Publications by authors named "Ayse C Tutuncu"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Propofol-based balanced anesthesia is safer in pediatric radiotherapy.

J Oncol Pharm Pract 2019 Dec 30;25(8):1891-1896. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Department of Anesthesiology, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Backround And Purpose: To investigate the incidence of complications related to propofol-based anesthesia and the factors associated with complications in children with radiotherapy.

Materials And Methods: Patients who underwent anesthesia for external beam radiotherapy between May 2013 and November 2017 were included in the study. We assessed the age/weight, sex, oncologic diagnosis, type of radiotherapy procedure, duration of anesthesia, applied agents, and complications related to anesthesia. Complications were evaluated between group I (only propofol group) and group II (propofol plus adjuvant drugs) as respiratory and cardiac.

Results: In 130 patients, sedation was given for 1376 radiotherapy procedures. Of these, 1274 (1140 radiation treatment sessions and 134 computed tomography simulations) in 126 patients were propofol-based and were included in the analysis. Although respiratory complications are the most common in both groups, there were no episodes of laryngospasm, broncospasm, and no use of advanced airway intervention. The rate of complication was significantly higher in only propofol anesthesia group than in patients treated with propofol plus adjuvant drugs. In the multivariate analysis, we found three factors that were significantly associated with the risk of complications: total dose of propofol (mg/kg) (p < 0.001), anesthesia with propofol alone (as compared to propofol plus adjunct agents) (p = 0.001), and diagnosis of neuroblastoma (as compared to other diagnosis) (p = 0.043).

Conclusion: Propofol-based anesthesia is preferred in order to minimize the rate of complications in radiotherapy anesthesia applications. The use of non-opioid adjuvants in combination with propofol to achieve a balanced anesthesia will also reduce the complications that may be encountered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1078155218825296DOI Listing
December 2019

Complications during esophageal endoscopy with or without baloon dilation under general anesthesia in pediatric patients: a prospective and observational study.

Arch Argent Pediatr 2018 Apr;116(2):98-104

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: Complications can occur during esophagoscopy as a result of applied procedure in children, especially during dilation techic. Our aim was to identify cardio-respiratory alterations during esophagoscopy with or without baloon dilation under anesthesia in children, and to investigate the postoperative complications.

Methods: Prospective, observational study of endoscopic procedures in patients 0-16 years. The patients were divided into two groups: the endoscopy-dilation group (Group ED: endoscopy and balloon dilation due to esophageal stricture) and endoscopy without dilation (Group E: endoscopy for diagnostic reasons, control esophagoscopy or sclerotherapy). Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters alterations and complications during endoscopy, dilation and two-hours follow-up time in the postoperative recovery room were recorded.

Results: 102 procedures in 60 patients were included. Peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) values significantly increased after endoscopy in both groups (p<0.001). There was a significant increase in mean PIP values in the dilation group during the procedure (p<0,001). The difference in PIP values before and after the endoscopy was negatively correlated with age in both groups. When the groups were subdivided taking two years of age as a cut-off point in comparing PIP difference before-after endoscopy, PIP increase was statistically significant in both groups under two-years old. In the dilation group, statistically significant increase of HR was detected during the procedure (p<0,001).

Conclusion: During endoscopy PIP increased in patients with or without baloon dilation especially in the dilation group. PIP increase was higher in younger children. Severe respiratory and cardiovascular complications during balloon dilation under general anesthesia should be carefully observed and managed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5546/aap.2018.eng.98DOI Listing
April 2018

Laryngotracheal edema due to thermal injury: A complication after thyroidectomy in children.

Arch Argent Pediatr 2017 02;115(1):e31-e33

Postoperative respiratory insufficiency is a serious complication of total thyroidectomies which can be multifactorial, especially in children. We report two siblings who had undergone thyroidectomy with subsequent respiratory distress. Electrothermal bipolar and harmonic scalpel were used during thyroid dissections. Both patients had early postoperative respiratory problems. The older one suffered from mild respiratory distress for 24 hours and then he spontaneously recovered. The younger one was extubated but then she had serious stridor accompanied with abdominal and intercostal retractions. She was re-intubated and admitted to ICU for mechanical ventilatory support, where she stayed for 14 days due to multiple failed extubation attempts. The symptoms were more severe in the younger child probably due to softer tracheal wall and weaker tracheal cartilages. We should keep in mind the probable postoperative respiratory complications due to thermal injury or inappropriate surgical technique after thyroid surgeries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5546/aap.2017.eng.e31DOI Listing
February 2017

Efficacy of intravenous paracetamol and dexketoprofen on postoperative pain and morphine consumption after a lumbar disk surgery.

J Neurosurg Anesthesiol 2013 Apr;25(2):143-7

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, 34098 Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: We compared the analgesic effects of intravenous (IV) paracetamol with that of dexketoprofen on postoperative pain and morphine consumption during the first 24 hour after a lumbar disk surgery.

Methods: This prospective, placebo-controlled, double blind study investigated the analgesic effects of IV paracetamol and dexketoprofen on postoperative pain, morphine consumption, and morphine-related side effects after a lumbar disk surgery. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists 1 or 2 status patients scheduled for elective lumbar disk surgery under general anesthesia were included in the study. Patients were treated using patient-controlled analgesia with morphine for 24 hours after a lumbar disk surgery and randomized to receive IV paracetamol 1 g, dexketoprofen 50 mg, or isotonic saline (placebo). The primary endpoint was pain intensity measured by the visual analogue scale, and secondary endpoints were morphine consumption and related side effects.

Results: Pain intensity was lower in the dexketoprofen group (P=0.01) but not in the paracetamol group (P=0.21) when compared with the control group. Cumulative morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects did not reveal significant differences between the groups.

Conclusions: The study showed that pain intensity during 24 hours after the lumbar disk surgery was significantly lowered by dexketoprofen, but not with paracetamol, as a supplemental analgesic to morphine patient-controlled analgesia when compared with controls.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANA.0b013e31827464afDOI Listing
April 2013

Efficacy of intravenous paracetamol, metamizol and lornoxicam on postoperative pain and morphine consumption after lumbar disc surgery.

Eur J Anaesthesiol 2010 May;27(5):428-32

Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background And Objective: The combination of opioids with supplemental analgesics is commonly used for additive or synergistic analgesic effects. We aimed to determine the most advantageous supplemental analgesic for postoperative pain relief after lumbar disc surgery.

Methods: This prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study compared the effects of intravenous metamizol, paracetamol and lornoxicam on postoperative pain control, morphine consumption and side effects after lumbar disc surgery. Eighty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists classification 1 or 2 scheduled for elective lumbar disc surgery under general anaesthesia were treated using patient-controlled analgesia with morphine until 24 h postoperatively and randomized to receive additional intravenous injections of metamizol 1 g, paracetamol 1 g, lornoxicam 8 mg or isotonic saline 0.9% (placebo). The primary endpoint was pain over 24 h after surgery measured by visual analogue scale. Secondary endpoints were morphine consumption and side effects.

Results: During the 24 h study period, pain was reduced in the metamizol (P = 0.001) and paracetamol (P = 0.04) groups, but not in the lornoxicam (P = 0.20) group compared with the control group. Further analysis revealed that pain scores in the metamizol group were significantly lower than in the lornoxicam group (P = 0.031). Although the rate of morphine consumption in the paracetamol group was decreased over time (P < 0.001), the total amounts of morphine consumed in 24 h were not different between groups. No significant differences with respect to morphine-related side effects were observed between groups.

Conclusion: Metamizol or paracetamol, but not lornoxicam, provides effective analgesia following lumbar disc surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EJA.0b013e32833731a4DOI Listing
May 2010