Publications by authors named "Awadhesh Kumar Tripathi"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Potential of cotton for remediation of Cd-contaminated soils.

Environ Monit Assess 2021 Mar 13;193(4):186. Epub 2021 Mar 13.

ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, Nabi Bagh, Berasia Road, Bhopal, India.

The present research was conducted to study the potential of cotton for the remediation of soils contaminated with Cd, to understand the biochemical basis of its tolerance to, and to investigate the plant-microbe interaction in the rhizosphere for enhancement of phytoextraction of Cd. Cotton (Bt RCH-2) was exposed to four Cd levels (0, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg soil) in a completely randomised design and found that the plant could tolerate up to 200 mg/kg soil. Cd stress increased the total phenol, proline, and free amino acid contents in the plant leaf tissue compared with control but inhibited basal soil respiration, fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis, and activities of several enzymes viz. dehydrogenase, phosphatases, and β-glucosidase in the soil over control. The concentration of Cd in the shoot was less than the critical concentration of 100 µg/g dry weight, and bioconcentration and translocation factors were < 1 to classify the plant as a hyperaccumulator of Cd. This was further confirmed by another experiment in which the cotton plant was exposed various higher levels of Cd (200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 mg/kg soil). Though the concentration of Cd in the shoot was > 100 µg g dw beyond 600 mg Cd/kg soil, the bioconcentration and translocation factors were < 1. The study on plant-microbe (Aspergillus awamori) interaction revealed that the fungus did not affect the absorption of Cd by cotton. It was concluded that the cotton was classified as an excluder of Cd and therefore could be suitable for the phytostabilization of Cd-contaminated soils.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-021-08976-5DOI Listing
March 2021

In situ decomposition of crop residues using lignocellulolytic microbial consortia: a viable alternative to residue burning.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Feb 24. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal, 462038, India.

Open field burning of crop residue causes severe air pollution and greenhouse gas emission contributing to global warming. In order to seek an alternative, the current study was initiated to explore the prospective of lignocellulolytic microbes to expedite in situ decomposition of crop residues. Field trials on farmers' field were conducted in the state of Haryana and Maharashtra, to target the burning of rice and wheat residue and sugarcane trash, respectively. A comparative study among crop residue removal (CRR), crop residue burning (CRB) and in situ decomposition of crop residues (IND) revealed that IND of rice and wheat residues took 30 days whereas IND of sugarcane trash took 45 days. The decomposition status was assessed by determining the initial and final lignin to cellulose ratio which increased significantly from 0.23 to 0.25, 0.21 to 0.23 and 0.24 to 0.27 for rice, wheat residues and sugarcane trash, respectively. No yield loss was noticed in IND for both rice-wheat system and sugarcane-based system; rather IND showed relatively better crop yield as well as soil health parameters than CRB and CRR. Furthermore, the environmental impact assessment of residue burning indicated a substantial loss of nutrients (28-31, 23-25 and 51-77 kg ha of N+PO+KO for rice, wheat and sugarcane residue) as well as the emission of pollutants to the atmosphere. However, more field trials, as well as refinement of the technology, are warranted to validate and establish the positive potential of in situ decomposition of crop residue to make it a successful solution against the crop residue burning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-12611-8DOI Listing
February 2021

Tolerance of cotton to elevated levels of Pb and its potential for phytoremediation.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Feb 23. Epub 2021 Feb 23.

ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, Nabi Bagh, Berasia Road, Bhopal, India.

Two experiments were conducted to determine the cotton plant's tolerance to Pb and its remediation potential. In the first experiment, the phytoremediation potential was determined by exposing the plant to four levels of Pb (0, 500, 750, and 1000 mg kg). The cotton plant exhibited an excellent tolerance index at Pb 1000 mg kg (root 78.65% and shoot 93.08%) and lower grade of growth inhibition (root 21.35% and shoot 6.92%). Pb stress resulted in higher leakage of electrolytes and increased the synthesis of higher proline, total phenol, and free amino acid contents to mitigate stress. The plant could not meet the criteria of a hyperaccumulator of Pb. The concentration of Pb in the shoot was a mere 96 μg g dry wt (< the critical judging concentration of 1000 μg g dry wt), and bioconcentration and translocation factors were <1. The study established that cotton exhibited an exclusion mechanism of Pb. Further, the translocation efficiency (TE %) was very low, i.e., <50% (ranged from 49% at 500 mg kg to 42% at 1000 mg kg ), and the % of Pb removed by the crop was too little (on an average 0.1%). Pb inhibited the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) by 76%, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis by 60%, and β-glucosidase activity by 20%. However, applied Pb increased the population of actinomycetes by 3.21 times, but significantly decreased heterotrophic bacteria by 3.40 times and N fixers by over 53% over control. In the second experiment, the plant was exposed to very high Pb (0, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 mg kg ) to determine the concentration up to which the plant will survive. The investigation revealed that plants could survive up to Pb 3000 mg kg. It confirmed the first experiment in the tolerance index, grade of growth inhibition, bioconcentration factor, translocation factor, and partitioning of Pb. Therefore, it was concluded that the cotton plant was an excluder of Pb and could be effectively cultivated for the phytostabilization of soils polluted with Pb.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-13067-6DOI Listing
February 2021

Evaluation of Furcraea foetida (L.)Haw. for phytoremediation of cadmium contaminated soils.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Mar 25;28(11):14177-14181. Epub 2021 Jan 25.

ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, NabiBagh, Berasia Road, Bhopal, 462038, India.

In the present study, we evaluated Furcraea foetida for the phytoremediation of cadmium (Cd)-contaminated soils. We selected F. foetida because it is a drought-resistant plant, produces high biomass, and needs minimum maintenance. It belongs to the leaf fiber group of plants and therefore has economic importance. Since it is a non-edible crop, there is no danger of food chain contamination. Despite possessing these ideal characteristics, surprisingly, to date, the plant is underutilized for phytoremediation purposes. Therefore, to evaluate the phytoremediation potential of the plant, we exposed it to five levels of cadmium (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg Cd kg soil) and studied its influence on growth, dry matter production, uptake, and translocation efficiency. The plant showed good tolerance to Cd 200 mg kg soil without exhibiting any visible toxicity symptoms. The metal mainly accumulated in the roots (233 μg gdw), followed by leaf (51 μg g dw). The bioconcentration factor was > 1, but the translocation factor was < 1. The plant was not classified as a hyperaccumulator of Cd; however, because of its high uptake (897 μ g plant) and translocation efficiency (78%), we concluded that the plant could be utilized for phytoextraction of Cd from soils with low to moderately contaminated soils.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-12534-4DOI Listing
March 2021
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