Publications by authors named "Ayodeji Kadri"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Diabetic ketoacidosis fluid management in children: systematic review and meta-analyses.

Arch Dis Child 2022 Jun 23. Epub 2022 Jun 23.

Paediatric Emergency Department, Sidra Medicine, Doha, Qatar.

Importance: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus, which may lead to significant morbidity and mortality.

Objectives: To compare the safety and efficacy of liberalised versus conservative intravenous fluid regimens in the management of DKA in children.

Data Source And Study Selection: Databases from inception to January 2022: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were included. Only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that included children aged under 18 years were assessed. Two reviewers performed data assessment and extraction.

Data Extraction And Synthesis: Three studies out of 1536 citations were included.

Main Outcomes: The time to the recovery from the DKA; the frequency of paeditric intensive care unit (PICU) admissions; development of brain oedema; reduction in Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS); development of acute kidney injury and all-cause mortality.

Results: We included three RCTs (n=1457). No evidence of difference was noted in the GCS reduction (risk ratio (RR)=0.77, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.36) or development of brain oedema (RR=0.50, 95% CI 0.15 to 1.68). The time to recovery from DKA was longer in the conservative group (mean difference=1.42, 95% CI 0.28 to 2.56). Time to hospital discharge, adverse or serious adverse events were comparable in the two studied groups.

Conclusion: There is no evidence from this meta-analysis that rate of fluid administration has any effect on adverse neurological and other outcomes or length of hospital stay.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2022-324042DOI Listing
June 2022

Levetiracetam for convulsive status epilepticus in childhood: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Arch Dis Child 2020 Oct 15. Epub 2020 Oct 15.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Sidra Medicine, Doha, Qatar

Importance: Prolonged seizures are life-threatening emergencies associated with significant morbidity.

Objective: To determine the efficacy and safety of levetiracetam in treating convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) in childhood.

Data Sources And Study Selections: PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched from inception up to April 2020. Only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that included children aged 1 month-18 years were assessed. Two reviewers performed data assessment and extraction.

Data Extraction And Synthesis: Ten studies out of the 20 637 citations identified were included.

Main Outcomes: Cessation of seizure activities, time to cessation of seizure activities, need for rapid sequence intubation (RSI), intensive care unit (ICU) admission, recurrence of seizures at 24 hours, adverse events and all-cause mortality.

Results: We included 10 RCTs (n=1907). There was no significant difference in cessation of seizure activities when levetiracetam was compared with phenytoin (risk ratio (RR)=1.03, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.09), levetiracetam to fosphenytoin (RR=1.16, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.35) or levetiracetam to valproate (RR=1.10, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.27). No differences were found in relation to the timing of cessation of seizures for levetiracetam versus phenytoin (mean difference (MD)=-0.45, 95% CI -1.83 to 0.93), or levetiracetam versus fosphenytoin (MD=-0.70, 95% CI -4.26 to 2.86). There were no significant differences with regard to ICU admissions, adverse events, recurrence of seizure at 24 hours, RSI and all-cause mortality.

Conclusion: Levetiracetam is comparable to phenytoin, fosphenytoin and valproate as a second line treatment of paediatric CSE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2020-319573DOI Listing
October 2020

Analysis of genes of mitochondrial origin in the genus Entamoeba.

J Eukaryot Microbiol 2003 May-Jun;50(3):210-4

Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK.

The amitochondriate protistan parasite Entamoeba histolytica has lost most mitochondrial functions secondarily but has retained a reduced organelle of mitochondrial origin, the mitosome. We here investigate the presence, origins, and expression in other species of Entamoeba of three genes of mitochondrial origin--pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase and the mitochondrial-type chaperonins cpn60 and hsp70. The genes appear to be present in all species and specifically related, confirming that the E. histolytica mitosomal genes were not acquired recently by lateral transfer from another organism. Detection of expression was not possible in all cases under the culture conditions used, but several genes were induced during recovery from exposure to a heat shock. This includes the transhydrogenase, which to our knowledge has not been shown previously to be a heat-shock protein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1550-7408.2003.tb00119.xDOI Listing
August 2003
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