Publications by authors named "Axel Gorlier"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Novel Function of Bluetongue Virus NS3 Protein in Regulation of the MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathway.

J Virol 2019 08 30;93(16). Epub 2019 Jul 30.

UMR Virologie, INRA, École Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, ANSES, Université Paris-Est, Maisons-Alfort, France

Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an arbovirus transmitted by blood-feeding midges to a wide range of wild and domestic ruminants. In this report, we showed that BTV, through its nonstructural protein NS3 (BTV-NS3), is able to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway, as assessed by phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and the translation initiation factor eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). By combining immunoprecipitation of BTV-NS3 and mass spectrometry analysis from both BTV-infected and NS3-transfected cells, we identified the serine/threonine-protein kinase B-Raf (BRAF), a crucial player in the MAPK/ERK pathway, as a new cellular interactor of BTV-NS3. BRAF silencing led to a significant decrease in the MAPK/ERK activation by BTV, supporting a model wherein BTV-NS3 interacts with BRAF to activate this signaling cascade. This positive regulation acts independently of the role of BTV-NS3 in counteracting the induction of the alpha/beta interferon response. Furthermore, the intrinsic ability of BTV-NS3 to bind BRAF and activate the MAPK/ERK pathway is conserved throughout multiple serotypes/strains but appears to be specific to BTV compared to other members of genus. Inhibition of MAPK/ERK pathway with U0126 reduced viral titers, suggesting that BTV manipulates this pathway for its own replication. Altogether, our data provide molecular mechanisms that unravel a new essential function of NS3 during BTV infection. Bluetongue virus (BTV) is responsible of the arthropod-borne disease bluetongue (BT) transmitted to ruminants by blood-feeding midges. In this report, we found that BTV, through its nonstructural protein NS3 (BTV-NS3), interacts with BRAF, a key component of the MAPK/ERK pathway. In response to growth factors, this pathway promotes cell survival and increases protein translation. We showed that BTV-NS3 enhances the MAPK/ERK pathway, and this activation is BRAF dependent. Treatment of MAPK/ERK pathway with the pharmacologic inhibitor U0126 impairs viral replication, suggesting that BTV manipulates this pathway for its own benefit. Our results illustrate, at the molecular level, how a single virulence factor has evolved to target a cellular function to increase its viral replication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00336-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6675888PMC
August 2019

Evaluation of an IGM-specific ELISA for early detection of bluetongue virus infections in domestic ruminants sera.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2019 Jan 23;66(1):537-545. Epub 2018 Nov 23.

Laboratoire de Santé Animale d'Alfort, Université Paris Est, ANSES, ENVA, INRA, UMR 1161 VIROLOGIE, Maisons-Alfort, France.

Competitive-ELISA (c-ELISA) is the most widely used serological test for the detection of Bluetongue virus (BTV) viral protein 7 (VP7) antibodies (Ab). However, these BTV c-ELISAs cannot to distinguish between IgG and IgM. IgM Ab are generated shortly after the primary immune response against an infectious agent, indicating a recent infection or exposure to antigens, such as after vaccination. Because the BTV genome or anti-VP7 Ab can be detected in ruminant blood months after infection, BTV diagnostic tools cannot discriminate between recent and old infections. In this study, we evaluated an IgM-capture ELISA prototype to detect ruminant anti-BTV VP7 IgM on 1,650 serum samples from cattle, sheep, or goats. Animals were BTV-naive, infected, or/and vaccinated with BTV-1, -2, -4, -8, -9, -16, or -27, and we also included 30 sera from cattle infected with the Epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotype 6. Results demonstrated that this ELISA kit is specific and can detect the presence of IgM with satisfactory diagnostic specificity and sensitivity from 1 to 5 weeks after BTV infection in domestic ruminants (for goats and cattle; for sheep, at least up to 24 days). The peak of anti-VP7 IgM was reached when the level of infectious viruses and BTV RNA in blood were the highest. The possibility of detecting BTV-RNA in IgM-positive sera allows the amplification and sequencing of the partial RNA segment 2 (encoding the serotype specific to VP2) to determine the causative BTV serotype/strain. Therefore, BTV IgM ELISA can detect the introduction of BTV (or EHDV) in an area with BTV-seropositive domestic animals regardless of their serological BTV status. This approach may also be of particular interest for retrospective epidemiological studies on frozen serum samples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.13060DOI Listing
January 2019

Emergence of bluetongue virus serotype 4 in mainland France in November 2017.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2018 Oct 8;65(5):1158-1162. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

UMR 1161 ANSES/INRA/ENVA, Université Paris-Est ANSES Maisons-Alfort, Maisons-Alfort, France.

In November 2017, a 15-day-old calf located in France (Haute-Savoie department) was found positive for bluetongue virus (BTV) RNA by RT-PCR. Laboratory investigations allowed the isolation and identification of the serotype: BTV-4. The analysis of the full viral genome showed that all the 10 genome segments were closely related to BTV-4 strains involved in a large BT outbreak in the Balkan Peninsula, in Italy since 2014 and in Corsica since the end of October 2016. These results together with epidemiological data suggest that BTV-4 has been introduced to mainland France from Corsica or Italy where BTV-4 outbreaks have been reported in summer and autumn 2016. This is the first report of the introduction of BTV-4 in mainland France.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.12919DOI Listing
October 2018