Publications by authors named "Ayhan Ulusakarya"

25 Publications

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Impact of assessment frequency of patient-reported outcomes: an observational study using an eHealth platform in cancer patients.

Support Care Cancer 2021 May 8. Epub 2021 May 8.

Warwick Medical School & Cancer Research Centre, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.

Background And Aim: The evaluation of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in cancer has proven relevant positive clinical impact on patients' communication with healthcare professionals, decision-making for management, well-being, and overall survival. However, the optimal frequency of PRO assessment has yet to be defined. Based on the assumption that more frequent sampling would enhance accuracy, we aimed at identifying the optimal sampling frequency that does not miss clinically relevant insight.

Methods: We used pilot data from 31 advanced cancer patients who completed once daily the 19-item MD Anderson Symptom Inventory at home. The resulting dataset allowed us to compare different PRO assessment frequencies to daily sampling, i.e., alternate days (q2d), every third day (q3d), or once a week (q1w). We evaluated the sampling frequencies for two main outcomes: average symptom intensity and identification of severe symptoms.

Results: The majority of the differences between corresponding averages of daily data and those for q2d, q3d, and q1w datasets were close to 0, yet the extremes exceeded 5. Clinically meaningful differences, i.e., > 1, were observed in 0.76% of patient items for q2d, in 2.72% for q3d, and in 11.93% for q1w. Moreover, median values of missed instances of a severe symptom (i.e., > 6) were 14.6% for q2d, 27.8% for q3d, and 55.6% for q1w.

Conclusions: Our analysis suggests that in patients receiving chemotherapy for advanced cancer, increasing the density of PRO collection enhances the accuracy of PRO assessment to a clinically meaningful extent. This is valid for both computations of averages symptom burden and for the recognition of episodes of severe symptom intensity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-021-06262-1DOI Listing
May 2021

Anti-Programmed death-1 therapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A real-world experience.

Clin Case Rep 2021 Apr 20;9(4):2162-2167. Epub 2021 Feb 20.

Medical Oncology Department AP-HP Paul Brousse Hospital Villejuif France.

Nivolumab is an effective and safe treatment in HCC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.3970DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8077298PMC
April 2021

Efficacy and safety of chronomodulated irinotecan, oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin combination as first- or second-line treatment against metastatic colorectal cancer: Results from the International EORTC 05011 Trial.

Int J Cancer 2020 Dec 3. Epub 2020 Dec 3.

Division of Medical Oncology, San Camillo Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy.

The triplet combination of irinotecan, oxaliplatin and fluorouracil is an active frontline regimen in metastatic colorectal cancer, but scarce data exist on its use as salvage treatment. We aimed at assessing its safety and efficacy profiles with its circadian-based administration (chronoIFLO5) as either first- or second-line treatment, within the time-finding EORTC 05011 trial. Five-day chronoIFLO5 was administered every 3 weeks in patients with PS 0, 1 or 2. It consisted of chronomodulated irinotecan (180 mg/sqm), oxaliplatin (80 mg/sqm) and fluorouracil-leucovorin (2800 and 1200 mg/sqm, respectively). For our study, toxicity and antitumour activity were evaluated separately in first- and second-line settings. Primary endpoints included Grade 3-4 toxicity rates, best objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). One-hundred forty-nine and 44 patients were treated in first-line and second-line settings, respectively, with a total of 1138 cycles with median relative dose intensities of about 90%. Demographics were comparable in the two groups. Thirty-six (24.7%) and 10 (22.2%) patients experienced at least one episode of severe toxicity in first line and second line, respectively. Frontline chronoIFLO5 yielded an ORR of 62.3% [95% CI: 54.2-70.4] and resulted in median PFS and OS of 8.7 months [7.5-9.9] and 19.9 months [15.4-24.5]. Corresponding figures in second line were 37.5% [22.5-52.5], 6.7 months [4.8-8.9] and 16.3 months [11.8-20.8]. International and prospective evaluation revealed the favourable safety and efficacy profiles of chronoIFLO5, both as frontline and as salvage treatment against metastatic colorectal cancer. In particular, encouraging activity in second line was observed, with limited haematological toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33422DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8048520PMC
December 2020

Anti-Programmed Cell Death Protein 1 (PD-1) Immunotherapy for Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Liver Transplantation: A Report of Three Cases.

Cureus 2020 Oct 25;12(10):e11150. Epub 2020 Oct 25.

Medical Oncology, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP) Paul Brousse Hospital, Paris, FRA.

The treatment of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after liver transplantation is difficult due to the lack of effective treatment options. The available evidence on the emerging immunotherapy in liver transplantation is based on anecdotal experiences and requires additional investigations. To determine the efficacy and safety of immunotherapy in liver transplant recipients, we report three cases of recurrent metastatic HCC after liver transplantation who were treated with nivolumab as off-label salvage therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.11150DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7586420PMC
October 2020

A retrospective study of patient-tailored FOLFIRINOX as a first-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced biliary tract cancer.

BMC Cancer 2020 Jun 3;20(1):515. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

INSERM U935 Campus CNRS, Villejuif, France.

Background: FOLFIRINOX is a pillar first-line regimen in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Historically, biliary tract cancer (BTC) and pancreatic cancer have been treated similarly with gemcitabine alone or combined with a platinum compound. With growing evidence supporting the role of fluoropyrimidines in the treatment of BTC, we aimed at assessing the outcomes of patients (pts) with BTC on frontline FOLFIRINOX.

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data of all our consecutive patients with locally advanced (LA) or metastatic (M) BTC who were registered to receive FOLFIRINOX as a first-line therapy between 12/2013 and 11/2017 at Paul Brousse university hospital. The main endpoints were Overall Survival (OS), Time-to-Progression (TTP), best Objective Response Rate (ORR), Disease Control rate (DCR), secondary macroscopically-complete resection (res) and incidence of severe (grade 3-4) toxicity (tox).

Results: There were 17 male (40%) and 25 female (60%) pts. aged 36 to 84 years (median: 67). They had PS of 0 (55%) or 1 (45%), and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) (21 pts., 50%), gallbladder carcinoma (8 pts., 19%), perihilar CCA (7 pts., 17%), distal CCA (4 pts., 10%) and ampulloma (2 pts., 5%). BTC was LA or M in 10 (24%) and 32 pts. (76%) respectively. Biliary stent was placed in 14 pts. (33%). A median of 10 courses was given with median treatment duration of 6 months. There were no untoward toxicity issues, with no febrile neutropenia, emergency admission for toxicity or toxic death. We observed 12 partial responses (29%) and 19 disease stabilisations (45%). Six patients (14%) underwent secondary R0-R1 resection. Median TTP was 8 months [95%CL, 6-10] and median OS was 15 months [13-17]. Patients undergoing secondary resection displayed a 3-y disease-free rate of 83%.

Conclusions: First-line FOLFIRINOX offers promising results in patients with LA and M-BTC. It deserves prospective evaluation to further improve outcomes for advanced BTC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-020-07004-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7268699PMC
June 2020

Hepatic metastases resection after cetuximab: are we missing something?

Lancet Oncol 2020 05;21(5):e228

Centre Hépato-Biliaire, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paul Brousse Hospital, 94800 Villejuif, France; INSERM U935 Campus CNRS, Villejuif, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(20)30144-3DOI Listing
May 2020

Treatment intensification with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy in patients with liver-only colorectal metastases still unresectable after systemic induction chemotherapy - a randomized phase II study -- SULTAN UCGI 30/PRODIGE 53 (NCT03164655)- study protocol.

BMC Cancer 2020 Jan 30;20(1):74. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave Roussy, 114 rue Edouard Vaillant, 94805, Villejuif Cedex, France.

Background: Approximately 40% of colorectal cancer patients will develop colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). The most effective approach to increase long-term survival is CRLM complete resection. Unfortunately, only 10-15% of CRLM are initially considered resectable. The objective response rates (ORR) after current first-line systemic chemotherapy (sys-CT) regimens range from 40 to 80% and complete resection rates (CRR) range from 25 to 50% in patients with initially unresectable CRLM. When CRLM patients are not amenable to complete resection after induction of sys-CT, ORRs obtained with second-line sys-CT are much lower (between 10 and 30%) and consequently CRRs are also low (< 10%). Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) oxaliplatin may represent a salvage therapy in patients with CRLM unresectable after one or more sys-CT regimens with ORRs and CRRs up to 60 and 30%, respectively. This study is designed to evaluate the efficacy of an intensification strategy based on HAI oxaliplatin combined with sys-CT as a salvage treatment in patients with CRLM unresectable after at least 2 months of first-line induction sys-CT.

Objectives And Endpoints Of The Phase Ii Study: Our main objective is to investigate the efficacy, in term of CRR (R0-R1), of treatment intensification in patients with liver-only CRLM not amenable to curative-intent resection (and/or ablation) after at least 2 months of induction sys-CT. Patients will receive either HAI oxaliplatin plus systemic FOLFIRI plus targeted therapy (i.e. anti-EGFR antibody or bevacizumab) or conventional sys-CT plus targeted therapy (i.e. anti-EGFR or antiangiogenic antibody). Secondary objectives are to compare: progression-free survival, overall survival, objective response rate, depth of response, feasibility of delivering HAI oxaliplatin including HAI catheter-related complications, and toxicity (NCI-CTCAE v4.0).

Methods: This study is a multicenter, randomized, comparative phase II trial (power, 80%; two-sided alpha-risk, 5%). Patients will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive HAI oxaliplatin combined with systemic FOLFIRI plus targeted therapy (experimental arm) or the best sys-CT plus targeted therapy on the basis of their first-line prior sys-CT history and current guidelines (control arm). One hundred forty patients are required to account for non-evaluable patients.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, (NCT03164655). Trial registration date: 11th May 2017.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-020-6571-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6990591PMC
January 2020

The day after: correlates of patient-reported outcomes with actigraphy-assessed sleep in cancer patients at home (inCASA project).

Sleep 2019 10;42(10)

Cancer Chronotherapy Team, Cancer Research Centre, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Warwick Medical School, Coventry, UK.

Subjective sleep assessment in cancer patients poorly correlates with actigraphy parameters that usually encompass multiple nights. We aimed to determine the objective actigraphy measures that best correlated with subjective sleep ratings on a night-by-night basis in cancer patients. Thirty-one cancer patients daily self-rated sleep disturbances using the single dedicated item of the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (0-10 scale) with 18 other items, and continuously wore a wrist actigraph for 30 days. Objective sleep parameters were computed from the actigraphy nighttime series, and correlated with subjective sleep disturbances reported on the following day, using repeated measures correlations. Multilevel Poisson regression analysis was performed to identify the objective and subjective parameters that affected subjective sleep rating. Poor subjective sleep score was correlated with poor sleep efficiency (rrm = -0.13, p = 0.002) and large number of wake episodes (rrm = 0.12, p = 0.005) on the rated night. Multilevel analysis demonstrated that the expected sleep disturbance score was affected by the joint contribution of the wake episodes (exp(β) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval = 1.00 to 1.02, p = 0.016), fatigue (exp(β) = 1.35, 95% confidence interval = 1.15 to 1.55, p < 0.001) and drowsiness (exp(β) = 1.70, 95% confidence interval = 1.19 to 2.62, p = 0.018), self-rated the following evening, and sleep disturbance experienced one night before (exp(β) = 1.77, 95% confidence interval = 1.41 to 2.22, p < 0.001). The night-by-night approach within a multidimensional home tele-monitoring framework mainly identified the objective number of wake episodes computed from actigraphy records as the main determinant of the severity of sleep complaint in cancer patients on chemotherapy. This quantitative information remotely obtained in real time from cancer patients provides a novel framework for streamlining and evaluating interventions toward sleep improvement in cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz146DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7587155PMC
October 2019

Patient-tailored FOLFIRINOX as first line treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2019 Apr;98(16):e15341

Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Department of Medical Oncology, Paul Brousse Hospital.

FOLFIRINOX is one of the most effective reference regimens in the 1st line treatment of locally advanced (LA) and metastatic pancreatic cancer (mPC), despite its high toxicity. We evaluated our real-life experience with "patient-tailored intent to treat FOLFIRINOX" in patients with LA or mPC compared to other reports along with the pivotal phase III trial.We analyzed data from all consecutive patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with dose-modified FOLFIRINOX in 2016 at Paul Brousse University Hospital. Irinotecan was administered whenever initial serum bilirubin was <1.5 × upper limit of normal. Oxaliplatin was stopped for severe sensory neuropathy. Initial dose reductions were made according to patient profile (eg, age, comorbidities) and later due to toxicity. The treatment was continued until surgery or disease progression. Endpoints were time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), and secondary complete resection (R0R1).Thirty-seven patients with unresectable LA or mPC received patient-tailored FOLFIRINOX as 1st line chemotherapy. There were 22 male (59%) and 15 female patients (41%) aged 44 to 81 years with LA (18 patients, 49%) and mPC (19 patients, 51%). They had World Health Organization-performance status of 0 (59%) or 1 (41%). A total of 384 cycles were administered. Median dose intensities (mg/m/w) were 28.9 for oxaliplatin, 56.8 for irinotecan, and 886.2 for 5-fluorouracil. Thirty-four patients were assessed for response; ORR and disease control rates were 47% and 85%, respectively. R0R1 rate was 30%. Median TTP and OS were 9.6 and 14.6 months. LA disease was associated with significantly longer TTP and OS (P < .001).FOLFIRINOX with patient-tailored dose adaptations seems to offer better results in patients with advanced PC. This approach in the neoadjuvant setting results in a macroscopic R0R1 in 61% of patients with initially unresectable disease. It deserves prospective evaluation to further improve outcomes in the management of advanced PC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000015341DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6494255PMC
April 2019

Home-Based e-Health Platform for Multidimensional Telemonitoring of Symptoms, Body Weight, Sleep, and Circadian Activity: Relevance for Chronomodulated Administration of Irinotecan, Fluorouracil-Leucovorin, and Oxaliplatin at Home-Results From a Pilot Study.

JCO Clin Cancer Inform 2018 12;2:1-15

Pasquale Innominato, North Wales Cancer Centre, Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, Denbighshire; Pasquale Innominato, Sandra Komarzynski, and Francis Lévi, Warwick Medical School, Coventry, United Kingdom; Pasquale Innominato, Sandra Komarzynski, Ayhan Ulusakarya, Mohamed Bouchahda, and Francis Lévi, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Unit 935; Ayhan Ulusakarya, Mohamed Bouchahda, Mazen Haydar, Rachel Bossevot-Desmaris, Magali Mocquery, Virginie Plessis, and Francis Lévi, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif; and Abdoulaye Karaboué, AK-SCIENCE, Research and Therapeutic Innovation, Vitry-sur-Seine, France.

Purpose: To assess the impact of chronomodulated irinotecan fluorouracil-leucovorin and oxaliplatin (chronoIFLO4) delivered at home on the daily life of patients with cancer in real time using a home-based e-Health multifunction and multiuser platform. This involved multidimensional telemonitoring of circadian rest-activity rhythm (CircAct), sleep, patient-reported outcome measures, and body weight changes (BWCs).

Patients And Methods: Patients received chronoIFLO4 fortnightly at home. Patients completed the 19-item MD Anderson Symptom Inventory on an interactive electronic screen, weighed themselves on a dedicated scale, and continuously wore a wrist accelerometer for CircAct and sleep monitoring. Daily data were securely teletransmitted to a specific server accessible by the hospital team. The clinically relevant CircAct parameter dichotomy index I < O and sleep efficiency (SE) were calculated. The dynamic patterns over time of patient-reported outcome measures, BWC, I < O, and SE informed the oncology team on tolerance in real time.

Results: The platform was installed in the home of 11 patients (48 to 72 years of age; 45% men; 27% with performance status = 0), who were instructed on its use on site. They received 26 cycles and provided 5,891 data points of 8,736 expected (67.4%). The most severe MD Anderson Symptom Inventory scores were: interference with work (mean: 5.1 of 10) or general activity (4.9), fatigue (4.9), distress (4.2), and appetite loss (3.6). Mean BWC was -0.9%, and mean SE remained > 82%. CircAct disruption (I < O ≤ 97.5%) was observed in four (15%) cycles before chronoIFLO4 start and in five (19%) cycles at day 14.

Conclusion: The patient-centered multidimensional telemonitoring solution implemented here was well accepted by patients receiving multidrug chemotherapy at home. Moreover, it demonstrated that chronoIFLO4 was a safe therapeutic option. Such integrated technology allows the design of innovative management approaches, ultimately improving patients' experience with chemotherapy, wellbeing, and outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/CCI.17.00125DOI Listing
December 2018

Circadian rest-activity rhythm as an objective biomarker of patient-reported outcomes in patients with advanced cancer.

Cancer Med 2018 09 7;7(9):4396-4405. Epub 2018 Aug 7.

Cancer Chronotherapy Team, Cancer Research Centre, Warwick Medical School, Coventry, UK.

Background: Psychosocial symptoms often cluster together, are refractory to treatment, and impair health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in cancer patients. The contribution of circadian rhythm alterations to systemic symptoms has been overlooked in cancer, despite a causal link shown under jet lag and shift work conditions. We investigated whether the circadian rest-activity rhythm provides a reliable and objective estimate of the most frequent patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs).

Methods: Two datasets were used, each involving concomitant 3-day time series of wrist actigraphy and HR-QoL questionnaires: EORTC QLQ-C30 was completed once by 237 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer; MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) was completed daily by 31 patients with advanced cancer on continuous actigraphy monitoring, providing 1015 paired data points. Circadian function was assessed using the clinically validated dichotomy index I < O. Nonparametric tests compared PROMs and I < O. Effect sizes were computed. Sensitivity subgroup and temporal dynamics analyses were also performed.

Results: I < O values were significantly lower with increasing symptom severity and worsening HR-QoL domains. Fatigue and anorexia were worse in patients with circadian disruption. The differences were both statistically and clinically significant (P < 0.001; d ≥ 0.33). Physical and social functioning, and global quality/enjoyment of life were significantly better in patients with robust circadian rhythm (P < 0.001; d ≥ 0.26). Sensitivity analyses validated these findings.

Conclusion: Objectively determined circadian disruption was consistently and robustly associated with clinically meaningfully severe fatigue, anorexia, and interference with physical and social functioning. This supports an important role of the circadian system in the determination of cancer patients' HR-QoL and symptoms that deserves therapeutic exploitation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cam4.1711DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6143939PMC
September 2018

Relevance of a Mobile Internet Platform for Capturing Inter- and Intrasubject Variabilities in Circadian Coordination During Daily Routine: Pilot Study.

J Med Internet Res 2018 06 11;20(6):e204. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Cancer Chronotherapy Team, School of Medicine, University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.

Background: Experimental and epidemiologic studies have shown that circadian clocks' disruption can play an important role in the development of cancer and metabolic diseases. The cellular clocks outside the brain are effectively coordinated by the body temperature rhythm. We hypothesized that concurrent measurements of body temperature and rest-activity rhythms would assess circadian clocks coordination in individual patients, thus enabling the integration of biological rhythms into precision medicine.

Objective: The objective was to evaluate the circadian clocks' coordination in healthy subjects and patients through simultaneous measurements of rest-activity and body temperature rhythms.

Methods: Noninvasive real-time measurements of rest-activity and chest temperature rhythms were recorded during the subject's daily life, using a dedicated new mobile electronic health platform (PiCADo). It involved a chest sensor that jointly measured accelerations, 3D orientation, and skin surface temperature every 1-5 min and relayed them out to a mobile gateway via Bluetooth Low Energy. The gateway tele-transmitted all stored data to a server via General Packet Radio Service every 24 hours. The technical capabilities of PiCADo were validated in 55 healthy subjects and 12 cancer patients, whose rhythms were e-monitored during their daily routine for 3-30 days. Spectral analyses enabled to compute rhythm parameters values, with their 90% confidence limits, and their dynamics in each subject.

Results: All the individuals displayed a dominant circadian rhythm in activity with maxima occurring from 12:09 to 20:25. This was not the case for the dominant temperature period, which clustered around 24 hours for 51 out of 67 subjects (76%), and around 12 hours for 13 others (19%). Statistically significant sex- and age-related differences in circadian coordination were identified in the noncancerous subjects, based upon the range of variations in temperature rhythm amplitudes, maxima (acrophases), and phase relations with rest-activity. The circadian acrophase of chest temperature was located at night for the majority of people, but it occurred at daytime for 26% (14/55) of the noncancerous people and 33% (4/12) of the cancer patients, thus supporting important intersubject differences in circadian coordination. Sex, age, and cancer significantly impacted the circadian coordination of both rhythms, based on their phase relationships.

Conclusions: Complementing rest-activity with chest temperature circadian e-monitoring revealed striking intersubject differences regarding human circadian clocks' coordination and timing during daily routine. To further delineate the clinical importance of such finding, the PiCADo platform is currently applied for both the assessment of health effects resulting from atypical work schedules and the identification of the key determinants of circadian disruption in cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/jmir.9779DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6018238PMC
June 2018

Relationship between subjective and actigraphy-measured sleep in 237 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

Qual Life Res 2017 10 27;26(10):2783-2791. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

Cancer Chronotherapy Unit, Cancer Research Centre, Warwick Medical School, Coventry, Warwickshire, UK.

Objective: Patients with cancers frequently experience sleep and circadian dysfunction. To date, only a few studies have used both a questionnaire and actigraphy for concomitant evaluation of sleep and circadian function in patients with cancer. We sought to evaluate objective sleep and circadian parameters in metastatic colon cancer (MCC) patients and their associations with symptoms and quality of life (QOL).

Methods: Patients reported subjective sleep problems on the EORTC QLQ-C30. Sleep and circadian parameters were calculated using a wrist-actigraph that patients wore for 72 h.

Results: 237 Patients with MCC (mean age: 60.4 years; range: 20.7-77.6; Male/Female ratio: 1.66) participated in this cross-sectional study. Subjective sleep problems were reported by 63.4% of patients (S+). No differences in any sleep parameters (sleep efficiency, sleep latency, total sleep time, total time in bed, wake after sleep onset, activity bathyphase) were observed between S+ and S- patients. However, S+ patients displayed a significantly worse circadian function than S- patients (96.4 vs 98.1%; p = 0.005). The presence of poor subjective sleep and objective circadian dysfunction negatively affected symptoms and QOL domains (p = 0.038).

Conclusions: Subjective report of sleep problems was not associated with worse objectively measured sleep parameters in patients with MCC although it was associated with disrupted circadian rest-activity rhythm and poorer QOL. These findings coincide with prior research in cancer patients in that an inconsistent relationship exists between subjective and objective sleep measurements on some sleep domains. This study supports the value of coupled evaluation of self-reported and objective measures of sleep and circadian function in cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11136-017-1617-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5711611PMC
October 2017

Clinical Relevance of the First Domomedicine Platform Securing Multidrug Chronotherapy Delivery in Metastatic Cancer Patients at Home: The inCASA European Project.

J Med Internet Res 2016 11 25;18(11):e305. Epub 2016 Nov 25.

Cancer Chronotherapy Unit, Cancer Research Centre, Warwick Medical School, Coventry, United Kingdom.

Background: Telehealth solutions can improve the safety of ambulatory chemotherapy, contributing to the maintenance of patients at their home, hence improving their well-being, all the while reducing health care costs. There is, however, need for a practicable multilevel monitoring solution, encompassing relevant outputs involved in the pathophysiology of chemotherapy-induced toxicity. Domomedicine embraces the delivery of complex care and medical procedures at the patient's home based on modern technologies, and thus it offers an integrated approach for increasing the safety of cancer patients on chemotherapy.

Objective: The objective was to evaluate patient compliance and clinical relevance of a novel integrated multiparametric telemonitoring domomedicine platform in cancer patients receiving multidrug chemotherapy at home.

Methods: Self-measured body weight, self-rated symptoms using the 19-item MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI), and circadian rest-activity rhythm recording with a wrist accelerometer (actigraph) were transmitted daily by patients to a server via the Internet, using a dedicated platform installed at home. Daily body weight changes, individual MDASI scores, and relative percentage of activity in-bed versus out-of-bed (I
Results: A total of 31 patients (males: 55% [17/31]; World Health Organization Performance Status=0: 29% (9/31); age range: 35-91 years) participated for a median of 58 days (38-313). They received a total of 102 chemotherapy courses (64.7% as outpatients). Overall full compliance was 59.7% (522/874), with at least one data available for 830/874 patient-days (95.0%), during the 30-day per-protocol span. Missing data rates were similar for each parameter. Patients were altogether satisfied with the use of the platform. Ten toxicity-related hospitalizations occurred in 6 patients. The combination of weighted circadian function (actigraphy parameter I
Conclusions: Multidimensional daily telemonitoring of body weight, circadian rest-activity rhythm, and patient-reported symptoms was feasible, satisfactory, and clinically relevant in patients on chemotherapy. This domomedicine platform constitutes a unique tool for the further development of safe home-based chemotherapy administration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/jmir.6303DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5148811PMC
November 2016

Subjective sleep and overall survival in chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

Sleep Med 2015 Mar 22;16(3):391-8. Epub 2015 Jan 22.

Center for Stress and Health, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA, USA.

Backround: Sleep disorders are prevalent in patients with advanced cancer. Their impact on clinical outcomes is not well understood.

Methods: A post-hoc analysis was conducted in 361 chemo-naïve patients with metastatic colorectal cancer completing twice the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire within a randomized international phase III trial. The study assessed the effect on overall survival (OS) of subjective sleep complaint, used as a normal or a time-dependent covariate (TDC), using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Prognostic analysis was conducted on the whole study population and separately in each treatment arm (conventional FOLFOX2, or chronomodulated chronoFLO4).

Results: Sleep problems were reported by 202 patients (56%) at baseline and by 188 (52%) on treatment. Sleep problems at baseline were independently associated with a higher risk of earlier death (HR: 1.36; p = 0.011), progression (HR: 1.43; p = 0.002) and poor treatment response (RR: 0.58; p = 0.016). TDC analysis confirmed the independent prognostic effect of sleep problems on OS (HR: 1.37; p = 0.008), while on treatment this effect was only observed using univariate analysis. The negative prognostic value of sleep problems on OS at baseline, on treatment, and as a TDC was greatest on chronoFLO4 compared to FOLFOX2.

Conclusions: Subjective sleep problems are associated with poor clinical outcomes in metastatic colorectal cancer patients and affect chronotherapy effectiveness. There is a need for a well-tuned circadian timing system in order to increase chronotherapy activity. Prospective studies are needed for determining the impact of therapeutic approaches on sleep disorders upon quality of life and survival of cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2014.10.022DOI Listing
March 2015

Very late recurrence of Diethylstilbestrol - related clear cell carcinoma of the cervix: case report.

Gynecol Oncol Res Pract 2015 17;2. Epub 2015 Jul 17.

Department of Oncology, Paul Brousse University Hospital AP-HP, 12-14 Avenue Paul Vaillant Couturier, 94800 Villejuif, France.

Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the cervix is a rare tumor of the lower genital tract. It has been described in young women with a history of intra uterine exposure to diethylstilbestrol. This tumor is characterized by a greater tendency for late recurrences. In this article, we report the case of one exposed-patient who developed recurrence as liver metastases, 24 years after the initial treatment. This case demonstrates the need and the importance for continued follow-up in individuals prenatally exposed to diethylstilbestrol.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40661-015-0010-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4880817PMC
May 2016

The circadian timing system in clinical oncology.

Ann Med 2014 Jun;46(4):191-207

INSERM, UMRS 776 'Biological Rhythms and Cancers', Campus CNRS , 7 rue Guy Môquet, 94801 Villejuif Cedex , France.

The circadian timing system (CTS) controls several critical molecular pathways for cancer processes and treatment effects over the 24 hours, including drug metabolism, cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA damage repair mechanisms. This results in the circadian time dependency of whole-body and cellular pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anticancer agents. However, CTS robustness and phase varies among cancer patients, based on circadian monitoring of rest- activity, body temperature, sleep, and/or hormonal secretion rhythms. Circadian disruption has been further found in up to 50% of patients with metastatic cancer. Such disruption was associated with poor outcomes, including fatigue, anorexia, sleep disorders, and short progression-free and overall survival. Novel, minimally invasive devices have enabled continuous CTS assessment in non-hospitalized cancer patients. They revealed up to 12-hour differences in individual circadian phase. Taken together, the data support the personalization of chronotherapy. This treatment method aims at the adjustment of cancer treatment delivery according to circadian rhythms, using programmable-in-time pumps or novel release formulations, in order to increase both efficacy and tolerability. A fixed oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin chronotherapy protocol prolonged median overall survival in men with metastatic colorectal cancer by 3.3 months as compared to conventional delivery, according to a meta-analysis (P=0.009). Further analyses revealed the need for the prevention of circadian disruption or the restoration of robust circadian function in patients on chronotherapy, in order to further optimize treatment effects. The strengthening of external synchronizers could meet such a goal, through programmed exercise, meal timing, light exposure, improved social support, sleep scheduling, and the properly timed administration of drugs that target circadian clocks. Chrono-rehabilitation warrants clinical testing for improving quality of life and survival in cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/07853890.2014.916990DOI Listing
June 2014

Sleep disruption in breast cancer patients and survivors.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2013 Dec;11(12):1523-30

From the aDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California; bAPHP, Department of Oncology, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France; cChronobiology Laboratory, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain; dINSERM UMRS776 "Biological Rhythms and Cancers," Villejuif, France; eLaboratory of Nutrition and Integrative Neurobiology (NutriNeuro), INRA 1286, Bordeaux, France; and fUniversity of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.

Sleep disruption is prevalent in patients and survivors of breast cancer. Most patients undergoing chemotherapy will experience transient sleep disruption, and nearly 60% will have chronic sleep problems. Numerous factors contribute to sleep disruption in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Sleep disruption is a consequence of several biological alterations, including circadian disruption and immune and metabolic deregulations. These systems also play significant roles in the control and progression of breast cancer. Sleep disruption is associated with many side effects and psychiatric and medical comorbidities. This article discusses the relationship between stress and posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and fatigue, and how sleep disturbance might be the cause or consequence of these disorders. Current evidence for management of sleep disturbance in breast cancer and high chronic use of hypnotic medication in this population is also discussed. Finally, the differences in management of sleep disturbance during acute cancer care and during the survivorship phase are discussed. More research is needed on accurate and timely assessment of sleep disturbance associated with breast cancer, and additional tailored approaches for the management of sleep problems in breast cancer should be developed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2013.0179DOI Listing
December 2013

Acute renal failure related to oxaliplatin-induced intravascular hemolysis.

Med Oncol 2010 Dec 30;27(4):1425-6. Epub 2009 Jun 30.

Department of Hematology/Oncology, Paul Brousse University Hospital, AP-HP, 12, Avenue Paul Vaillant Couturier, 94804, Villejuif, France.

Oxaliplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent frequently used in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. Rare cases of renal failure and hemolytic reactions have been reported as separate side effects of oxaliplatin. Here we present a clinical picture of immune-related intravascular hemolysis and acute tubular necrosis in a patient receiving this drug. This case suggests a mechanistic explanation of renal failure in patients treated with oxaliplatin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12032-009-9263-3DOI Listing
December 2010

Novel somatic mutations of the VHL gene in an erythropoietin-producing renal carcinoma associated with secondary polycythemia and elevated circulating endothelial progenitor cells.

Am J Hematol 2008 Feb;83(2):155-8

INSERM Unit 602, Villejuif, France.

Mutation of the VHL tumor suppressor gene is a frequent genetic event in the carcinogenesis of renal-cell carcinoma (RCC). Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have important role in neoangiogenesis, and mobilization of these cells is induced by various growth factors including erythropoietin (EPO). With this regard, we analyzed a patient with EPO-producing clear-cell RCC and polycythemia. DNA extraction and sequencing analysis of the VHL gene were performed from the tumor and the adjacent normal renal tissue. Isolated and cultured circulating EPCs from the blood taken with phlebotomy were characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis. This RCC had two novel somatic mutations of the VHL gene, p.Leu128Pro and p.Asn131Lys. Culture of blood mononuclear cells revealed a strikingly high number of endothelial cell colonies derived from EPCs (nearly 10-fold more than in controls). Elevated number of circulating EPCs seems to be related to high EPO production from RCC with novel double somatic mutation of the VHL gene in this patient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.21019DOI Listing
February 2008

Blepharitis induced by epidermal growth factor receptor-targeting therapy.

Am J Clin Oncol 2006 Oct;29(5):531

Department of Hematology/Oncology, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.coc.0000177910.47525.e8DOI Listing
October 2006

Treatment of cancer cells with methioninase produces DNA hypomethylation and increases DNA synthesis.

Cancer Res 2002 Aug;62(16):4685-9

Hematology and Oncology Department and Institut du Cancer et d'Immunogénétique, Hospital Paul-Brousse, 94804 Villejuif, France.

Methionine depletion in the human cell line CCRF-CEM through the action of recombinant methioninase (rMETase), a methionine-cleaving enzyme, was previously demonstrated to produce a strong cytotoxic synergistic effect with fluorouracil (FUra) throughout a broad range of concentrations of FUra and rMETase, including subcytotoxic levels of rMETase. Potentiation was associated with a decrease in free thymidylate synthase from preexisting levels. To further investigate the action of rMETase on CCRF-CEM cells, in the present study we explored the effects of rMETase as a single agent on DNA methylation levels and DNA synthesis, which may be changed as a result of deprivation of methionine. Cells treated with rMETase under subcytotoxic conditions contained significantly lower levels of genomic methylated DNA than did control cells, as demonstrated by incorporation of the methyl radical of [methyl-(3)H]S-adenosylmethionine in DNA and by use of methylation-sensitive arbitrarily primed PCR. DNA hypomethylation produced by rMETase was of similar magnitude as that produced with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine. Cells exposed to rMETase synthesized significantly more DNA than did untreated cells. Incorporation of [6-3H]thymidine and [6-3H]2'-deoxyuridine in these cells was augmented over that in control by mean factors of 1.78 and 2.36, respectively. Increased 3H nucleoside incorporation resulted in greater numbers of nuclear grains as demonstrated by autoradiography. The increase in DNA synthesis induced by rMETase is likely to result from enhancement of DNA repair because it was not accompanied by differences in cell cycle phase distribution or in total DNA content as determined by flow cytometry. We hypothesize that potentiation of FUra cytotoxicity by rMETase may result from increased inhibition of thymidylate synthase, together with DNA hypomethylation and enhanced DNA repair that could be involved in cell responses to drug-induced damage.
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August 2002

Images in clinical medicine. Aspergilloma.

Authors:
Ayhan Ulusakarya

N Engl J Med 2002 Jan;346(4):256

Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94805 Villejuif, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMicm980601DOI Listing
January 2002