1189DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3105345PMC
February 2011
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