Publications by authors named "Ayman Taher"

14 Publications

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CD200 Immune-Checkpoint Peptide Elicits an Anti-glioma Response Through the DAP10 Signaling Pathway.

Neurotherapeutics 2021 Apr 7. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.

Numerous therapies aimed at driving an effective anti-glioma response have been employed over the last decade; nevertheless, survival outcomes for patients remain dismal. This may be due to the expression of immune-checkpoint ligands such as PD-L1 by glioblastoma (GBM) cells which interact with their respective receptors on tumor-infiltrating effector T cells curtailing the activation of anti-GBM CD8 T cell-mediated responses. Therefore, a combinatorial regimen to abolish immunosuppression would provide a powerful therapeutic approach against GBM. We developed a peptide ligand (CD200AR-L) that binds an uncharacterized CD200 immune-checkpoint activation receptor (CD200AR). We sought to test the hypothesis that CD200AR-L/CD200AR binding signals via he DAP10&12 pathways through in vitro studies by analyzing transcription, protein, and phosphorylation, and in vivo loss of function studies using inhibitors to select signaling molecules. We report that CD200AR-L/CD200AR binding induces an initial activation of the DAP10&12 pathways followed by a decrease in activity within 30 min, followed by reactivation via a positive feedback loop. Further in vivo studies using DAP10&12KO mice revealed that DAP10, but not DAP12, is required for tumor control. When we combined CD200AR-L with an immune-stimulatory gene therapy, in an intracranial GBM model in vivo, we observed increased median survival, and long-term survivors. These studies are the first to characterize the signaling pathway used by the CD200AR, demonstrating a novel strategy for modulating immune checkpoints for immunotherapy currently being analyzed in a phase I adult trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13311-021-01038-1DOI Listing
April 2021

Evaluating efficacy of intravenous carbetocin in reducing blood loss during abdominal myomectomy: a randomized controlled trial.

Fertil Steril 2021 Mar 16;115(3):793-801. Epub 2021 Jan 16.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of carbetocin versus placebo in decreasing intraoperative blood loss and the need for blood transfusion during abdominal myomectomy.

Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Setting: Tertiary university hospital from September 2019 to February 2020.

Patient(s): A total of 138 women with symptomatic leiomyoma who were candidates for abdominal myomectomy (n = 69 in each group).

Intervention(s): We randomized the study participants in a 1:1 ratio to carbetocin and placebo groups. Intravenous 100 μg carbetocin or placebo was administered slowly after induction of anesthesia.

Main Outcome Measure(s): Intraoperative blood loss, need for blood transfusion, postoperative hemoglobin, operative time, length of hospitalization, and drug side-effects.

Result(s): The baseline characteristics were similar among all groups. Carbetocin had significantly lower intraoperative blood loss compared with placebo (mean difference 184 mL). Hemoglobin level 24 hours after surgery was significantly lower in the placebo group than in the carbetocin group (9.1 ± 0.8 vs. 10.3 ± 0.6 g/dL). Eight women in the carbetocin group needed blood transfusion compared with 17 in placebo group. Operative time, length of hospitalization, and side-effects were similar in both groups.

Conclusion(s): A single preoperative intravenous dose of 100 μg carbetocin is a simple, practical, and effective method of decreasing intraoperative blood loss and the need for blood transfusion during abdominal myomectomy, with tolerable, few, nonsignificant side-effects.

Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT04083625.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2020.09.132DOI Listing
March 2021

Inhibition of 2-hydroxyglutarate elicits metabolic reprogramming and mutant IDH1 glioma immunity in mice.

J Clin Invest 2021 Feb;131(4)

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1-R132H; mIDH1) is a hallmark of adult gliomas. Lower grade mIDH1 gliomas are classified into 2 molecular subgroups: 1p/19q codeletion/TERT-promoter mutations or inactivating mutations in α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and TP53. This work focuses on glioma subtypes harboring mIDH1, TP53, and ATRX inactivation. IDH1-R132H is a gain-of-function mutation that converts α-ketoglutarate into 2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). The role of D-2HG within the tumor microenvironment of mIDH1/mATRX/mTP53 gliomas remains unexplored. Inhibition of D-2HG, when used as monotherapy or in combination with radiation and temozolomide (IR/TMZ), led to increased median survival (MS) of mIDH1 glioma-bearing mice. Also, D-2HG inhibition elicited anti-mIDH1 glioma immunological memory. In response to D-2HG inhibition, PD-L1 expression levels on mIDH1-glioma cells increased to similar levels as observed in WT-IDH gliomas. Thus, we combined D-2HG inhibition/IR/TMZ with anti-PDL1 immune checkpoint blockade and observed complete tumor regression in 60% of mIDH1 glioma-bearing mice. This combination strategy reduced T cell exhaustion and favored the generation of memory CD8+ T cells. Our findings demonstrate that metabolic reprogramming elicits anti-mIDH1 glioma immunity, leading to increased MS and immunological memory. Our preclinical data support the testing of IDH-R132H inhibitors in combination with IR/TMZ and anti-PDL1 as targeted therapy for mIDH1/mATRX/mTP53 glioma patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI139542DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7880418PMC
February 2021

Effect of self-administered vaginal dinoprostone on pain perception during copper intrauterine device insertion in parous women: a randomized controlled trial.

Fertil Steril 2020 Oct 28;114(4):861-868. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Objective(s): To assess efficacy and safety of self-administered 3 mg dinoprostone vaginally in reducing pain during copper intrauterine device (IUD) insertion in parous women.

Design: Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

Setting: Family planning clinic in a tertiary referral hospital.

Patient(s): Multiparous women who were attending a family planning clinic and requesting copper IUD insertion.

Interventions(s): We randomly assigned 160 participants into two groups: The dinoprostone group (n = 80) received 3 mg dinoprostone vaginally, and the placebo group (n = 80) received placebo vaginally.

Main Outcome Measure(s): Our primary outcome was mean pain scores during IUD insertion. Our secondary outcomes were mean pain scores during tenaculum application, during uterine sounding, and 15 minutes after insertion, ease of insertion, satisfaction score, need for additional analgesics, and side-effects.

Result(s): Both groups showed no significant difference in anticipated pain score (P=.41), pain during tenaculum placement (P=.22), and pain during sound insertion (P=.07). The dinoprostone group had significantly lower pain scores during IUD insertion (34.8 ± 10.1 vs. 57.8 ± 11.8) and 15 minutes after insertion (20.6 ± 6.4 vs. 29.6 ± 6.2), easier IUD insertion (43.6 ± 21.9 vs. 64.7 ± 18.1), and higher satisfaction (83.9 ± 11.6 vs. 63.0 ± 9.1) compared with the placebo group. Fewer patients required additional analgesics in the dinoprostone group compared with the placebo group (P=.01). Side-effects were similar between the groups.

Conclusion(s): Self-administered 3 mg dinoprostone vaginally before copper IUD insertion in parous women reduces pain scores during IUD insertion, making insertion easier and increasing women's satisfaction, with tolerable side-effects.

Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT04046302.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2020.05.004DOI Listing
October 2020

Tumor mutational burden predicts survival in patients with low-grade gliomas expressing mutated IDH1.

Neurooncol Adv 2020 Jan-Dec;2(1):vdaa042. Epub 2020 Mar 27.

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan Medical School, MSRB II, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Background: Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. High-Grade Gliomas have a median survival (MS) of 18 months, while Low-Grade Gliomas (LGGs) have an MS of approximately 7.3 years. Seventy-six percent of patients with LGG express mutated isocitrate dehydrogenase (mIDH) enzyme. Survival of these patients ranges from 1 to 15 years, and tumor mutational burden ranges from 0.28 to 3.85 somatic mutations/megabase per tumor. We tested the hypothesis that the tumor mutational burden would predict the survival of patients with tumors bearing mIDH.

Methods: We analyzed the effect of tumor mutational burden on patients' survival using clinical and genomic data of 1199 glioma patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas and validated our results using the Glioma Longitudinal AnalySiS consortium.

Results: High tumor mutational burden negatively correlates with the survival of patients with LGG harboring mIDH ( = .005). This effect was significant for both Oligodendroglioma (LGG-IDH-; MS = 2379 vs 4459 days in high vs low, respectively; = .005) and Astrocytoma (LGG-IDH-; MS = 2286 vs 4412 days in high vs low respectively; = .005). There was no differential representation of frequently mutated genes (eg, , , , and ) in either group. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed an enrichment in Gene Ontologies related to cell cycle, DNA-damage response in high versus low tumor mutational burden. Finally, we identified 6 gene sets that predict survival for LGG-IDH- and LGG-IDH-.

Conclusions: we demonstrate that tumor mutational burden is a powerful, robust, and clinically relevant prognostic factor of MS in mIDH patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/noajnl/vdaa042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7212865PMC
March 2020

Medical therapy options for endometriosis related pain, which is better? A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod 2021 Jan 29;50(1):101798. Epub 2020 May 29.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Our objective was to assess and rank different pharmacological interventions for relieving endometriosis-related pain. We conducted an online bibliographic search in different databases from their inception until March 2019. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed different medical therapies in the management of endometriosis-related pain. We applied this network meta-analysis (NMA) based on the frequentist approach using statistical package "netmeta" (version 1.0-1) in R software. Our main outcomes were the change in severity of pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea score, non-menstrual pelvic pain score, and dyspareunia score. Overall, 36 RCTs were included in this study (patients no. = 7942). Dienogest (0.94), combined hormonal contraceptives (CHCs) (0.782), and elagolix (0.38) were the highest-ranked interventions for reducing the severity of pelvic pain at three months, while at six months, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues (0.75), levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) (0.73), and dienogest (0.65) were linked to more reduction in pelvic pain. The ranking p-score showed that GnRH analogues was the highest-ranked treatment for reducing dysmenorrhea at 3 months (1.00), while CHCs were the highest-ranked treatment at 6 months (0.97), followed by GnRH analogues (0.89). GnRH analogues (0.63) and elagolix (0.54) at three months while desogestrel (0.94) and CHCs (0.91) at six months were the highest-ranked treatment to reduce non-menstrual pelvic pain. GnRH analogues and elagolix were the highest-ranked pharmacologic therapies for reducing dyspareunia. In conclusion, CHCs, GnRH analogues, progesterone, and elagolix were the best approaches in reducing the pain of endometriosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jogoh.2020.101798DOI Listing
January 2021

Alalfy modified cervical inversion technique as a tamponade in controlling PPH in placenta previa, a multicentric double blind randomized controlled trial.

J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2019 Oct 21:1-7. Epub 2019 Oct 21.

Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Helwan Faculty of Medicine, Helwan University, Helwan, Egypt.

Postpartum hemorrhage that occurs frequently with placenta previa is one of the causes of maternal mortality in 14% in developing countries. To assess efficacy of cervical inversion as a tamponade in controlling bed of placenta in cases of placenta previa. A prospective randomized controlled study was conducted among a total of 240 pregnant women with placenta previa (120 subjected to Alalfy modified cervical inversion technique plus hemostatic sutures and 120 was not subjected cervical inversion and only was subjected to hemostatic sutures in Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at Suez Canal University hospital, Helwan University and Algezeerah hospital for a planned cesarean section). The mean intraoperative blood loss, the intraoperative time, and the postoperative hemoglobin show a statistically significant difference between cases with placenta previa who were exposed to cervical inversion in comparison to cases that had no cervical inversion with a -value <.001. Modified cervical inversion (Alalfy technique) as a tamponade when added to hemostatic sutures to the placental bed is an easy, rapid, and efficient procedure that can decrease the amount of blood loss, time needed to stop bleeding per bed, total operative time, also it can decrease the need for blood transfusion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2019.1678140DOI Listing
October 2019

The efficacy of local anesthetics in pain relief during colposcopic-guided biopsy: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2019 Jun 1;237:189-197. Epub 2019 May 1.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Egypt. Electronic address:

Background: Colposcopy is an office gynecological procedure used for cervical evaluation in patients with abnormal cervical cytology. It is considered an important tool for early detection of cases of cervical cancer.

Objective: To evaluate the evidence from published randomized clinical trials (RCTs) about the efficacy of local anesthetics in pain relief during colposcopic-guided biopsy.

Data Sources: Several electronic databases included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ISI and Scopus were searched using the relevant MeSH terms.

Methods Of Study Selection: All RCTs assessing the effect of local anesthetics in relieving pain during colposcopy were considered for this meta-analysis. There were 1339 studies identified of which 11 studies deemed eligible for this review. We performed quality and risk of bias assessment for all included studies.

Data Extraction: Three researchers independently extracted the data from the individual articles and entered it into RevMan software. The extracted outcomes included pain scores and the duration of the procedure.

Results: Eleven RCTs were included. Local anesthesia (LA) was associated with higher pain at speculum insertion than control (SMD = 0.23, 95% CI [0.03, 0.43]). While, LA significantly reduced biopsy pain than control (SMD= -0.57, 95% CI [-0.94, -0.20]). The overall pooled estimate showed no significant difference between LA and control regarding postprocedural pain, pain on endocervical curettage, pain expectancy, and overall pain scores.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that local anesthetics are effective in pain relief during a colposcopic-guided biopsy; however there is no strong evidence to recommend its use in current practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2019.04.047DOI Listing
June 2019

Efficacy and safety of tramadol in pain relief during diagnostic outpatient hysteroscopy: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Fertil Steril 2019 03 30;111(3):547-552. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt. Electronic address:

Objective: To evaluate the evidence about the safety and efficacy of tramadol in pain relief during diagnostic outpatient hysteroscopy (OH).

Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Setting: Not applicable.

Patient(s): Patients undergoing diagnostic OH received tramadol versus those who were administered placebo.

Intervention(s): Electronic databases were searched using the following MeSH terms (tramadol OR opioids OR opioid OR narcotic OR narcotics) AND (hysteroscopy OR hysteroscopic).

Main Outcome Measure(s): Pain assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) during OH, immediately and 30 minutes after the procedure.

Result(s): One hundred thirteen studies were identified of which four randomized clinical trials were deemed eligible for this review (tramadol: n = 209; placebo: n = 209). The pooled estimate showed that tramadol significantly reduced VAS during procedure than placebo (weighted mean difference [WMD] = -1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.78 to -0.88, I = 3%, P = .36). In addition, tramadol significantly reduced VAS immediately after the procedure (WMD = -1.05; 95% CI -1.49 to -0.61, I= 0, P = .84) and 30 minutes after (WMD = -0.98; 95% CI -1.30 to -0.65, I = 0, P = .88).

Conclusion(s): This meta-analysis suggests that tramadol is safe, effective, and gives favorable results in reducing pain during diagnostic OH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2018.10.026DOI Listing
March 2019

Evaluating different pain lowering medications during intrauterine device insertion: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Fertil Steril 2019 03 2;111(3):553-561.e4. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Objective: To synthesize the evidence on the most effective medications for the relief of intrauterine device (IUD) insertion-related pain.

Design: Systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs).

Setting: Not applicable.

Patient(s): Patients undergoing IUD insertion who received different medications for pain relief versus those who received placebo.

Intervention(s): Electronic search in the following bibliographic databases: Medline via PubMed, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and ScienceDirect.

Main Outcome Measure(s): Visual analog scale (VAS) pain score during tenaculum placement, IUD insertion, and 5 to 20 minutes after insertion, the score of easiness of insertion and the need for additional analgesics.

Result(s): The present review included 38 RCTs (n = 6,314 patients). The network meta-analysis showed that lidocaine-prilocaine cream (genital mucosal application) statistically significantly reduced pain at tenaculum placement compared with placebo (mean difference -2.38; 95% confidence interval, -4.07 to -0.68). In the ranking probability order, lidocaine-prilocaine cream ranked the highest in reducing the pain at tenaculum placement, followed by lidocaine (paracervical). Similarly, lidocaine-prilocaine cream ranked as the highest treatment in pain reduction during IUD insertion, followed by lidocaine (paracervical).

Conclusion(s): Lidocaine-prilocaine cream is the most effective medication that can be used for IUD insertion-related pain. Other medications are not effective.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2018.11.012DOI Listing
March 2019

Early versus delayed removal of indwelling urinary catheter after elective cesarean delivery: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2020 Aug 7;33(16):2818-2825. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

Timing of removal of the indwelling urinary catheter after elective cesarean delivery (CD) is controversial. Early removal could be associated with fewer urinary symptoms. This review aims to evaluate the evidence from published randomized clinical trials (RCTs) about the outcomes of early versus delayed removal of indwelling urinary catheter after elective cesarean delivery (CD). Electronic databases were searched using the following MeSH terms (early Or Late Or immediate OR delayed removal) AND (Urinary catheter) AND (cesarean section OR cesarean delivery OR CS) All RCTs assessing the timing of removal of urinary catheter were considered for this meta-analysis. One hundred seventy-two studies were identified of which three studies deemed eligible for this review. Quality and risk of bias assessment were performed for all studies. Two researchers independently extracted the data from the individual articles and entered into RevMan software. The relative risk (RR), the weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. The extracted outcomes were significant bacteriuria, urinary symptoms (urinary retention necessitating re-catheterization, dysuria, urinary frequency, urgency) postoperative oral rehydration and length of hospital stay. Three RCTs (early removal:  = 298 and delayed removal:  = 311) were included. The pooled estimate showed that early removal significantly reduced dysuria (RR = 0.60, 95% CI [0.38, 0.95], =.03), urinary frequency (RR = 0.32, 95% CI [0.16, 0.66], =.002) and significant bacteriuria (RR = 0.49, 95% CI [0.30, 0.83], =.007) than delayed removal. This meta-analysis suggests that early removal of the indwelling urinary catheter in patients who underwent elective CD showed significant less dysuria, less urinary frequency and a decrease in the incidence of significant bacteriuria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2018.1557142DOI Listing
August 2020

Effect of subcutaneous tissue closure technique in cesarean section on postoperative wound complications in obese Egyptian women.

J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2019 Aug 20;32(15):2452-2459. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

b Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , Kasralainy, Cairo University , Cairo , Egypt.

Subcutaneous tissue closure technique is a wide area of interest for obstetricians who perform cesarean section especially on obese women while many observers studied in an extensive manner postoperative pain and wound cosmetic results.

Aim Of The Work: The main goal of our work was to display the differences in wound outcome results as regard postoperative wound complications comparing the two widely implemented techniques in subcutaneous tissue closure (interrupted versus continuous methods).

Results: A comparative analysis between continuous and interrupted techniques regarding wound complications (gapping, seroma, erythema, and infection) showing statistical significant differences in all four wound complications presented with p values = .019, .011, .015, and .001, in consecutive order with odds ratio in wound gapping = 5.239, wound seroma OR = 9.429, wound erythema OR = 3.709, and wound infection OR = 6.136.

Conclusions: Subcutaneous wound closure using interrupted technique of suturing in obese patients is superior to continuous technique as regard wound complications. Clinical trials.gov ID Identifier (NCT03354078).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2018.1438399DOI Listing
August 2019

Cervical Priming by Vaginal or Oral Misoprostol Before Operative Hysteroscopy: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial.

J Minim Invasive Gynecol 2016 Nov - Dec;23(7):1107-1112. Epub 2016 Aug 11.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt.

Study Objective: To evaluate whether misoprostol oral is as effective as vaginal tablets for cervical ripening.

Design: Randomized controlled trial involving a parallel, double-blinded study (Canadian Task Force Classification IB).

Setting: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cairo University Hospital, between January 2014 and January 2016.

Patients: Patients undergoing operative hysteroscopy for various indications.

Interventions: At 12 hours before hysteroscopy, the oral group received a 400-μg misoprostol tablet and 2 vaginal starch tablets. The vaginal group received 400 μg of misoprostol and 2 oral starch tablets. The control group received 2 oral starch and 2 vaginal starch tablets as placebo. Preoperative preparation was the same in all patients.

Measurements And Main Results: The main outcome measures were width of the endocervical canal, ease of dilatation, time to dilatation, and adverse effects. All subjects eligible for operative hysteroscopy (n = 430) were invited to participate. Twenty subjects refused, and 20 subjects were excluded. The enrolled subjects (n = 390) were randomized to oral misoprostol, vaginal misoprostol, or placebo. The differences in mean width of the endocervical canal between the oral and the control groups (4.79 ± 1.07 mm vs 3.92 ± 0.92 mm), and also between the vaginal and the control groups (4.25 ± 0.71 mm vs 3.92 ± 0.92 mm) were significant (p < .001 for both). Moreover, the difference in mean width of the endocervical canal between the oral and the vaginal groups was significant (4.79 ± 1.07 mm vs 4.25 ± 0.71 mm; p = .009). Cervical entry was easier in the oral and vaginal groups compared with the control group (mean Likert score, 4.25 ± 0.64 vs 4.22 ± 0.74 vs 2.55 ± 0.87; p < .001). In addition, the ease of cervical entry did not differ significantly between the oral and vaginal groups (p = .998). The mean time to dilatation was shorter in the oral group and the vaginal group (compared with the control group (48.98 ± 12.6 seconds vs 46.55 ± 15.32 seconds vs 178.05 ± 74.18 seconds; p < .001), but the difference between the oral and vaginal groups was not significant (p = .987). Adverse effects were comparable between groups (p > .05).

Conclusion: We found no statistically significant difference in the efficacy of cervical priming between oral misoprostol and vaginal misoprostol.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmig.2016.08.002DOI Listing
July 2017