Publications by authors named "Ayaka Okano"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of Postprandial Body Position on Gastrointestinal Motility, the Autonomic Nervous System and Subjective Comfort.

Acta Med Okayama 2017 Dec;71(6):485-491

Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health and Welfare Science, Okayama Prefectural University, Soja, Okayama 719-1197, Japan.

We examined postprandial body positions' effects on gastrointestinal motility, the autonomic nervous system and subjective comfort, i.e., whether lowering the head after a meal is beneficial for gastrointestinal motility and the prevention of pressure ulcer. We examined 10 healthy subjects and compared 3 body positions: (1) Seated upright. (2) Lying on a bed with the head at 60° and knees up by 20° (60° position). (3) Identical to (2) until post-meal; the head was then lowered to 30° (60°-30° position). Gastrointestinal motility was assessed as gastrointestinal sounds measured by sound-editing software. Digital plethysmography assessed autonomic nerve function as heart rate variability. The pressure ulcer risk was estimated as subjective comfort/discomfort using a visual analog scale. Gastrointestinal sounds increased post-meal. The 60°-30° position showed the highest number of sounds and longest cumulative sound duration. Post-meal, sympathetic activation was suggested in the 60° position, whereas vagal activity was relatively preserved in the 60°-30° position. The 60°-30° position was the most comfortable, and the 60° position was least comfortable. Lowering the head after a meal is beneficial to augment gastrointestinal motility and decrease the pressure ulcer risk. The 60° head-up position increases the pressure ulcer risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18926/AMO/55585DOI Listing
December 2017

Isomeric effects of anti-diabetic α-lipoic acid with γ-cyclodextrin.

Life Sci 2015 Sep 2;136:73-8. Epub 2015 Jul 2.

Department of Analytical and Bioinorganic Chemistry, Division of Analytical and Physical Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Japan; Department of Health, Sports, and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Welfare, Kobe Women's University, Japan. Electronic address:

Aims: Previous studies reported the anti-diabetic effects of α-lipoic acid (αLA) isomers: racemic-αLA, R-αLA, or S-αLA. Previously, we examined the anti-diabetic effects of αLA administered as a food additive, but were unable to demonstrate the differences among different isomers. In this study, αLAs were complexed with γ-cyclodextrin (γCD) for the stability.We then investigated the anti-diabetic effects of racemic-, R-, and S-αLA/γCDs in KKAy mice.

Main Methods: Male type 2 diabetic KKAy mice were divided into 5 groups, and fed either a high-fat-diet (HFD),HFD supplemented with γCD, or HFD supplemented with racemic-αLA/γCD, R-αLA/γCD, or S-αLA/γCD for 4 weeks. At the end of the feeding period, HbA1c and adiponectin levels were measured, PPARγ2mRNA expression levels were assessed in adipose tissues using real-time PCR, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation levels were evaluated in the liver by Western blotting.

Key Findings: The anti-diabetic effects of αLA; the isomeric compounds racemic-, R-, and S-αLA/γCD were investigated using amale type 2 diabetic KKAy mousemodel. Significant differences were observed in HbA1c and plasma adiponectin levels between R-αLA/γCD-treated mice and control mice. PPARγ2 mRNA expression levels were slightly higher in racemic- and R-αLA/γCD-treated mice. Moreover, AMPK phosphorylation levels were elevated in racemic-αLA/γCD- and R-αLA/γCD-treated mice, but remained unchanged in S-αLA/γCD-treated mice.

Significance: These results suggested that the stereoisomerism mediates a difference in the anti-diabetic effects of racemic-, R-, and S-αLA/γCDs. Furthermore, the anti-diabetic mechanism of αLA/γCD action may be attributed to the activation of AMPK in the liver.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2015.06.016DOI Listing
September 2015

Antidiabetic effect of the α-lipoic acid γ-cyclodextrin complex.

J Clin Biochem Nutr 2014 Sep 1;55(2):97-102. Epub 2014 Sep 1.

Department of Analytical and Bioinorganic Chemistry, Division of Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, 5, Misasagi-Nakauchi-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414, Japan ; Department of Health and Sports Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Welfare, Kobe Women's University, 4-7-2, Minatojima-Nakamachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0046, Japan.

In recent years, the number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus has been increasing worldwide. In particular, type 2 diabetes mellitus, a lifestyle-related disease, is recognized as a serious disease with various complications. Many types of pharmaceutics or specific health foods have been used for the management of diabetes mellitus. At the same time, the relationship between diabetes mellitus and α-lipoic acid has been recognized for many years. In this study, we found that the α-lipoic acid γ-cyclodextrin complex exhibited an HbA1c lowering effect for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus in animal models. Moreover, in this study, we investigated the activation of phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase, which plays a role in cellular energy homeostasis, in the liver of KKA(y) mice by using α-lipoic acid and the α-lipoic acid γ-cyclodextrin complex. Our results show that the α-lipoic acid γ-cyclodextrin complex strongly induced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase. Thus, we concluded that intake of the α-lipoic acid γ-cyclodextrin complex exerted an antidiabetic effect by suppressing the elevation of postprandial hyperglycemia as well as doing exercise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3164/jcbn.14-56DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4186374PMC
September 2014
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